2wd ibeam f150 vs 4wd ibeam f150

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
Joined
Dec 31, 1969
Posts
5,788
RDC Crypto
8
Im so sick of my chevy and want to sell it. I have wanted to get a pre 96 f150 for a while now. I love 4wd and would want to get a 4wd f150 but am wondering of the limitations I might face as far as suspension work. I want to build a daily driven f150 from bumper to bumper for the desert. What are some cons of the i beam 4wd f150's compared to the i beam 2wd f150's besides cost?
What can I expect out of both as far as usable wheel travel? How much more (estimate) could it cost to build a 4x4 f150?
Sorry jeff had to post twice.
Whats the hp/tq for the 92-96 5.8L fords?
 

Chris_Wilson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2001
Posts
3,322
RDC Crypto
1,403
Location
Gilbert, AZ & San Felipe, Baja
I get 16" usable travel from my 4wd TTB bronco with coilovers and stock width. I get 18" from
my 4wd TTB F150 also with coilovers but also a widened front end. The limiting factor on both
trucks is the u-joint angle in the cross-over axle which limits droop. You can get more travel
at the expense of a higher ride height by dropping the ttb piviot points (like a lift kit) so you get
it to cycle up higher than it otherwise would. This raises the CG and I think it messes with the
roll center and makes for a less stable high speed platform but if all you want is wheel travel
you could get at least 20" with a tall truck. I think you will have a hard time getting more than
16" of travel with the stock spring bucket due to the limitiation of coil bind (especially with a long
coil on a lifted truck.) Both my trucks also have air bumps and the F150 also has a bypass shock.
It's plenty of travel and well worth it for the pleasures of a working 4wd system. And it's
bloody fast on graded roads. Go for the 4wd!
 

In_the_works

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Posts
305
RDC Crypto
1
Location
none
Gotta question, I have 6" drop brackets on my TTBs. Would this be a liability or an asset when going for long travel? Should I go back to the stock mounting locations if I wanted to get extended or bent beams, or would I get more width if I stuck with the drop brackets? I'm looking to get 15-16" of front travel.

'96 F-150 4x4 ex cab
'02 Maico 250
 

JrSyko

Jerry Maguire
Joined
Apr 8, 2001
Posts
7,890
RDC Crypto
1,611
Location
San Diego, CA
Chris -

Do you powder coat everything or is that painted? It looks exactly like the paint that the Navy uses on the inside of all its ships.

See ya in the dirt!
 

jeff

Moderator
Joined
Apr 1, 2001
Posts
7,455
RDC Crypto
355
Location
California
Website
www.performancelifts.com
Thanks for the pictures... and brace yourself for the onslaught of questions I'm about to throw your way:

Are those radius arms as long as they look in the pictures? Who did the beam modifications on the F-150 - the widening I mean. On the Bronco, do you have a shot of the radius arms installed so I can see just how far back those things go?

Anything else you care to share would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

Ryno

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2001
Posts
1,230
RDC Crypto
33
Location
Yucaipa, CA
Here's a monkeywrench for all of this. Take the chevy, and put the TTB's on it. I have seen it, and it works/ looks awesome, as well as kicks tail all over GM's IFS. You can get new rims, and then get any type of axle shaft flange for the rear to match. I've heard a figure of between 4-7k thrown around for the conversion, much much less if you do all the work yourself. Looks to me like the truck would be down for a while, put the parts are plentiful, and finding a wrecked TTB Dana 44 isn't that hard.

Ryno

Build it like a Rhino, and Leave it be.
 

jeff

Moderator
Joined
Apr 1, 2001
Posts
7,455
RDC Crypto
355
Location
California
Website
www.performancelifts.com
Why bother going to the hassle if you are buying a new (used) rig? Selling the Chevy as it is now seems like the wise idea... and then buying a cheapo Ford - take the money from the sale of the Chevy and put it all into the cheapo Ford. No sense trying to make chicken salad out of chicken you know what. Selling a Chevy for $10,000 (or whatever) and buy a Ford for $5000 (or whatever) - take the difference ($5000?) and then you are probably $10,000 ahead of the game versus the GM --> Ford conversion.

My uncle used to own a 2wd Blazer prerunner that had beams up front and was linked in the back. It worked bitchin... but it cost more to build and performed the same as a Ford. Unless you are just hung up on owning a Chevy (or get wood over a 383 and a TH400 combination), why not just build the Ford? More off-road stuff for the Ford and it's generally cheaper to boot.

Aloha
 

SDranger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2001
Posts
487
RDC Crypto
3
Location
San Diego, Ca
IN_the_works: You can get 15-16" no prob with stock length beams and id get rid of the drop brackets for sure, they put lots of stress on the frame and you truck will be a lot more stable if its lower

97 Ranger 4x4
02 CR125
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2002
Posts
6,794
RDC Crypto
1,628
Location
Easton, KS
If you lose the drop down brackets, you will have to space out the bottom ball joint to get proper camber at the same ride hight. 6" lift needs about .625 of spacing....
 

In_the_works

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Posts
305
RDC Crypto
1
Location
none
Would that require modification to the beam/spindle, or just making some kind of spacer to fit in the ball joint bore?

'96 F-150 4x4 ex cab
'02 Maico 250
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2002
Posts
6,794
RDC Crypto
1,628
Location
Easton, KS
Actually, you get out the sawzall, cut off the lower ball joint mount, insert a piece of material the right size and weld it up. Some plating wouldn't hurt either......
 
Top