2020 SCORE Baja 1000 Live Stream, Tracking and Updates

stephenrjking

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??? On the Score App it shows them on RM 680 at 10:16 am that is almost 3 hrs ago , that is why i am asking for any info or update on them
Tracker just popped back on for them. Stopped just before that 90 degree left turn at ~620. No idea how long they've been there. Obviously, further than when their tracker disengaged, but... not all that far.
 

mig29

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Good run Luke, congrats to the Blue M team!

Congrats Luke McMillin!

View attachment 220193

Stoked for Rob and Josh. Great run for those guys. Rob’s been overdue for a solid podium.

I called it -- "3 way Trophy Dash to the finish":

Luke McM TT #83, Ampudia TT #10, RobMac TT #11

I mentioned how Ampudia TT #10 was showing VERY aggressive driving (arguably the best for Baja 1K) -- really fine

"Spirit of the Attack"

which they also showed at last year's Baja 1K.. They should get a "Senna award" for this:

" "If you no longer go for a gap which exists you are no longer a racing driver"
-- Ayrton Senna

Unfortunately, they wrecked at a G-out while pursuing TT #83

That left RobMac to chase-down Luke..anybody know how far back he finished?

I was secretly pulling for Rob, he's been DUE. Just like Luke. I'm a BIG fan of his Rick Mears type of Strategy:

"Saving the car, staying within striking distance of the leaders, making a strong move at the Finish"

"What's my BACKDOOR!!"
-- RobMac, recent San Felipe 250 win

[ shouting into the radio to his crew-chief (requesting splits, i.e. how much time does he have to makeup for P1) ]

"To be successful, to SURVIVE, one had to have PHysical Endurance, dexterity, excellent eyesight, good marksmanship, & quick reflexes. No wonder the top WWI pilots were athletes, hunters, or even RACE CAR DRIVERS [ Eddie Rickenbacker, top scoring AMerican Ace 26 kills, who raced Indy 500 ]"
-- Lt Randy Cunningham US Navy, VIetnam Ace (flying F4 Phantom, my Dad was involved with the design -- anhedral elevators), graduate of USN Top Gun school (Navy Fighter Pilots Weapons School), "TOP GUN: THE STORY BEHIND THE STORY"/1988.

"The Real Top Gun" Youtube video, MUST SEE:


"I'd like to pass along the lessons learned in Vietnam.

From the earliest days of flying, The Spirit of the Attack [ e.g. Ampudia TT in '19 & '20 Baja 1K ] has carried the fight in Aerial Combat. No matter how primitive (or sophisticated) the aircraft, it's the AGGRESSIVENESS & ability of the pilot was the thing that keeps him alive

Germany's Manfred von Richtofen shot down 80 Allied pilots.
...
To be successful, to SURVIVE, one had to have PHysical Endurance, dexterity, excellent eyesight, good marksmanship, & quick reflexes. No wonder the top WWI pilots were athletes, hunters, or even RACE CAR DRIVERS [ Eddie Rickenbacker, top scoring AMerican Ace 26 kills, who raced Indy 500 ]

In WWII, German pilots initially had the advantage in TRAINING [ the German way! ] & Experiene [ Spanish CIvil War ]. The kill-ratios over the British were staggering"
-- Lt Randy Cunningham

^^^ The kill-ratios fell to 2:1 (over samller/more manueverable Russian built Mig 17, Mig 19, Mig 21), which created concern. US Navy responded with *enhanced* training (Naval Weapons FIghter School aka "Top Gun"), while US AIr Force "upped" their hardware (weapons, incl external gun rack). US Navy had the BETTER response:

"It matters not the Box, but the pilot in the Box"
-- Manfred von Richtofen, top scoring WWI ace (80 victories)

^^^ well known maxim in AUto Racing, as epitomized by Larry Roeseler (Baja 1K King, 14 titles with his 2020 TT win w/Luke McMilliin)


It's the tactic used heavily in WWII fighter dogfighting -- Russian, American, German, British, etc

"coming out of the Sun [ the victim NEVER knew what hit him ]"
-- David McCampbell, US Navy F6F Hellcat ace, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient


"All available fighter pilots! Man your planes!" boomed the squawk box in Essex' ready room. The ship's radar had detected three large groups of Japanese planes coming in.

David McCampbell, the CAG and the Navy's most famous living aviator, considered this announcement. Earlier that morning, Admiral Sherman himself had forbidden McCampbell from joining a dawn sortie. Given his responsibilities as Commander of Essex' Air Group and his public prominence as a top ace, McCampbell was too valuable. He decided that he was indeed "available" and headed for his airplane, Minsi III. His plane crew hurried to fuel Minsi III, which had not been scheduled to fly that day. With the Hellcat only partially fueled, the Flight Officer ordered it off the flight deck - either into the air or below to the hangar deck. McCampbell went up, leading Essex's last seven fighters toward the Jap strike force.

He and Ens. Roy Rushing got out in front of the other Hellcats, putting on all speed to intercept the Japs, then only 22 miles away. He directed the other F6F's to get the bombers, while he and Rushing tackled the fighters. Surprisingly, the enemy fighters turned, allowing McCampbell and Rushing to gain altitude and a position behind them.

THe so-called Commanding Heights (military term for defensive tactic), also used in Business School (Sun Tzu "Art of War" is taught at ALL leading American business-schools)


Diving on your opponent, leveraging:

1) Speed

2) opponent likely UNAWARE

was used by ALL WWI/WWII pilots. Pappy Boyington


[ WWII F4U Corsair pilot, broke Eddie Rickenbacker's WWI record of 26 victories, Congressional Medal of Honor ]
The "Black Sheep" fought their way to fame in just 84 days, piling up a record 197 planes destroyed or damaged, troop transports and supply ships sunk, and ground installations destroyed in addition to numerous other victories. They flew their first combat mission on September 14, 1943, escorting Dauntless dive bombers to Ballale, a small island west of Bougainville where the Japanese had a heavily fortified airstrip. They encountered heavy opposition from the enemy Zeros. Two days later, in a similar raid, 'Pappy’ claimed five kills, his best single day total. In October VMF-214 moved up from their original base in the Russells to a more advanced location at Munda. From here they were closer to the next big objective -- the Jap bases on Bougainville. On one mission over Bougainville, according to Boyington’s autobiography, the Japanese radioed him in English, asking him to report his position and so forth. Pappy played along, but stayed 5000 feet higher than he had told them, and when the Zeros came along, the Black Sheep blew twelve of them away. (The absolute veracity of Boyington’s autobiography is not certain, but that’s how he told the story.)

^^^ illustrates the ADVANTAGE of height, in diving on your enemy opponent..

"You coach to your players STRENGTHS"
-- NCAA basketball

He used this tactic while flying for AVG (American Volunteer Group..aka "Flying Tigers") in China against Japanese fighters. The heavier (also less manueverable) P-40 was used for "diving attacks", then speed away. Japanese Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero lightened the aircraft (no armor protection for pilot, no self-sealing fuel tanks, etc), which was already manueverable, gave it a nimble advantage (tighter turns)

While flying the F4U Corsair in WWII (Solomon Islands, "The Slot"), he would always check for potential "out of the sun" attacks, by ALWAYS checking his rear -- using his thumb to block-out-the-sun

"Watch your back" defensive tactic. Wingman covers you -- "I got your back" is another defensive tactic.

Pappy was under great DURESS in tying Rickenbacker's WWI total of 26 victories. On that fateful day, he tied..then BROKE Rickenbacker's record.

"You got a FLAMER Pappy!!"
-- Pappy's wingman

Unfortunately, they PRESSED the issue (violating "Risk Management") -- Pappy's wingman was shot down (& killed). Pappy was shot down (engine exploded) & picked up by Japanese submarine (POW for the rest of the war)

NOTE:
von Richtofen also made a mistake like Boyington, pressing an attack too far -- pursuing an "easy mark" over enemy lines. He was recipient of a fatal "lucky shot" (ground-based they think..). Even the top pilots/racers make mistakes!

^^^ There are lessons in above spiel:

1) Pilot/racer aggressiveness
key to advantage over your opponent

2) Risk Management
running a SMART race (saving your equipment in defensive "SURVIVE" mode), making a BIG push at the end for Victory ("kill" in fighter pilot slang). DON"T put yourself at risk, or you will get a DNF (or injury/death)

3) understanding your aircraft (or race-car)
staying with its limits, leveraging its *advantage* over you opponents "box" (weaknesses & strengths). German WWII soldiers (infantry, anti-tank crews, tank crews, fighter pilots) were RENOWNED for SUPERIOR training. E.g. Michael Wittman (Tiger ace), Otto Carius (Tiger ace), Kurt Knipsiel (Tiger ace), etc. See pic, unknown German "Iron Cross" recipient Eastern Front (Russia), likely a Tiger commander. Michael Wittman didn't survive the war, got ambushed in Normandy by a Canadian Sherman Firefly (enhanced British 17 pounder armor penetrating gun). Kurt Knispel (Hunting Tiger aka Jagd Tiger) also was killed in later days of WWII (Czechoslovakia), by Russian infantry? Otto Carius survived the war, he was actually shot *multiple* times by Russian infantry..but SURVIVED!

"Imagine living & dying -- if you win, you live. If you lose..you die"
-- Capt Steve Ritchie, US Air Force Vietnam ace (flying F4 Phantom) like Randy Cunningham US Navy

Offroad Racing (& Motorsports in general) has a "blood sport" aspect to it. Racing Glory is amazing, but at the price of injury (or death). Fighter Pilot combat is pretty cutthroat -- the weakest get culled out pretty quick!

"The people who got wiped out, got WIPED OUT.."
-- Black soldier (infantry), Vietnam documentary

It always amazes me how Offroad Races avoid deaths (most of the time). There are periodic injuries (some fatalities). Race teams resemble "military campaigns" in the resources, leadership, race support, etc. "War stories" of their race efforts are simply AMAZING..

See Ivan Stewart's great quote:

"One of my strengths in Racing, was understand & PROTECTING the equipment"
-- Ivan Stewart
 

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Bredbaker

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I called it -- "3 way Trophy Dash to the finish":

Luke McM TT #83, Ampudia TT #10, RobMac TT #11

I mentioned how Ampudia TT #10 was showing VERY aggressive driving (arguably the best for Baja 1K) -- really fine

"Spirit of the Attack"

which they also showed at last year's Baja 1K.. They should get a "Senna award" for this:

" "If you no longer go for a gap which exists you are no longer a racing driver"
-- Ayrton Senna

Unfortunately, they wrecked at a G-out while pursuing TT #83

That left RobMac to chase-down Luke..anybody know how far back he finished?

I was secretly pulling for Rob, he's been DUE. Just like Luke. I'm a BIG fan of his Rick Mears type of Strategy:

"Saving the car, staying within striking distance of the leaders, making a strong move at the Finish"

"What's my BACKDOOR!!"
-- RobMac, recent San Felipe 250 win

[ shouting into the radio to his crew-chief (requesting splits, i.e. how much time does he have to makeup for P1) ]

"To be successful, to SURVIVE, one had to have PHysical Endurance, dexterity, excellent eyesight, good marksmanship, & quick reflexes. No wonder the top WWI pilots were athletes, hunters, or even RACE CAR DRIVERS [ Eddie Rickenbacker, top scoring AMerican Ace 26 kills, who raced Indy 500 ]"
-- Lt Randy Cunningham US Navy, VIetnam Ace (flying F4 Phantom, my Dad was involved with the design -- anhedral elevators), graduate of USN Top Gun school (Navy Fighter Pilots Weapons School), "TOP GUN: THE STORY BEHIND THE STORY"/1988.

"The Real Top Gun" Youtube video, MUST SEE:


"I'd like to pass along the lessons learned in Vietnam.

From the earliest days of flying, The Spirit of the Attack [ e.g. Ampudia TT in '19 & '20 Baja 1K ] has carried the fight in Aerial Combat. No matter how primitive (or sophisticated) the aircraft, it's the AGGRESSIVENESS & ability of the pilot was the thing that keeps him alive

Germany's Manfred von Richtofen shot down 80 Allied pilots.
...
To be successful, to SURVIVE, one had to have PHysical Endurance, dexterity, excellent eyesight, good marksmanship, & quick reflexes. No wonder the top WWI pilots were athletes, hunters, or even RACE CAR DRIVERS [ Eddie Rickenbacker, top scoring AMerican Ace 26 kills, who raced Indy 500 ]

In WWII, German pilots initially had the advantage in TRAINING [ the German way! ] & Experiene [ Spanish CIvil War ]. The kill-ratios over the British were staggering"
-- Lt Randy Cunningham

^^^ The kill-ratios fell to 2:1 (over samller/more manueverable Russian built Mig 17, Mig 19, Mig 21), which created concern. US Navy responded with *enhanced* training (Naval Weapons FIghter School aka "Top Gun"), while US AIr Force "upped" their hardware (weapons, incl external gun rack). US Navy had the BETTER response:

"It matters not the Box, but the pilot in the Box"
-- Manfred von Richtofen, top scoring WWI ace (80 victories)

^^^ well known maxim in AUto Racing, as epitomized by Larry Roeseler (Baja 1K King, 14 titles with his 2020 TT win w/Luke McMilliin)


It's the tactic used heavily in WWII fighter dogfighting -- Russian, American, German, British, etc

"coming out of the Sun [ the victim NEVER knew what hit him ]"
-- David McCampbell, US Navy F6F Hellcat ace, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient




THe so-called Commanding Heights (military term for defensive tactic), also used in Business School (Sun Tzu "Art of War" is taught at ALL leading American business-schools)


Diving on your opponent, leveraging:

1) Speed

2) opponent likely UNAWARE

was used by ALL WWI/WWII pilots. Pappy Boyington


[ WWII F4U Corsair pilot, broke Eddie Rickenbacker's WWI record of 26 victories, Congressional Medal of Honor ]


^^^ illustrates the ADVANTAGE of height, in diving on your enemy opponent..

"You coach to your players STRENGTHS"
-- NCAA basketball

He used this tactic while flying for AVG (American Volunteer Group..aka "Flying Tigers") in China against Japanese fighters. The heavier (also less manueverable) P-40 was used for "diving attacks", then speed away. Japanese Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero lightened the aircraft (no armor protection for pilot, no self-sealing fuel tanks, etc), which was already manueverable, gave it a nimble advantage (tighter turns)

While flying the F4U Corsair in WWII (Solomon Islands, "The Slot"), he would always check for potential "out of the sun" attacks, by ALWAYS checking his rear -- using his thumb to block-out-the-sun

"Watch your back" defensive tactic. Wingman covers you -- "I got your back" is another defensive tactic.

Pappy was under great DURESS in tying Rickenbacker's WWI total of 26 victories. On that fateful day, he tied..then BROKE Rickenbacker's record.

"You got a FLAMER Pappy!!"
-- Pappy's wingman

Unfortunately, they PRESSED the issue (violating "Risk Management") -- Pappy's wingman was shot down (& killed). Pappy was shot down (engine exploded) & picked up by Japanese submarine (POW for the rest of the war)

NOTE:
von Richtofen also made a mistake like Boyington, pressing an attack too far -- pursuing an "easy mark" over enemy lines. He was recipient of a fatal "lucky shot" (ground-based they think..). Even the top pilots/racers make mistakes!

^^^ There are lessons in above spiel:

1) Pilot/racer aggressiveness
key to advantage over your opponent

2) Risk Management
running a SMART race (saving your equipment in defensive "SURVIVE" mode), making a BIG push at the end for Victory ("kill" in fighter pilot slang). DON"T put yourself at risk, or you will get a DNF (or injury/death)

3) understanding your aircraft (or race-car)
staying with its limits, leveraging its *advantage* over you opponents "box" (weaknesses & strengths). German WWII soldiers (infantry, anti-tank crews, tank crews, fighter pilots) were RENOWNED for SUPERIOR training. E.g. Michael Wittman (Tiger ace), Otto Carius (Tiger ace), Kurt Knipsiel (Tiger ace), etc. See pics, incl unknown German "Iron Cross" recipient Eastern Front -- selfie with Russian JS2 heavy tank), likely a Tiger commander

See Ivan Stewart's great quote:

"One of my strengths in Racing, was understand & PROTECTING the equipment"
-- Ivan Stewart
I got to meet Pappy Boynton several times when I was a teenager. Every year he would come to the Chino Air Show and sit at a table and sell and autograph his book. He could spin a great tale, usually when he was flying in China. My autographed copy was destroyed in a leaky storage unit. And now, back to Baja.....
 

Tube ride

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There is a good friendly rivalry between 2930 and 2909 driver of 2909 used to be cod river in 2930 I know he’s driving his guts out trying to get em ! Oh snap Alex just got around him 50 mile blood bath to the finish
 
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Zambo

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Where did Ampudia start in relation to Luke? Did he have to pass him to get the win?

I remember one year we were in the dust of either Josh or Chad Hall coming thru Ojos on the way to the finish of the 1000, maybe 2009 or so? Anyway our truck was easily within the time gap but we hit a hole in the dust and broke the front end. All we had to do was stay close to get the win so it was pretty depressing.
 

stephenrjking

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Where did Ampudia start in relation to Luke? Did he have to pass him to get the win?

I remember one year we were in the dust of either Josh or Chad Hall coming thru Ojos on the way to the finish of the 1000, maybe 2009 or so? Anyway our truck was easily within the time gap but we hit a hole in the dust and broke the front end. All we had to do was stay close to get the win so it was pretty depressing.
He started right behind Luke, had to finish within a minute of him. He was down something like 5? Anyway, close enough to think that there was a chance.
 

Vista Racing

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The Class12 guys are having a shootout at the finish. 1218 and 1205 have traded the lead a few times new from Ojos on the way in. Looks like 1218 has it but you never know...
 

Curtis Guise

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He started right behind Luke, had to finish within a minute of him. He was down something like 5? Anyway, close enough to think that there was a chance.
Yeah #10 had to be within 1 minute and he was about 5 minutes back for along time. Did anyone hear what happened to Ampudia to make them stop around 40 miles before the finish? Did they roll?

 

Andre

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anyone know who is behind the wheel of the bronco ? Land cruiser and G wagon still clipping along !
It would be cool if Cameron pulled up in the 2021.

If he does, he will have to take the mike from her and interview himself.
 
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