4x4 IFS Front suspension idea

CanyonMan

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OK, I've got a crazy idea here for 4x4 IFS Chevy's and GMC's. Has anyone ever thought of making a Corvette IRS suspension work in one? I know you can buy killer steel half shafts for them. Get someone form High Angle driveline to make halfshafts for it, modify your hubs etc. I stayed awake all night last night thinking of suspension ideas for my 4x4 IFS. I think IFS can work for the common man, it just needs a bigger following (other than the "disco" crowd).

Lyrch
 

tkr

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It sure doesn't seem like it would be all that difficutl...for someone who knows what they're doing...t to use 930or934 cv's with longer axles and make up some longer a-arms, shock hoops, etc. If I had the knowledge and skills I would've done it 5 years ago when I bought my truck. I'm sure someone must have tried it by now!
Anyone?????

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

JrSyko

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Talk to the guys At Full Tilt, they are claiming 12" out of the GM IFS on the new H2's.

See ya in the dirt!
 

elcaprerunner

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How about this idea for 4X4 IFS S-10.........Make extended arms and all of that shiz......steering, brake lines, etc....... Make the arms wide enough to where you can use 4WD axles from a fullsize 4X4 Chevy. Would this work? This is the same idea as the TC "Caddy Kit" but for an S-10. The only thing I can think of is that the CV's might not be conmpatable with eachother (fullsize to S-10 i mean) Will this work? I can't be the first one who has thought of this.

DIRT'S FOR RACING, PRERUNNERS ARE FOR GETTING THERE!

H.O.R.E.
Hemet Off-Road Enthusiests
 

rdc

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What about the torsion bars? You now have the front halfshafts all custom fabbed up and the arms extended but what about the tbars? Do you think you could get those to function well? You could mount an offset coilover but thats alot of money. Also 2wd chevys are hard allready to make a custom long travel kit for so with the 4wd you just have more problems. I think ibeam swap would be the best idea for lots of usable travel and would be cheaper than mounting coilovers, extending arms, steering and fabbing up some halfshafts.
 

BlaZair

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Ive been thinking about this for a long time, and plan on doing something about it one of these days. Im thinking 930s w/ micro stubs, longer arms (3-5 inches) and custom axles. I am not sure about parts compatibility and such, but I have the running gear from ZR2 in the garage (bigger FWD wheel bearings and a 8.5" 10 bolt, 4 inches wider) and will be experimenting. I ve been e-mailing some one on this board who claims to cycle 14" on his S-10 4x with custom arms and extended stock axles. I am still waiting for the pictures.

Anyone know how much front travel the ex-MacPherson (Hardin) S-10 has, or how the front end is set up?

Thought about, but dont know squat about the Corvette or full-size swap.
 

tkr

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Now why would you want to go backward and take a perfectly good set of a-arms off and replace them with I-beams? If you're going to spend the money on 930 cv's, custom lenght axles, custom a-arms and probably custom uprights and spindles, why not go with coilovers?? If you're going to custom make an upper arm, how much more difficult would it be to design a j-arm instead?



Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

tkr

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I think Lil Mac had either 8 or 10 inches of front travel. Amazingly little considering how well in handled.

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

AaronDixon

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We are currently finishing up a 4wd long-travel suspension for the IFS F-150s. The kit cycles 14" of travel with a 2.5" coilover and a 2.5" bypass. Truck will be 8" wider using stock CV joints with new axles. The Upper A-arm features a vertical uni-ball and the A-arms bolt up to the stock pivots.
 

KitRacer

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i dont know how much travel you consider good, but i have thought of the same idea too. before you get to serious, cycle a 930 cv as i did, it may get 27 degrees before bind, but that is with the wheel straight, dont forget you have to be able to steer as sharp at full droop as you do at normal ride height. when you get all done, you are left with hardly any cv angle. i scratched the ides when i saw how little angle was available when steering became an issue. another issue is ground clearance, instead of the spindle hub being towards the bottom of the spindle, it now has to be in the middle to allow for the micro stub to go through it. now the whole arm is a lot lower. these are the reasons i ditched the idea.
on another note, how much travel did the front of that gray prerunner suberban cycle?
 

tkr

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The 4x4 IFS Ford isn't much different than the Chevy is it? Aaron do you have any pictures?

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

JrSyko

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Check out H&M website as they are currently building a F1 4x4 IFS long travel suspension that uses a bypass and a coilover. It is in the pictures section under "Vossey's prerunner."

See ya in the dirt!
 

FABRICATOR

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Nearly every front wheel drive and all-wheel-drive-capable vehicles in the world use Rezeppa joints (real CV joints). The Lobro style (930's, etc) will not provide enough angle for steering. The Rezeppa joint can go up to about 45 degrees with no problems. Like any joint, torque limits decrease when drive angle increases. The full size GM trucks have strong, high-angle Rezeppa joints.

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

tkr

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Wow, good to know. Thanks Fabricator. Is there some reason why we don't use the Rezeppa type joints in off-road. For example on the rear of an IRS buggy?

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

partybarge_pilot

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"The Lobro style (930's, etc) will not provide enough angle for steering."

They won't? I don't seem to have a problem getting enough angle out of them for steering. They have alot more travel than a stock one like a toyota.
 

rdc

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If the gm joints are so great then you can just get them machined so the joints clears at steeper angles. Where can you get that done?
 

FABRICATOR

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BTW, most of the world spells it Rezeppa however, it is also spelled Rzeppa...

RE: "Is there some reason why we don't use the Rezeppa type joints in off-road. For example on the rear of an IRS buggy?"

Yes, sheer laziness. Actually they do. People do not like to use these joints off-road because they do not conveniently provide any axle plunge (in and out axle movement). In all other ways they are superior. For a given diameter or angle, they are much stronger and cooler running. The OEM's do not use them for more than the outer axle joint because they are more expensive.


Re: "I don't seem to have a problem getting enough angle out of them for steering. They have alot more travel than a stock one like a toyota."

27* x 2 equals 54*... Most steering systems go around 70* to 80* some nearly 90*.


Re: "If the gm joints are so great then you can just get them machined so the joints clears at steeper angles. Where can you get that done?"

I'm not sure what you mean. Most Rezeppa joints do not need any clearance to run these angles. The angle limit is usually from the axle coming close to the outer shell. You can cut the axle down in that spot and this has been done. But this is usually for exceeding 45*.




<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

rdc

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"I'm not sure what you mean. Most Rezeppa joints do not need any clearance to run these angles. The angle limit is usually from the axle coming close to the outer shell. You can cut the axle down in that spot and this has been done. But this is usually for exceeding 45*. "

I heard from Greg (Sparky) at autostylz in Lake Forest that they could be machined some way to give you a few more degrees before they bind. Who would do this? Does it make it weaker?

What do you think of autostylz service, fabrication etc PM me.
 

ntsqd

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Try this link for some background on CV's: <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.rpsthompson.com/hisory_cvj.html>http://www.rpsthompson.com/hisory_cvj.html</A>
A google search on "Rzeppa Joint" turned up all kinds of info. Read the one from vernco.com, it has a couple amusing things in it. One site was a Citroen DS page.

I had always thot the Rzeppa joints, like Birfields, consisted of an inner radially grooved race, an outer radially grooved race and some balls; with the difference btwn them being that the Birfield's grooves were exactly radial while the Rzeppa's grooves were crossed. That is not the case.


TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 
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