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6100, TTspec, Baja Truck only thread

51rcr

Well-Known Member
My truck is just a bunch of used junk. welding the frame now then back together.
What does everyone prefer for a skid plate? One piece, or removable pieces for trans access ect? what material do you prefer?
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
Pretty sure our skid plates are 1/4” aluminum. We have 3 separate panels.

I just put a TM Designworks skid plates on my Honda 450x that’s thick plastic and it works really well. The plastic slides over rocks and does not grab like aluminum. would be interesting to either go all plastic or add plastic to the aluminum.

Mike
 

Ikaika

Active Member
My truck is just a bunch of used junk. welding the frame now then back together.
What does everyone prefer for a skid plate? One piece, or removable pieces for trans access ect? what material do you prefer?
I / We are building our first vehicle ( 6100 / TT Spec / Baja Truck ) and if there is one thing I've learned so far,.......there are both pros & cons to everything and multiple ways to reach a final assembly. ( the previous was definitely my disclaimer to the following )

We have opted for the "one piece" version.....with the thinking that a one piece plate would have greater capacity for contact / impact because it would "pull" ( from point of impact ) from a larger panel.......and........there would be less mounting bolts to contend with......the byproduct would be a slight weight savings.

In terms of transmission access.......our thinking is if the transmission "gives out" during an event, we would be so far out of contention ( NOT getting cocky and implying that we will be in contention ) that the little extra time it would take to remove a one piece panel vs a single center section to access the transmission would be the least of our concerns.

When the vehicle is in the "prep" stages, the time it takes to fiddle with a one piece panel is moot.......so.......we opted for a one piece panel for the reasons listed above.

Regarding material.....we chose 7075 T-6 due to it's properties & application.

Stay healthy & "bug-free" !!
 

notime

NTR Films media guy
Some video for This Friday Baja 500 2019 TT & Spec


 

MAC56

Well-Known Member
Pretty sure our skid plates are 1/4” aluminum. We have 3 separate panels.

I just put a TM Designworks skid plates on my Honda 450x that’s thick plastic and it works really well. The plastic slides over rocks and does not grab like aluminum. would be interesting to either go all plastic or add plastic to the aluminum.

Mike
Plastic burns.
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
Haha good point. But I wonder if it was under the aluminum panels if it would ever be burned?

but we are not going to experiment any more on our truck. Haha. Although I say that as we have the truck torn apart doing some mods while it’s getting prepped. We can’t just leave good enough alone.


Mike
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
LOL I was blown away by that guy that close. I showed my kids and my wife that part of the video as I thought it was so crazy. I get the feeling these guys have no idea how sketch these dirt roads can be at speed. I bet if they ever drove a truck like this they would never get that close. haha

Mike
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
New Air filter going into our truck. The one on the right is what we had, the one on the left is bigger LOL

Pretty excited about our new intake and filter system. Can't wait to get it on the dyno. We are machining a custom Velocity stack that goes in the filter for better flow and transition to the 4" intake tube.

IMG_0225.jpeg
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
Need to find the big filter that has the pleating of the small filter. size isnt everything.
you are right the small pleating Does flow better. Oiled gauze is the best flowing media, paper being the worst and synthetic media in between. The more surface area you have the better it flows as your not pulling as much thru the media and have lower velocity.
Oiled gauze also allows the most dirt thru. Paper and synthetic are better at filtering which means they both get clogged faster.

after all our testing on the dyno and research I believe Synthetic is the best over all choice if you have enough surface area.

what you can’t see in this photo is the larger filters pleats are 3x the depth of the smaller filters pleats. If you were to spread these filters out flat the larger one has 12x the surface of the smaller one.

that being said this is all a guess as we have not ran the new Slarger filter yet. Testing and ultimately the first race will tell us if we are right.

We are adding a MAP sensor in the filter so we can see if we create a vacuum at any time in the race or testing.

I try new things but we test and verify everything we do. Data matters.

the intake tube and velocity stack we are using will for sure be the best it can be. I think we will pick up at least 10hp from the tube and velocity stack alone.

hopefully we do not get less flow and less power with this larger new filter. It can’t flow better than our oiled gauze but it can flow worse. If it flows as good as it should then it will give us more flow at the end of the race as it can take more dust load.
Mike
 

Class10DAN

Well-Known Member

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
MG is right a properly tuned LS3 525 in a 6100 should get just above 3mpg. 3.5mpg is good.

we had our 430hp LS3 getting 4mpg

Our LT1 on E85 only got 2mpg at the m in Laughlin. At the Mint400 this year we got 2.7mpg.

that being said the terrain and course type plays a large roll in mpg. If it’s silty or sticky your mileage can go down. I wish is was a stable number as that would make fuel planning way easier.

I bet the fleet is getting on average 3mpg

Edit- I see the Brenthal claims above and I am surprised by that. If they are only getting 2mpg on race gas they have something wrong.

Mike
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
There isn’t any trash talking in this thread yet so I will start. Hehe

if the Brenthel g3 is using 2mpg of liquid power they sure are not putting it to the ground.

we lined up next to a brand new G3 at last years Mint 400. I thought oh man this guy is going to smoke us. Haha Nope.

this was the old 6100 rules. We went half way on one tank and I think we got 3.6 mpg.

Mike

 

cynicwanderer

Well-Known Member
fuel consumption depends on a lot of factors. driving style, gearing, terrain, etc... also, engines have different efficiencies at different load points/RPM. so at max power, it maybe not actually make the best power/fuel (specific power) consumption there. this maybe at a different RPM/load. so gear selection has a major role in loading the engine at different RPM. if you constantly stomp the gas and brake hard, you will not get the best mileage (obviously), but you might be faster in that section.

in order to drive smart, you need to know your engines, max horse power point, max torque point and best specific fuel consumption points for different loading, which will vary with different terrain styles. ideally, an automatic transmission controller could be tuned to pick the best gear for the a specific driving condition, based on what the desired optimization is (mileage, speed) at a given part of the course. this of course, assumes the engine/transmission/drivetrain is in best condition/efficiency already. ideally, you'd want a CVT for this if the inefficiencies outweigh the gains, and you can make it rugged to withstand off road racing. or a transmission with a lot of gears, with a spread optimized for a specific course. I.e. if you knew the max. top speed you plan to reach and the lowest speed you need for technical stuff.

a good driver can (used to be able to when things were less complex) do this in his/her head. obviously, the issue is the speed/fuel consumption trade off. i.e. at better mileage, you maybe going a tad slower, but won't have to pit as often (which saves time), but at higher speeds you can go farther in the same time. F1 has taken this (optimization) to the limit of technology available, and are now being limited by the rules more then anything.

I don't have a feel for how advanced some of the pro trophy truck teams are with their optimizations for speed/mileage in off road racing, if not there could be some significant gains for teams who are willing to figure this out for trophy trucks. of course, off road racing is so variable, that it's hard to be repeatable and predict. so even if you had the best running truck/strategy/optimization, some random event can change the outcome significantly, but I suspect over time some of the random events average out and you could be pretty consistent if you optimized.

much of this optimization can be learned through experience. I.e. with reference to the schooling vs hard knocks learning style thread. a veteran knows how to tune, select gears and drive smartly, because he/she adapted over time. I.e. build a truck based on "tried and true" and apply what you have learned but only incrementally try new things and then run for a while averaging out all the random effects that can happen.

I think the current thinking in trophy trucks is that overall speed over a variety of terrain is the winning solution, if you can make it reliable.
 
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