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Hemi 5.7 engine - ticking noise getting worse

Discussion in 'Shop - Engine' started by 4x4nutz, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. 4x4nutz

    4x4nutz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    I have a 2007 Doge Ram 1500 with a 5.7 Hemi in it that has been making a ticking noise for the past three years. It has gotten much louder and it's getting a little embarrassing to drive. The noise isn't bad at idle, but once the rpms go up, the ticking gets louder and faster. I've heard it called the "HEMI Tic" by some, and it is said to be a lifter/spring/ valve issue. I want to have it fixed, but I also want to pick up some horse power without spending a lot of money. While I am in the engine, what can I replace to give the engine some more nutz? I am somewhat mechanically retarded (mentally disabled), so I would like to rely on my desert racing brothers and sisters for some advice. thanks, Don\m/
     
  2. 4x4nutz

    4x4nutz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    It's a big truck, and what's funny is when I got it new, the window sticker and dealer invoice called it a "1500," even though it had 2500 suspension and a straight axle. No doubt some of you will recognize this truck as it been to a lot of the Texas races.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. idealer

    idealer Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Costa Mesa, CA
    The first think I would do is pull the valve covers and check the lash and see if its within tollerance & inspect the springs.
     
  4. 4x4nutz

    4x4nutz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    Is the lash adjustable in th 07 5.7? When I get back to civilization, I'll check my oil pressure (if the oil pressure sucks, I might need to do a LOT more), and if that's good, I'll take off my covers and check the lash on all the valves, and give the springs a good once over. I'll find out what the specs are and get a feeler guage and go to work. HOPEFULLY, that's what the issue is. Thanks!
     
  5. idealer

    idealer Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Costa Mesa, CA
    That engine should have hydraulic lifters so it would be set at zero lash. But I dont know **[​IMG] ¡Ay, caramba!****[​IMG] ¡Ay, caramba!****[​IMG] ¡Ay, caramba!****[​IMG] ¡Ay, caramba!** about hemi's I would look in the service manual for all the specs.
     
  6. 4x4nutz

    4x4nutz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    So you think there shouldn't be any space between the rocker arm and the tip of the valve stem? Is that what you mean by zero? I'm not sure if it would have anything to do with it, but a week ago I was coming off the off-ramp onto the freeway at high RPM and the truck back fired and the engine light went on (it has never back-fired before). My son put his diagnostic computer on it and it said cylinder 3 misfire. I was just thinking that this may have been the result of a chain reactionand caused by a broken spring or too much lash effecting the exhaust valve for cylinder 3. He cleared it and the light has not come back on. This is a learning thing for me, and I appreciate the feedback.
     
  7. 4x4nutz

    4x4nutz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    I found this on the net. Looks like we may be on to something! Hope it turns out. :

    Perhaps the most costly misfire malfunction to correct is the mechanical misfire. This problem is linked to a defect in the engine’s internal components. Bad head gaskets, worn piston rings, bad valves and worn cylinder walls are all culprits. Damaged or broken rocker arms, broken valve springs, and worn camshaft lobes or lifters are also reasons for mechanical misfiring. Most of these failures will be accompanied by some form of internal engine noise. A worn timing chain will often rattle as it slaps the timing cover, and a broken rocker arm will sound like a big piece of metal is rattling around inside the top of your engine. Other failures such as a broken valve spring may make no noise at all other than the engine popping and pinging. These mechanical failures are often heard as a more consistent noise and will in most cases increase in relative equality with vehicle engine speed. Timely oil changes and periodic maintenance of your Dodge’s power train is required to help prevent this type of failure.
     

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