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2020 King of Hammers!!!!!

Curtis Guise

Administrator

The 2020 Nitto King of the Hammers Powered by Optima Batteries will be live all week from Feb. 1st to Feb. 8th.

Live video schedule
  • Feb 1, 11am, Power Hour 4pm: Can-Am UTV KOH Qualifying.
  • Feb 2, 11am-4pm: Can-Am UTV King of the Hammers race presented by HCR
  • Feb 3, 8am, Power Hour 4pm: 4WP EMC Qualifying
  • Feb 3, 6-9pm: Holley EFi Shootout
  • Feb 4, 8am, Power Hour 4pm: 4WP KOH Qualifying and ProEagle, Buggy Whips, Boxo Tools Pit Crew Challenge
  • Feb 5, 8am-6pm: 4WP Every Man Challenge
  • Feb 6, 8am-5pm: Toyo T1 Desert Invitational presented by Monster Energy
  • Feb 7, 8am-10pm: Nitto King of the Hammers powered by OPTIMA Batteries
  • Feb 8, 11am, Power Hour 4pm: Progressive King of the Motos
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
Love the coverage and it is always better. Color commentators need some help in the control room for sure. Too many cars in and out of the frame for long periods remaining unidentified. Not enough situational/team/inside-the-sport-in-general commentary during a whole lot of dead air. These guys are doing too much to produce/engineer this race themselves or the production isn't being funded as it should be given the amount of money that is obviously being thrown around on the course/elsewhere.
Just my $.02
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
...was there somebody else in the 2nd place car as it rolled down hill/over his foot?
 
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stephenrjking

Well-Known Member
Love the coverage and it is always better. Color commentators need some help in the control room for sure. Too many cars in and out of the frame for long periods remaining unidentified. Not enough situational/team/inside-the-sport-in-general commentary during a whole lot of dead air. These guys are doing too much to produce/engineer this race themselves or the production isn't being funded as it should be given the amount of money that is obviously being thrown around on the course/elsewhere.
Just my $.02
Let’s be fair: KOH puts a ton of production effort into its tape-delay tv package. The episodes are extremely well done and enjoyable. If you haven’t seen them, last year’s are available on YouTube and they’re worth watching.

The Livestream exists for existing fans. The ones at the track and the ones that want to watch. There is no viral linking going around social media, reaching people who know nothing about the sport, on Super Bowl Sunday. It’s not going to significantly grow the sport, so there is little ROI available to invest significantly more money on live production staff and equipment.

Compare this livestream to what is available for Baja. Not even the same league, right? These are vehicles traversing incredibly remote mountain formations in the desert in the middle of nowhere. And all these key spots are live in my living room. I wish they were giving more detailed running order updates, but the nature of the sport makes that difficult anyway. I’m just glad for what we have.
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
Let’s be fair: KOH puts a ton of production effort into its tape-delay tv package. The episodes are extremely well done and enjoyable. If you haven’t seen them, last year’s are available on YouTube and they’re worth watching...."
Not really in to 'fair' (not a term that us old folk are used to hearing or using) nor talking about a tape delay tv package that hasn't been produced as of yet given that the race just ended 5 minutes ago.

Livestream exists for existing fans. The ones at the track and the ones that want to watch. There is no viral linking going around social media, reaching people who know nothing about the sport, on Super Bowl Sunday. It’s not going to significantly grow the sport, so there is little ROI available to invest significantly more money on live production staff and equipment.
The "ones that want to watch" are not necessarily or strictly existing fans or those at the track. There is no need for a viral link to social media or does it matter that a Super Bowl game is many hours away. It's the concept of quality (yes, I realize that this is rarely stressed or valued anymore) LIVE productions here in American where this is infinitely more possible with today's relatively much less inexpensive technology. If you can't fill dead air or read car#s/tell back stories instantly/off of the top of your head for a few hours then you are obviously being distracted by other tasks that even volunteers would be glad to help with remotely.

compare this livestream to what is available for Baja. Not even the same league, right? These are vehicles traversing incredibly remote mountain formations in the desert in the middle of nowhere. And all these key spots are live in my living room. I wish they were giving more detailed running order updates, but the nature of the sport makes that difficult anyway. I’m just glad for what we have.
Baja is not America nor will it ever be. Glad for what we have, sure, as I already indicated. Just not interested in being "fair" when the rare chance arises to promote the sport during the most important races of the year. Not faulting the announcers but just came away with the impression that they were not given the tools that they needed to put on the best production that they could have with that much at stake. Live coverage is everything with so much competition in social media for everybody to be smarter than the next guy every single second and the uncensored cravings out there.
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
Itsyourlegacy,
Im assuming you are willing to come out and volunteer your time. See you tomorrow. We are going again.
Dave
Believe it or not, the entire world reading this forum does not live near, recreate near nor have the funds to...never mind.
I offered an observation very nicely (I thought) that will likely change the next premier UTV event/class production for the better *and/or* squeeze even more inside knowledge out of those willing to share it during the race should somebody (manufactures/sponsors) decide that production assistance to these obviously overworked volunteers is of more or equal value to the sport as the high dollar/highly polished commercials stuck in between this work obviously are.

Edit: I see that I am talking to the promoter. If you disagree with any of the above or if manufacturers/sponsors are strictly interested in pushing commercials to us versus quality-wise supporting the fastest growing segment of offload (period) for next to nothing per the professional or volunteer production support described, please educate us. Teams racing and their families/supporters enjoy hearing about themselves when they appear on camera and we hate dead air (period) when we're witnessing a helicopter capturing footage that (largely) ends up on the cutting room floor.
Just my $.02
 
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ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
...was there somebody else in the 2nd place car as it rolled down the hill/over his foot?
Where can we find the archived footage of the race for those hoping to catch it later or does "Livestream" mean only that?
 

Jeff Furrier

Well-Known Member
ADVERTISER
I was at KOH until Saturday night, headed back tomorrow. I'll say for the the lifetime off off road events I've attended or participated in, this by far is the most impressive from every aspect. From the registration process, to the miles of power cables, multiple stages, vendor booths, security guards and volunteers boggled my mind from an organizational and logistics stand point.

I was hanging around tech for the first few days looking at the cars and safety set ups, and the overall tech process. I'd say for sure that KOH has the most legit tech process (and advisers) of any off road sanction, they should be the benchmark for the future in off road racing. The safety specs make sense, they're not arbitrary rules stolen from other rule books.

One of my favorite the quotes from a KOH tech advisers was "Its our job to keep you safe, its your job to read the rule book"

I'll be around from Wednesday on this week, I'll be the guy in the UPR shirt checking out cars asking lots of questions...Hit me up if you need anything.
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
AND never scrape off any previous tech inspection stickers off your rig, after two or3, tech inspection goes much smooother...thank you again volunteers
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
ItsYourLegacy

hope this link works
Thanks for sharing. My post (#50) above is answered at 2 hours; 57 min. 30 sec.
Drvier is obviously lucky that he's alive and that no one else on the course was affected by what should be a penalized rule violation at the very least or (imo) more.
 
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ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
I'd say for sure that KOH has the most legit tech process (and advisers) of any off road sanction, they should be the benchmark for the future in off road racing. The safety specs make sense, they're not arbitrary rules stolen from other rule books.
One of my favorite the quotes from a KOH tech advisers was "Its our job to keep you safe, its your job to read the rule book"
Good to hear and quite the compliment. All we need now sport-wide is redundant cameras in the cars with prohibitive penalties for missing footage...and guess what? The 'job' of reading the rule book pertaining to the course as well becomes (somehow) much easier.
 

stephenrjking

Well-Known Member
Not really in to 'fair' (not a term that us old folk are used to hearing or using) nor talking about a tape delay tv package that hasn't been produced as of yet given that the race just ended 5 minutes ago.

The "ones that want to watch" are not necessarily or strictly existing fans or those at the track. There is no need for a viral link to social media or does it matter that a Super Bowl game is many hours away. It's the concept of quality (yes, I realize that this is rarely stressed or valued anymore) LIVE productions here in American where this is infinitely more possible with today's relatively much less inexpensive technology. If you can't fill dead air or read car#s/tell back stories instantly/off of the top of your head for a few hours then you are obviously being distracted by other tasks that even volunteers would be glad to help with remotely.

Baja is not America nor will it ever be. Glad for what we have, sure, as I already indicated. Just not interested in being "fair" when the rare chance arises to promote the sport during the most important races of the year. Not faulting the announcers but just came away with the impression that they were not given the tools that they needed to put on the best production that they could have with that much at stake. Live coverage is everything with so much competition in social media for everybody to be smarter than the next guy every single second and the uncensored cravings out there.
Respectfully:

I think you and I both want the same thing: Accessible, quality broadcasts of off-road events that we enjoy.

Here's the problem: You are frustrated with what you have, but you seem to have no real idea of what is realistically possible. You are describing a high-quality live broadcast, suitable not just for streaming but for television (whether you actually want it on tv or not, that's the only reason to go to such effort). To my knowledge there is no such product for any off road race anywhere. As stated earlier, Baja (you argue that it's not America, but that is irrelevant; it is the pinnacle of off road racing) has no such product. Short Course, which has a tremendous advantage in that it takes place in a much smaller location, has no such product. BITD produces no such product.

The simple fact is that there is no realistic way for off road races to be broadcast live at a quality level suitable for television. Short course is the only format that is realistic from the standpoint of physical scope, but its schedule makes it a poor choice for live coverage. Larger events like KOH, Baja, and such cover such enormous ground that the logistical challenge of producing coverage is prohibitive for the economics of the sport.

To my knowledge, the only sports that are broadcast live that are comparable in scale to long-course off road racing are cycling and WRC. Both of them require immense production crews (WRC's production staff exceeds 100 people), a massive investment in vehicles and technology, and have much larger markets to broadcast to. And this huge outflow of money takes place before you've even acquired a minute of airtime on tv, which is the only way to gain the eyeballs that could make such an undertaking worthwhile.

I would LOVE quality live productions of off road events. But off road racing is a sport that occupies a small niche. It does not make much money at all; its promoters must be wise in how they spend their money. You hand-waved away the tape-delay production, but in so doing you are ignoring the issue: KOH has limited resources to produce quality programming, and it has chosen, just as BITD, SCORE, LOORRS, and the smoldering corpse of TORC, to focus on producing quality programs that can be aired (at cost) in one-hour time slots on broadcast television.

Meanwhile, they still provide livestream footage that is actually pretty good. Yeah, they could have more features, and I hope they get them, but it is what it is. Even a broadcast with ten times the staff is going to struggle with intermittent camera coverage, failing tracking devices, and the chaos of a live event spread over hundreds of miles of track in a region specifically suited for the event by its remoteness.

I dream of watching the Baja 1000 or KOH or Crandon live with the same quality as the 24 hours of Le Mans or the Tour de France. I even have some ideas on how stuff can improve (starting with getting teams to agree to allow and equip their chase helicopters to transmit live footage for a live broadcast). But we follow a sport that is just plain tough to produce live, with virtually no money available to improve the situation. Perhaps show a little more grace to those who work to put this stuff on, and be glad that there is so much that we CAN watch.

One area where I do agree with you is that I like hearing people who love and know the sport talk about the sport like they know it. You've probably watched the Fishgistics race recap shows; those feature guys who know the sport talking about it. The problem, of course, is that the guys who are capable of that are already on course, racing. Broadcasting live is tough work.
 

wheeli

Funny Guy from the North, eh
anyone can help out my buddies on the lakebed looking for Ls parts they are at 220 genright or ladd1. 154.00
flying zuccinni bros racing from canada Chris Stephens and Curtis Warrner plz/thx
 

ItsYourLegacy

Well-Known Member
Respectfully:
I think you and I both want the same thing: Accessible, quality broadcasts of off-road events that we enjoy.
I'm more interested in the minimum product afforded given the volunteer or paid staff not only already there but in recruiting others even remotely willing to help.
the problem: You are frustrated with what you have, but you seem to have no real idea of what is realistically possible.
Let me enlighten you: ANYTHNG is possible and already affordable when you're being live fed from a heliicopter and you are the only car class on the course. Please don't insult our collective intelligence by giving us steak and then trying to convince us all that iit was hamburger after we burp loudly and compliment the host.
You are describing a high-quality live broadcast, suitable not just for streaming but for television (whether you actually want it on tv or not, that's the only reason to go to such effort).
We just witnessed two guys, in stunning detail,l in the middle of the desert with nobody around, attempt to roll back over a full blown race car on a slope and almost lose both their lives attempting it. If that isn't a high quality live broadcast save any immediate cautionary commentary or everybody acting like nothing happened at that instance afterwards...we have no idea what is. Helicopter feeds, split action screens, remote reporting capabilities...sorry...but you just witnessed what you somehow claim now that you dd not.

To my knowledge there is no such product for any off road race anywhere. As stated earlier, Baja (you argue that it's not America, but that is irrelevant; it is the pinnacle of off road racing) has no such product. Short Course, which has a tremendous advantage in that it takes place in a much smaller location, has no such product. BITD produces no such product.
:)...You are making my point. As for producing anything in Mexico versus America? Not even worth explaining twice.

The simple fact is that there is no realistic way for off road races to be broadcast live at a quality level suitable for television. Short course is the only format that is realistic from the standpoint of physical scope, but its schedule makes it a poor choice for live coverage. Larger events like KOH, Baja, and such cover such enormous ground that the logistical challenge of producing coverage is prohibitive for the economics of the sport.
Short course "schedule times" don't mean a hill of beans and you didn't just watch the same very expensive production complete with copter coverage that I just did.

The only sports that are broadcast live that are comparable in scale to long-course off road racing are cycling and WRC. Both of them require immense production crews (WRC's production staff exceeds 100 people), a massive investment in vehicles and technology, and have much larger markets to broadcast to. And this huge outflow of money takes place before you've even acquired a minute of airtime on tv, which is the only way to gain the eyeballs that could make such an undertaking worthwhile.
That bird flew on Sunday along with a corresponding production crew doing the best job that they could with what they had because 1) They were all already there/set up for the big boy toy race and 2) UTVs are no 'joke' anymore in the offload market. They dd a great job with what they had and anyone who watched that race knew that they needed only a little more help without spending significant money to make that production a whole lot better for the advancement of the sport. If we don't take advantage of the biggest race of the year to shine (and I strongly believe that this race encapsulates that fever) flashy commercials in between paint a stark contrast that isn't flattering.

I would LOVE quality live productions of off road events. But off road racing is a sport that occupies a small niche. It does not make much money at all; its promoters must be wise in how they spend their money. You hand-waved away the tape-delay production, but in so doing you are ignoring the issue:
The tape delay production will not highlight the cars that we love nor the average people buying them which is how road racing started if you are old enough to remember. If you are, you will remember that the sport started small with poor production, no helicopters, split screen acton shots or remote reporters scattered everywhere.

KOH has limited resources to produce quality programming, and it has chosen, just as BITD, SCORE, LOORRS, and the smoldering corpse of TORC, to focus on producing quality programs that can be aired (at cost) in one-hour time slots on broadcast television.
They just flew a very expensive bird allowing the unwashed masses a glimpse at what the KOH can truly be for the little guy or college engineering team hoping to make a name for themselves in the premier race of the land involving bad ass builds. I thank them for that, certainly don't begrudge their bling show and hope that they continue to improve the live version with even remote help to match the bling commercials (period).

Meanwhile they still provide livestream footage that is actually pretty good. Yeah, they could have more features, and I hope they get them, but it is what it is. Even a broadcast with ten times the staff is going to struggle with intermittent camera coverage, failing tracking devices, and the chaos of a live event spread over hundreds of miles of track in a region specifically suited for the event by its remoteness.
The commentators need help (period). Nobody is bitching about the problems with live coverage as commentators fed properly overcome this by second nature. Volunteer ears/eyes on the ground and the simple back story of every machine/driver out there fills any dead air for that amount of time.

I dream of watching the Baja 1000 or KOH or Crandon live with the same quality as the 24 hours of Le Mans or the Tour de France. I even have some ideas on how stuff can improve (starting with getting teams to agree to allow and equip their chase helicopters to transmit live footage for a live broadcast). But we follow a sport that is just plain tough to produce live, with virtually no money available to improve the situation. Perhaps show a little more grace to those who work to put this stuff on, and be glad that there is so much that we CAN watch.
They need your ideas, the money was there/spent and I've shown grace to the extent that I have took the time to say what others apparently won't. We don't need spit shined/polished productions nor better commentators. We need to remove dead air and keep those doing their best to perform their lines in real time. Pretty simple when a helicopter crew is risking their lives/trying 'their' best to give us the shot.

One area where I do agree with you is that I like hearing people who love and know the sport talk about the sport like they know it. You've probably watched the Fishgistics race recap shows; those feature guys who know the sport talking about it. The problem, of course, is that the guys who are capable of that are already on course, racing. Broadcasting live is tough work.
I realize that this is blasphemy...yet there are plenty of guys and gals out there who (heaven forbid) are not necessarily 'race drivers' (an arrogance that has been a perpetual problem on the forums) who are more than capable of live broadcasting this sport in an extremely capable manner. What has killed this sport n terms of community more than anything over the years (especially in the West) is this concept of just the opposite when we get together in so many ways. 'Relatable' is what drove American road racing from its very beginings and we have unfortunately witnessed very little of this save for many East Coast racers to date. Hard fact but the truth.
 
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