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TIG "weave" welds

Discussion in 'Shop - Fabrication' started by Iggle, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. Iggle

    Iggle Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Lake forest
    Is there any good video out there that shows how to lay down a good TIG weave type of weld? Do you have to walk the cup to acheive this type of weld? What is the best technique? It is done by also using the laywire versus dipping the rod? What is the purpose of using that type of weld versus just a standard TIG weld where you dip the rod, besides just looking pretty.

    Thanks
    Iggy
     
  2. atomicjoe23

    atomicjoe23 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    Location:
    Silverdale, WA
    You can do a weave by either walking the cup or by what you refer to as "standard" TIG welding. . .

    . . .usually (not always) the purpose of a weave is to make a wider pass when working with thicker materials (but sometimes it can be for cosmetic reasons as well); you normally try to match the fillet to the thickness of the material and that is not always possible in a single pass. This method is used a lot in pipe welding, but has found it's way into our world as well.

    There are a lot of videos of this method out there. . .doing a YouTube search should turn up a more than you have time to watch. There are a few that have been posted on this forum as well. . .I don't have a link to any ready to go, but a search should serve you well.
     
  3. Iggle

    Iggle Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Lake forest
    I have done a search for videos but nothing really shows the technique up close.

    Does anybody have any videos they can post? Or links?
     
  4. kdm73091

    kdm73091 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2008
    Location:
    west hills
    there arent to many videos that are able to properly show the technique... its all trial and error and alot alota practice.. you do your route pass first then do a weave pass, its really just to make it look pretty imo, and you should dip rather then lay wire... if you do your route pass first then realisticaly if you fed in enough filler rod you shouldnt have to use much filler when weaving... again its all about practicing and trying different techniques and torch angles... i have alot of pics of weaves ive done but im not sure how to post them on here.. camburg used to have a good video but they took it down.
     
  5. mikeyfrombc

    mikeyfrombc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Whonnock B.C. Canada
    [video=youtube;QBWDKtDx2mE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBWDKtDx2mE&feature=related[/video]
     
  6. KevinT4R

    KevinT4R Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Location:
    Whittier, CA
    Jerry Zaiden posted up a TIG weave video a while back...

    Edit...Whoops someone beat me to it.

    In any event it showed the constant pedal "laywire" technique. You work the torch back and forth across the center of the weld joint with the rod following the torch.

    Awesome video above! ^^^ Well worth the time to watch it.

    Whether you use the constant pedal/laywire method or the pulse method, a weave pass should not be the first pass. Start out with a "standard" narrow root pass, and then follow that with a weave pass to increase the depth and coverage area of the weld.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  7. mikeyfrombc

    mikeyfrombc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Whonnock B.C. Canada
    really ??? s buddy of mine is a pipe welder and i watched him do a root pass walking the cup on some 6" pipe i beveled for him as he was doing practice passes to brush up on his procedures , he later capped the pass with stick . this is a very common procedure
     
  8. KevinT4R

    KevinT4R Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Location:
    Whittier, CA
    I was just referring to root vs. weave pass on a roll cage or suspension part. No doubt pipe welding is different--especially when there's a gap to fill.

    The photos show some custom Johnny Joints I welded. The root pass established good penetration and the weave pass built up the breadth and depth of the fillet.

    These Johnny Joints are used in the rear links of my 4Runner. A broken weld would yield devastating results. No such trouble so far despite hard use.
     

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  9. DavidD

    DavidD New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Location:
    Greer, SC
    Most pipe welders will walk the cup for all our passes. When running the root you don't walk very far just a real tight back and forth motion. The next pass your hot pass is where you run a weave.
     
  10. BajaFand

    BajaFand Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Location:
    San Dimas, CA
    It should be noted that just because you are using a "constant pedal" technique, that doesn't mean you have to just lay down the wire. In fact, I don't know many people that actually do that. Most everyone I know (myself included) uses a "constant pedal" but dips the rod in the puddle just the same as if you were doing a pulse technique.
     
  11. 9er3ranger

    9er3ranger New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Walking the cup is used when running uphill usually
     

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