4.56 vs. 4.88?

havahockey

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I'm planning on regearing in the next month and need to decide between 4.56 and 4.88. I've asked a few people but want to get some more input. Also what brands do you recomend?

I have a Tacoma 3.4L V6, Auto transmission, and 33x12.5x15 tires. I don't plan on moving up to a bigger tire.

Thanks in advance.

Race-Dezert Anonymous - Step #1:
"Hello, my name is Jason. And I'm a Race-Dezertaholic."
 

singlehanded

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I got 4.56 put in my ranger and its more than enough pushing 33 muds speedo reeds faster rather than slower as before so when I get my 35's it will be fine. I have a manual 4 litre. The pinion on that size is small. I would go to chrisman they have awsome prices and goo sh$t and they are in anahiem(it was close to me). I dont think you ned to go up to 4.88. Thats my opinion

P.S thanks for the bedside shots, it alittle more tricky with my setup since my rear shckles is going up, but I'll figure something out.

midnight landscaper working overtime and I'm full throttle I'm full throttle tonight
 

scott

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I'm running 4:86's also I have a V8 with 37's...... so with your Toyota probably higher gear would be better....I'd go 4:88's with a locker... Auburn Gear, Detroit....either or
 

orvacian

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I have the stock 4.56 ratio that came with the factory 31" tire option and it is not enough for 33's' 4.88 is right for toyota trucks with 33's. If I just drove my truck offroad I would put 5.10 gears in there!
If you had a v8 it would not matter as much.
 

yotatech

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i work at the local yota dealership and one of the techs has a 96 4runner with a 3.4 and an automatic trans. he has 456s in it and it workes greatfor him, any lower and the rpms might be to high on the street. if it was a four cylinder or an older v6 then i would go with the 488s, but its really up to you.
 

BlueCoyote

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For comparison:
Have a 86 4runner 22re, 33's and 4.56 - goes very well
Have a 84 truck w 22r , 33's and 4.88- not as well as the 4runner
Both are 22re long blocks, same cam, header, only difference is carb vs EFI. With the higher 3.4 V6 tork and a lower operating range, the 4.56 might be a better option. Would suggest using a RPM calculator to see where the ranges are.
As for brand avoid the low dollar ones - they are made overseas in a Baltic factory - poor QC. The only way they can give a life time warrentee is not due to high quality but low purchase cost.
The 84 has a V6 Precisoin Gear R&P and a Detroit. It has seen some very hard use in rokrawling, running in Baja, street driving, etc. After 3 years still no slop, noise, problems. The front is a Superior -same high quality.

Who are you calling Coyote ugly?
84 Toyota p/u Rokrawlr
86 4rnr
80 Toyota MDR Project
 

partybarge_pilot

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If you are going to be beating on it, the 4.88's are a stronger gear due to the tooth count on the pinion gear. The auto transmission's have a little taller OD than the sticks, Go with the 4.88's.
 

Kritter

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4.88s have a smaller pinion gear then 4.56s. The smallest gear is always your limitng factor. So the 4.56s would have a longer life then the 4.88s. Side note::::::::::When doing gear calcs...you usually only do the analysis on the smaller/est gear...if they can handle it then the rest of the train can handle it.

Kris
"Buy American before it's too late..."
 

partybarge_pilot

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Smaller In dia yes, less teeth = larger teeth = more strength.
I have broken 4.56's twice , 4.88's never. same truck, same rear end, same idiot driver....
 

Kritter

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That's bad luck or cheap gears or bad install. You will find most often (always actually) that the pinion gear or the smaller gear is hardened greater then the ring or larger gear or made of a higher strength material to overcome its smaller power rating! The amount of power a gear can withstand before failure when designing gears is directly proportional to the pitchline velocity which is then directly proportional to the diameter...hence the larger diameter gear will put up to more horsepower. HP = WtV/33000 where Wt is your tansmitted load, V is =pi*d*eta/12, 330000is your HP correction constant. You can use any of the AGMA gear stress calcs and they will tell you the same thing.On a side note, when buying gears...buy AMERICAN MADE gears. Majority import stuff is junk.

Kris
"Buy American before it's too late..."
 

partybarge_pilot

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All gears were Richmond units set-up by the same person. The problem was not in the set-up but in the right foot. The 4.56's have 11 teeth, 4.88's have 9. The dia % differance has less bearing on streangh than the root width of the teeth.

4.88 is roughly 7% smaller in dia than a 4.56.
The teeth are roughly 18% larger.
In this case where you dia.'s are so close togehter the tooth count has more bearing on the outcome than a 3.73 to 5.10 jump.
 

Kritter

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Larger teeth means more contact and more bending of the teeth. All I know is that the pinion is the gear that you design against failure and if done right the ring shouldnt fail first. We had 6.66s in our race truck and they would last one race and the pinion would be junk, but with 4.10s we get a season out of the R&P with only a prep every race.

Kris
"Buy American before it's too late..."
 

fly97ford

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If you have a V6, and do more than 50% on road driving, I'd recommend 4.56. If you have a 4 cyl. you'll need 4.88's.
 
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