Advice for first-timer at Vegas-to-Reno

rustyb

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Doing V2R (amateur quad) for the first time this year, looking for any advice from people who have done it. On someone else's team, so not so much machine prep, but anything at all that might be helpful; what to expect from the course, pitting tips, signup, whatever. Have done multiple 500s and 1000s so have plenty of experience getting out of the way of TTs. Thanks!
 

43mod

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hydrate , abstain from alcohol consumption for a week prior , hydrate some more.
 

Fourstroker

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Rider switch at every pit to stay fresh. Pay for pit service at Rawhide unless you can go that gap on fuel. You will never get there in time with a chase truck. Change air filters every 200 miles-ish. Keep your camelbaks full. Carry spare fuel for your chase trucks and get fuel whenever you have an opportunity. Cell phone service sucks
 

D Bergstrom

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Fourstroker pretty much summed it up. I will just add to pay careful attention to your pit strategy at the end. (The last three pits are always the same, and you can't leave any of them and beat the race vehicle to the next.) If you can't make it on fuel by missing one or two, you will need a crew at each one for fuel, or make a friend that can take fuel out there for you. The rest of the race is pretty easy to chase, most pits are pretty close to highway 95.

For sure make sure you have extra water. If you breakdown, you could be out there for a while. Last year I blew up the motor in my quad seven miles from the day one finish. I sat out there for 5 hours before BITD could get to me. Another thing I did before the race was throw an emergency blanket in my camelback. I was able to setup a makeshift shade area with it while I sat out there. There is no shade in some areas.

Doug
 

pgarfinkle

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The course is fast and smooth in most sections. There is some more tech stuff near the finish. Silt sections through out as well.

As mentioned, the pits for the first part of the race are pretty easy (can be done with one chase truck usually) and the ones towards the end get tricky. Pay for the Rawhide pit as 4stroker mentioned.

The heat can cause vapor lock so be prepared.

Sign up at this and any BITD is about as easy as I have ever seen. Getting through tech early and then getting out of the heat is key.

Don't underestimate the heat and how it will effect you. Its a bit different than that of Baja. Hydrate and eat during the race. Before the race make sure to hydrate the days/week leading up to the race and try to get some heat acclimation training in.
 

trentk

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Its much easier than baja from logistics to the physical output. On a quad its just about having a reliable machine that can handle being pinned in 5th for a very long time and keeping the silt out of the engine. Plan on multiple filter changes or lid changes. Getting lucky with flat tires also helps. Run tireblocks.

Physically its way easier, no need to change riders every pit IMO. It gets hard at the end due to all the rocks, you want a fresh rider if possible to take on the last 1-2 sections but thats also the hardest place to do a rider swap. As mentioned you will need fuel at rawhide but don't send a chase truck there, pay for help or find another team who can dump fuel for you.

I had some fuel pump problems on the raptor, never had any issues on any carb'd machine with the heat and vaporlock.

Good luck and have fun.
 

dezert_nerd

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Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!
 

El Mamito USMC

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good luck and let us know how it went
 

slim01

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Some of the feedback generated from the 2015 race I participated in as a solo bike was the bike/cager relationship and awareness during the race. I personally had good experiences with the cagers but I did hear there were problems between others. Given you have raced Baja Im sure you're more aware of this sort of thing than others. I raced the '14 B1K and it didnt seem to be as such a firey topic as V2R the following year.

The dust was more of an issue than I remember for the B1k and I think this lead to the cagers coming up behind some bikes and the rider just not being aware of someone on their tail. I found that if there was 1 cager coming up behind me, dont just pull back out in to the course after he's passed, there was usually another 1 or 2 right behind him.

Also a highlight for me was stopping in at the Loco's run pit. Im sure all the pits are well staffed but these guys were good fun.

Have a safe race bud.
 

D Bergstrom

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Is a GPS necessary to stay on course?
I have raced V2R five times over the years, have had a GPS. Never felt I needed one, course is well marked.

Doug
 

trentk

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It isn't necessary but if you can mount one easily it would not hurt. A few years ago a lot of the lead bikes and quads were taken off course due to a missing course marker that was blamed on a hungry cow. Many people went the wrong way and then had to double back into oncoming traffic. My team mate was on my raptor at the time and he crashed into someone in the chaos and it messed up the quad. 2 years before that quite a few people missed a turn in nearly the same section. Once at the SS300 a turn was not marked and it cost me about a minute.

So while it is rare it is nice to have .
 

rustyb

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Thanks again for all the good advice, guys. This is such a great forum! Experienced people are always willing to share their knowledge respectively without all the posturing, belittling, and aggressive crap that you find on so many forums (including some on this site). Feels like a real community here!
 

JDDurfey

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I have no experience with V2R. Never raced it, but if you ever race Baja, I can give you a couple of pointers. You will find most on this site are more than willing to help out those that are new or inexperienced. We were all there at one time, and some of us learned things the hard way and don't want to see others repeat our mistakes.

Good luck with the race. The only advice I have is hydrate hydrate hydrate! And something else that applies everywhere. When you get passed by a truck or buggy, do not jump back out on the course until you are 100% certain there is no one else coming. The cars drive off the GPS now days and you don't show up on that. Once you start getting passed, your speed will greatly slow down. In fact, if you are just riding for a finish, you could just pull over for a bit in a pit and rest while the TTs and Class 1s go through, then get back on it, but make sure you are looking behind you some.
 

rustyb

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Gotta call them tomorrow but in case anybody's listening-does BITD pull you out if you break? I know support vehicles aren't allowed on course during the race, but don't know how retrieval works. Thanks.
 

D Bergstrom

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Yes, BITD has numerous vehicles that are for retrevial. Once they find out where you are, (stuck stub, radio, etc.) they will send someone. Depending on where you are, it could be awhile. As I mentioned in my prior post, I was out there for 5 hours before they could get to me.

Doug
 

AZ7000'

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Sooooo, how did it go?..


Sent from my iPad using race-deZert
 

rustyb

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Went great, only problems with quad (Can-Am Renegade 800) were 2 flat tires and woefully insufficient lighting. All 4 of my sections were fast and not at all technical (except the rockpile after underpass, but 4WD made quick work of that). Only things that slowed me down were my own fear, dust, getting caught by trucks, and our weak lights-I rode 13-14 at about 30 mph because I could only see about 20 feet. Heat was not an issue for me. We finished after midnight and were fine with that; only other quad amateur broke.

Though we had a great time the fact that a bike racer died in a solo accident and a quad guy was hit by a trophy truck and injured puts a damper on things.

An observation, and this has nothing to do with the quad guy that was hit, I know absolutely nothing about that incident. I passed 6 or 7 bikes (I am assuming Ironmen) just before the trucks started catching us. Only one saw me coming before I was on him. If you are being passed by a 58 year-old on a farmer quad with a flat tire without seeing him, it's time for a rest or retirement. You need to be hyper alert to avoid getting killed by trucks going twice (or more) your speed.

Anyway, thanks again to everyone for the advice.
 
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