2020 BAJA 500

Bajacolorado

Well-Known Member
Right on - that is how to roll! I will be spectatin' and camping. Was down there the same time last year for fishing and camping near Gonzaga. I live in the desert and 95 for a high is fine. That is what shade is for. For you racers - I realize it is hotter in the vehicle and that is part of desert racing. You guys are testing yourselves and it is fun to cheer you on! I have helped pit off and on in the past and love being part of it all. The empandas at Don Jesus - are they meat filled too? - or the sweet more pastry type? I feel safer in Mexico than in most large cities of the US. I also feel more freedom down there. Baja is adventure not a theme park. Will check out La Morina! I will be eating the fried seafood platter at Alphonsinas in Gonzaga a few days after the race and visiting Coco.
 

Charlietuna

Well-Known Member
Most likely testing in plaster city

If they had all been headed westbound, I would agree. See lots of San Diego based teams testing at PC on the regular. But there were more than a few that were headed eastbound (and even saw a couple going north on Hwy 86). I drove from Imperial to Yuma and back to San Diego a few times over the weekend and saw racecars and prerunners going all directions.
 

bajafox

Accepted
Quick tip for anyone spectating in area's that's especially hot and plan on being there for the bikes, have a lot of cold water ready. A few years ago we were in San Felipe at the 500 and it was scorching, 2 bike guys pulled into our spot asking for water. After that we held up water bottles to bike guys passing by just in case. You never know but this could help save one of them till their next stop.
 

Bajacolorado

Well-Known Member
thx for the tip on the Meat Empanadas at Panchitas!


Also for the water tip BajaFox - make it obvioius to the bikes as they will be zoned and focused
 

cjohnson

Well-Known Member
Quick tip for anyone spectating in area's that's especially hot and plan on being there for the bikes, have a lot of cold water ready. A few years ago we were in San Felipe at the 500 and it was scorching, 2 bike guys pulled into our spot asking for water. After that we held up water bottles to bike guys passing by just in case. You never know but this could help save one of them till their next stop.
Some extra ice too if possible. Lot's of heat stroke victims that year. The paramedics were begging everyone in the pits for ice to cool them off.
 

Dustino81

Well-Known Member
Some extra ice too if possible. Lot's of heat stroke victims that year. The paramedics were begging everyone in the pits for ice to cool them off.
Great advice . As a bike guy myself and being active duty military that has trained in extreme weather conditions, I HIGHLY recommend that teams have ice sheets in every pit . Have a dedicated cooler filled with a mixture of ice and water , stuff the cooler with old thin cotton bed sheets . In the event of a heat injury/stroke wrap the individual nude in sheets, it could save someone’s life . It’s gonna be hot , but not unbearable. Have fun ! Race safe !
 

cjohnson

Well-Known Member
Great advice . As a bike guy myself and being active duty military that has trained in extreme weather conditions, I HIGHLY recommend that teams have ice sheets in every pit . Have a dedicated cooler filled with a mixture of ice and water , stuff the cooler with old thin cotton bed sheets . In the event of a heat injury/stroke wrap the individual nude in sheets, it could save someone’s life . It’s gonna be hot , but not unbearable. Have fun ! Race safe !
Another treatment is to place ice packs on the groin, arm pits and around the neck.
 

mig29

Well-Known Member
115+ on the dry lake today. Better have a plan to deal with the heat.
I was in Death Valley in mid-July, it was 123 at the bottom, 90 at Dante's View (5400 ft) with cool breeze. I was getting higher-than-normal Temp readings as I climbed hills (Hwy 15 north, Cajon Pass), Hwy 127 from Baker to Death Valley Junction. Never got it before. I thought it was just abnormally hot temps (115 in Baker/CA). As I got near the crest (Dante's View), really steep incline, my upper-radiator hose blew out from the radiator flange! Lost 8 quarts of coolant, saw steam come out of the hood..not good!

I turned off the car (BMW 325i e36), backed it down dead-stick to a turnout. Found it was just a hose-clamp that got loose (exacerbated by hot radiator temps due to 90 deg plus ambient), re-attached it. Luckily, I brought (at the last minute) coolant concentrate. I brought 6 gallons of new bottled water, & 2 additional gallons of drinking water. Added coolant & water in 1:1 ratio, bled the system. Drove to the top of Dante's View..I was only 50 ft away when things blew up.

^^^ Recommend everybody bring coolant (not pre-mixed) & water. Be prepared on how to fix hoses. Get silicone tape designed to fix radiator hoses. Bring extra hose clamps. Bring extra upper/lower radiator hoses, heater hoses, etc. Educate yourself on how to bleed your cooling system

Remaining pics are about "acts of kindness" -- people were freely offering me water

1) young group from Utah
I approached them asking for help. Girl took 1 gallon jug of water from her cooler, & refilled mine!

2) Guy in SUV
came up to me about staying hydrated. Went back to SUV, gave me 3 ice cold water bottles

3) couple from NY
I helped them by taking photos. Guy was grateful & gave me 2 cans of beer

4) Alabama family
real "NASCAR looking", souther hospitality friendly, woman freely gave me 2 bottles

5) guy in van
filled my 1 gallon jug

6) guy from Las Vegas
gave me water, meat & cheese & bread for sandwiches

7) couple from Pahrump
gave me soda & water bottle. His wife told me he had brain injury, in his younger days he was wild. Caught xxx for female biologist, for $$

8) professional videographer from Hollywood
gave me water bottles, & melted water from cooler. We exchanged contact info, we're friends

9) 2 guys gave me mushroom snacks
I ran out of crackers & bread. Cold cuts, no bread, is not civilized

10) young Asian couple from Vegas (UNLV students, female undergrad biology, male PhD student chemistry)
got flat tire, couldn't figure out to change it. They woke me up (taking nap), their Toyota Prius had the clunky screw jack. I just used Sears floor jack (in my BMW). Girl gave me banana, apple, water. See pic

^^^ be prepared to meet "good people". But, be street-wise & size up any bad apples.

Was running out of water, 7 gallons doesn't span 10 days. I would approach people saying:

"Did you bring a cooler? Can I have the melted water?


A water pump imploded on me 2 yrs ago (near Castaic/CA), the bearings disintegrated. Luckily, I was near an off-ramp & pulled into gas station (avoided overheating thankfully). Had to get towed home. I put in replacement water pump WITHOUT disconnecting radiator..it's possible in some cases!! I would even bring a spare water pump & be prepared to install it in middle-of-nowhere. I would also bring a spare starter (for automatic transmission cars)

"In Baja, you're ON YOUR OWN."
-- Pete Sohren

^^^ I abide by this advice. Bring LOTS of spare parts. I have like 4 extra CPS (Crank Position Sensor), crank timing sensor (on distributor), extra ECM (Engine Control Module), TWO spare tires (in case I lose 1, I have a backup). I only brought 1 spare tire for 2019 NORRA 1K, I had a front right tire disintegrate (beyond 5 yrs old) after Coco's corner. Couldn't find a spare at the junkyard when I got Hwy 5/Hwy 1 intersection. I WASTED 4 hours looking for spare tire in Guerrero Negro, drove ALL NIGHT to Loreto..BRUTAL! My lights went bad just outside Guerrero Negro..it would only work in high-beam!

Got there at 4am..just as bikes were lining up for the start


I went to a (modern) AutoZone in Loreto to get replacement headlight bulbs. Baja is more forgiving -- it's more USA like with modern amenities (Gringo Auto parts stores, nice roads, etc)
 

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Bricoop

Well-Known Member
Great advice . As a bike guy myself and being active duty military that has trained in extreme weather conditions, I HIGHLY recommend that teams have ice sheets in every pit . Have a dedicated cooler filled with a mixture of ice and water , stuff the cooler with old thin cotton bed sheets . In the event of a heat injury/stroke wrap the individual nude in sheets, it could save someone’s life . It’s gonna be hot , but not unbearable. Have fun ! Race safe !
Medical question-

When someone is undergoing heat exhaustion/stroke, and the ambient temperature is 115, is it better to leave a race suit on and fill it with ice, or is it better to have them nude? (optimal would be to get them into an A/C'd car nude with ice).
 

ACME

Well-Known Member
Must reading for any Baja event from Bob Bower's:



WHAT ABOUT YOU?
I will be blunt. Not brief. This may be the wrong time for brevity.
Deal with it.
It is possible that there will be at least one less member of the greater off-road community around, come November 18, 2018.
Someone could die because of their involvement in the Baja 1000.
Dead. Gone.
Will it be you?
“Of course not”. “No way”. “That stuff happens to other people!”
If it pleases you, just toss this thing now. After all, it's just the ranting of one of those guys who never lacked an opinion, or wasted the opportunity to thrust it upon you. Now is the time. There’s a trash can around here somewhere. Toss it if you want to.
If, on the other hand, you might be open to what one guy with a little experience has to offer, read on.
People, the single biggest danger to our safety as we involve ourselves in this race is us. Us. We represent the single largest jeopardy to our own well being out of all the freak things that could happen. On the surface, it would seem that those most in danger of clobbering themselves are those that have less experience down there. I wonder.
I am one of those with experience, and I know how seductive it is to tell myself that my experience gives me license to risk more than those without it. “The rules are for the new guys” “I can compress time frames”. “I can eat later”. “I don't need to take a nap”. “If I follow this stupid overloaded truck all night, I'll miss my deadline”. “I've got great lights, and I can see past all 6 vehicles ahead of me and take them all in one pass”.
This race is one long son of a gun. All drivers will feel the pressure to drive past sunset. It's a given. It's a must! There are loads of stories about Baja at night. What is interesting is that very few of the really scary stories come from the race cars. The most amazing and most tragic come from the highway travelers. Is that you? Have you had “Your Story” yet? It's out there, waiting for you. There have been times when the situation happens very far north. Like a tanker full of fish crashing around Santo Tomas, and closing the highway for over 5 hours. Now your time frames are shot. What do you do?
The history of what goes on and how we deal with it is not something to take lightly. Motorhomes crash. People fly, land, and suffer. Tractor-trailer rigs roll over and burn. A pickup full of drunk locals veers over the line and smacks a perfectly good Bronco with chasers in it.
It is not a case of “Will it happen?”, but a fact that it will happen. To whom, we don't know. We will know when the flash comes on the radio. Not right away mind you, but only after all the wrong information has had its chance to stab the hearts of those that know names, and care.

Know this. Medical assistance for emergencies comes late, and is lacking. You have to hope that someone associated with the race will be close by and help you. It is first aid at best. Worse is going through a nasty wreck, and you coming through it fine, but your buddy is bleeding and out cold. You were behind the wheel. How do you feel? He trusted you to take care of business so he could sleep.
Here is what you should do to increase your chances of staying out of harms way.
Eat food even if you are not hungry.
(Energy drinks will not nourish. They are not food)
Drive for a maximum of 6 hours and give it to your partner.
(There is only one Ironman)
Leave early.
Plan on getting to your destination late.
Don't drink alcoholic stuff. Period.
Do not use drugs. Period.
Ask yourself, “Are we important enough to the people in the race car that they will
feel good about us getting maimed trying to catch them?”
Ask yourself, “Would I do this if my kids were with me?”
Now…
Think about the great time you will have when you make it back home.
Think about the great feeling of being involved in the toughest off-road race in the world, and getting back home to tell the tales.
Think about how those at home will roll their eyes, and be patient, when you start on one of your stories.
Think about how proud of yourself you will be when you hear a horror story about someone else and realize you did things the right way, and went through the danger successfully.
It may sound corny, but think about how happy your Mom & Dad, or wife, or sister or brother, and yes, your kids, will be when you talk to them after you are home, safe and sound.
You've just had the adventure of a lifetime, and you are back! Wagging your tail, your mouth going like a ducks butt, telling everyone what an experience it was.
I'm going to the Baja 1000. I am going to have a ball. I won't forget a moment. It will be the biggest, baddest damn race ever.
And, I'm coming back from it.
With stories. With experiences. With laughs. With memories, and with the pride that comes of doing a good job.
What about you?

BB
“Life Is A One Lap Race!”
 

Dustino81

Well-Known Member
Medical question-

When someone is undergoing heat exhaustion/stroke, and the ambient temperature is 115, is it better to leave a race suit on and fill it with ice, or is it better to have them nude? (optimal would be to get them into an A/C'd car nude with ice).
In a race situation, and ice sheets are NOT readily available . Race suite gets unzipped , everything un-cuffed, boots off , helmet off and start filling with ice , ice-water . This lets the suit keep the ice against the core . However , whenever placing ice against skin it must be monitored along with core temp as to not cause frost bite (yes it’s possible in summer temps) . If ice sheets are present , racer is getting strip naked , and covered in ice sheets. This being said , if we are assisting anyone that has reached this point , get the core temp down to prevent brain damage,cardiac arrest, organ failure, etc but they need professional medical attention ASAP.
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
just heard on radio boarder closure extended to oct 21, ' non essential travel, ^^^get suit off asap and cool as much of core, cool water, cold wet towels back of neck, heat exhaustion is easy to spot& dont take anyones " im ok " excuse, keep eye on all your crew!!& yourself!!
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
just heard on radio boarder closure extended to oct 21, ' non essential travel, ^^^get suit off asap and cool as much of core, cool water, cold wet towels back of neck, heat exhaustion is easy to spot& dont take anyones " im ok " excuse, keep eye on all your crew!!& yourself!!
^Yes!, if cold packs/ ice available, shove inside suit& water down!, t shirt/ nomex underwear should protect skin from ice, main thing is to get the core temp Down AsAp!!
 

michael.gonzalez

Well-Known Member
For those that don't already know:

pack 1 gallon per person per day. MINIMUM. That's not considering the heat.

I'd pack ~1.5gal per person per day.

Example:
- 2 people
- 5 day trip
- High Heat expected

2 * 5 * 1.5 = 12 gallons
 
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