2000 F150 4x4 Long Travel ?

silverstateracer

Well-Known Member
Posts
50
Reaction
0
This may be a bad place to start this question but couldn't find another thread to post the question..... Why would straight axle be couter productive? TT's still use them in the rear. Wouldn't approx 20" of 3 or 4 link, coil over, solid-axle travel be better in some ways to approx. 15" of maxed out CV A-arm travel ? Just a question for the fab shops at large, or anyone who has seen both sides tried.
 

tedmales

Well-Known Member
Posts
541
Reaction
10
i am not sure but i thinksolid front end is limited by the steering, i would think that 20" of bump steer would not be that good.
 

jeff

Moderator
Posts
7,425
Reaction
321
I don't know how long you guys have been around the sport but the "old" 4wd LeDuc Jeep Cherokee used to do pretty well. It is by no means fancy but it seemed to get the job done. Check out that truck to see what a solid axle 4wd vehicle can do in the desert.



It does seem to sort of be a step back into time though, especially for a company looking to attract new business. While some people might be hesitant to ditch the I-beam setup my guess is it'll be really tough to get someone to revert to a solid front axle setup. Sure, an inexpensive rock crawler might be interested in coverting his Toyota from IFS to a solid axle, but how many people are asking to convert their prerunners or race trucks to this setup?

If you could make a reliable and less expensive IFS rear drive system I bet you'd see very few solid axles used. The Dondel machine (when it's all sorted out) should be a hell of a truck. Ivan's old truck did pretty well (how many victories?) and that's probably the direction the big boys will take once driveline technology catches up with the engine and tire builders.

Aloha
 

motoxscott

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,240
Reaction
299
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
if we build something with a straight axle front end and make the whole setup work really good then people shoud get the message that we can build anything they want and it will be super high quality.

[/ QUOTE ]

Why would you think people would think you can build anything if you can setup a truck with a solid axle? It's doesnt take that much work to do. It takes alot more skills and knowledge to build up an a-arm design.

Converting a F-150 a-arm truck to a solid axle makes no sense to me if your intentions are to build an off-road truck with a lot of travel. Sure it could work, but if you put the same amount of time and testing into the a-arms, the solid axle will still be a step backwards.

A solid axle also adds a good amount of weight and you're not gonna have the amount of adjustments a-arms give you.

I always liked the Don-A-Vee Jeep.

Just thought I would throw those thoughts out ............

-Scott
 

DougM

Well-Known Member
Posts
746
Reaction
9
All the Grand Cherokee are a 4 link with coils front and rear with solid axles for/aft.. Stock and even properly setup they can conquer quite a bit for a unibodied vehicle. 10" + travel is common.
Solid axles in the dez work quite well just see the above photos. LeDuc, Steve Kelly , and Mike Lesle ran the solid axle Jeeps until Curt bought the A-armed ex Maddox /Jack Johnson /Shell Cherokee and hung Grand Cherokee fiberglass on it..
 

Attachments

  • 67363-ZJsmall.jpg
    67363-ZJsmall.jpg
    19 KB · Views: 323

Ryan B

Well-Known Member
Posts
356
Reaction
10
It's true that a 4wd a arm in my opinion is better. but to design and build a fully race worthy a-arm setup would cost way too much to sell. I also never said all we're going to do is full axle stuff. this isn't directed at anyone i'm not trying to be a jerk
 
Top