a-arm rear

Ryan B

Well-Known Member
Posts
356
Reaction
10
I know it would be quite expensive but do you guys and gals think an a-arm susp. on the rear of a fullsize truck hold up if it were done right tube chassis, good geometry, etc. I am seriously pondering doing this so any criticism would be greatly appreciated, thanks
 

JeffS

Well-Known Member
Posts
368
Reaction
0
It would only be as expensive as you make it. 2003 Expeditions have a-arms in the rear, and ride very smooth. Not great for long travel, but an f-150 uses the same frame.

If you're talking about Ranger size pickups, you can take the rear suspension from a current year explorer.

Either way, it's a good place to start if you don't have the money to copy the TT's that run rear a-arms.

It would be an interesting project....
 

Ryan B

Well-Known Member
Posts
356
Reaction
10
it's going to be a daily driven, and since in live right next to the desert i will be out there every day. I'm looking to get 18-20 inches front and rear so it's still pretty driveable on the street I don't expect it to handle like a porsche but I do want it to be very driveable.
 

1992f150

Well-Known Member
Posts
373
Reaction
0
afew months ago in the shop section there was a thread on someone who was toying around with the idea of building a truck IRS. He had a lincoln navigator setup but I think he decided to just 4 link it. try a search it should come up.
 

slimjim

Well-Known Member
Posts
249
Reaction
0
why a-arm rear?

to be different - okay.

to be cheaper - doubt it.

to be better off-road - doubt it, unless budget is unlimited.

so, why?
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Posts
5,147
Reaction
107
It will provide superior ride and traction than a solid axle having the same travel and differential. But it ain't easy.
 

martininsocal

Well-Known Member
Posts
22,828
Reaction
5
Won't be as bad as you think, just think outside the offroad box. Why run a Ford rear set-up when there are plenty of tried and true much stronger IRS set-ups. Try Corvette, Jaguar, etc... The Corvette would be easy to get parts for, probably not that expensive from a junk source(you are already spending money, I would guess this is cheaper than the" New" stuff from Dearborn. As for a-arms, Ivan ran them on his TT and did great. Or you could do a 5 link like the Vegas Dissemination cars run. Spicer axles won't be that difficult to get and will hold up to Hp.

Good Luck,
Martin
 

michael_loomis

Well-Known Member
Posts
26,214
Reaction
2,425
hmm have you guys ever seen the driveshaft section of an I/O outdrive on a boat? its got double u joints and get almost 90 degrees when running ... i wonder if that would hold up to off road abuse ?
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Posts
2,429
Reaction
27
The older Jag & Corvette IRS diffs are both Dana 44 varients. Newer stuff is probably different, wouldn't know.

I've two friends with 9 inch diffs in their Yota IFS'. One is centered under an '86+. Check Scott's Rockstomper.com pages as he may still have pics of that truck up on it. The other is a T-100 with the diff in the normal location. No known pics of it on the net. Currie told both of them that you can't build a 9 housing that narrow. Scott's has hundreds if not thousands of rockcrawling miles on his and the T-100 has thousands of Baja miles on it. To my knowledge neither has had even one problem.
I mention these to show that you can use what ever diff you want for IFS if you're willing to think about it a little.
 

orvacian

Well-Known Member
Posts
420
Reaction
1
Supra 87-92 independant rear diff has a limited slip stock and handles up to about 700hp. The output shaft flanges look exactly the same as the toyota 4x4 front diff so you could possibly get the porsche cv adaptors (made for the trucks) and run a cv and axle like a buggy. The Supra diff can be purchased for about $150 used.
 

tedmales

Well-Known Member
Posts
541
Reaction
10
if you wanted to get real trick, i would use a trans axel from a newer vette. could make for a real cool mid engine truck.
 

Harpo

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,019
Reaction
41
Probably one of the better setups is on the Bunderson built, ancient Valley Performance/John Gaughn car that BJ Baldwin now owns. Its a Ford 9" w/ huge CV's bolted directly to the custom outdrive flanges. Built in a simple custom made case. I'm sure you could do that with a Christman 10" with some modifications. Nothing to do with this post, but that car also has a Jerchico 5-speed manual transmission with straight cut gears. (NASCAR style, sort difficult to to learn to drive because the clutch is only used to start & stop, you need to learn to shift from gear to gear with the sound of the engine).
 

desertracer

Well-Known Member
Posts
2,074
Reaction
31
Is the Jerchico 5-speed transmission similar to the Fortin DGN with the same straight cut gears. Sounds very similar in the way that you only need to use the clutch to start and stop and you just blip the gas when you up shift. How is that transmission compared to the fortin strength wise?
 

martininsocal

Well-Known Member
Posts
22,828
Reaction
5
20 years ago Steve Mizel built an independent suspension Bronco using 9"s front and rear. Used stock style housings with flanges and seal mounts right outside the bearing carries for the Diff. I believe he was using 930 CV's with his set-up. As for using Spicer style axles. They were used extensively in the late 70's early 80's by high horsepower cars. I have a seat and a half from one of the MacMillans old porsche powered cars. They ran them with Stahl 3x3 rear arms running the Bus stubs and brakes. In the mid 80's bunderson ran some small spicer style axles that were pretty lighweight in the 1600 cars with good results. Theytried them in the higher horsepower cars, but they wouldn't hold up. They looked small, but the limited torque of a 1600 wouldn't kill them and I believe they were running close to 40 degrees.
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Posts
5,147
Reaction
107
That Bronco had to have a record number of successful race miles on it. What happened to it?
If oner355 wants to get 20 inches of travel he will have to watch the width of the center section. The most successful IRS cars were not A-arm but multilink or trailing arm. Trailing arm has the capability of being light and very strong at the same time. A Dana 44 in the rear of a full size truck used off-road would not live long. At any rate it will take some throrough homework to come out right.

Scalzo's Class 1 car (formerly the "Yellow Blur") is an interesting blend of a narrow quick change rear center section sitting right behind, and connected directly to, a rear mounted Turbo 400. The V8 engine is up front with a torque tube (like a newer Corvette) running back to the transmission. Final drive is through big plunging CV joints and out to some very long trailing arms. Similar to the familiar VW style suspension but BIG.
 

Ryan B

Well-Known Member
Posts
356
Reaction
10
I looked at the rears of a vette and a jag and they look pretty easy to mount. Does anyone know of any non-volkswagen type cv axles that are strong, reliable. and that can articulate enough to get some travel out of them.
thanks for the help.
 

martininsocal

Well-Known Member
Posts
22,828
Reaction
5
You want a Spicer style axle, it uses a slip shaft and u-joints. I have 3 complete axles taking up space in my garage, but they probably aren't wide enough for what you want. They were mounted on a 6' wider than stock VW rear with a bus trans. You could always get new intermediate shafts that are longer for them. These were run with a Porsche motor, so I am guessing they are at least good for 300+hp.
 

Harpo

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,019
Reaction
41
The difference is that the Jerchico is only a trans does not have outdrives, main shaft in - u-joint out
 
Top