airbumps, yes or no debate

PBC_Tacoma_Kid

Well-Known Member
Ok I put Camburgs long travel suspension on my tacoma and they run it with airbumps most of the time but i didnt get them yet. My friend and i are debating wether or not they should be used. My point is that they would be useful for jumps and big bumps that would cause bottoming etc and he says that with only 13" in of travel they dont help but just make the ride bouncier and should only be used in conjunction with more travel or a a truck setup with bypass. would airbumps effect all around performance? I mean will it make the truck worse in any situation?
 

fishd00d

What A Joke
Well your friend is wrong...they help out so much its unbelivable. It makes a night and day difference when you have just a coilover and then add a airbump...I would do it for sure. It DOES NOT make the ride Bouncier...it makes it smoother.

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

firedog

Well-Known Member
Yes, Airbumps do make a world of difference. I couldn't believe it when we put them on our truck, much smoother and faster through the bumps. The shock/spring setup is the key, it takes a while to figure it out, we are still testing and trying new stuff all the time and searching for the ultimate setup.
 

singlehanded

Well-Known Member
It will make the suspension work better I never have hard bottom outs or ever hit my inner fender. But it will make your wallet smaller around 5 bills if you mount them yourself.

midnight landscaper working overtime and I'm full throttle I'm full throttle tonight
 

ACID_RAIN28

Well-Known Member
Air bumps are like a dream, if done right, all these kits out there run the bump of the lower arm, and efficiency goes out the door, not to mention the unnecessary stress on the lower arm. If your gonna do it, run it off the upper arm somewhere near the spindle mounting point, the whole system will cycle better too. for instance how many race truck out there have the bump running in on the frame that at ride height, the bump is in contact with the arm............None if any.

"THE FASTER YOU GO, THE SMOOTHER IT IS!"
 

Dylan

Well-Known Member
I agree that is often nice to run it of the upper….but have you looked at the Tacoma spindle!!! It is only designed to take lateral loads, putting air bump forces through the offset BJ tang on the spindle would be scary at best

“Those of you who think you know so much really annoy those of us who do!”
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
If you get them valved for your application they work a lot better then off the shelf.

Kris
"I was thinking the exact same thing about you..."
 

fishd00d

What A Joke
Yup I moved my airbump so it hits the upper...its nicer now so it dosent hit over every little bump but its there for the big hits!

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

ACID_RAIN28

Well-Known Member
well there has to be an acception or two, ie the tacoma spindle combo. but mathamaticly, it all pans out on the upper arm, the whole point is to stop the force acting on the spidle. running it on the bottom you are putting a pulling force on the junction where the spindle and lower are meet. and if you have one of those "all uniball kits, the force is now on that "little" snap ring. My personal belife is function over looks.

"THE FASTER YOU GO, THE SMOOTHER IT IS!"
 

elcaprerunner

Well-Known Member
If you are running a coilover and a bypass in the front you don't need an airbump because the last stage in a bypass works as the bumpstop. I have only seen it that way (coilover, bypass, and bumpstop) on hardcore race trucks and prerunners that you know will just beat anything in the desert. On a 4-link you always run them no matter what from what I've seen and what I'm told.

DIRT'S FOR RACING, PRERUNNERS ARE FOR GETTING THERE!
 

michael_loomis

Well-Known Member
on a buggy airbumps are useless....but on a truck they seem to help quite a bit, obviously weight is a factor . if you use a bypass shock there should be no need for an air bump. an airbump is a cheap(as in overall cost) "secondary" suspension.
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
No air bumps on the Herbst rigs!!

Kris
"I was thinking the exact same thing about you..."
 

ACID_RAIN28

Well-Known Member
runnig a bypass and an air bump on a street truck is pointless as well as a waist of money, that is the point of the last stage on the bypass, i have seen countless arm f-150's as well as others, that run a bypass and an air bump. but for those who have the money and think it is "cool" to jam as much junk on the front of their trucks, by all means go right ahead, it is only your money.

HERBST for life!

"THE FASTER YOU GO, THE SMOOTHER IT IS!"
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
Hey AcidRain are you any relation to FullPull? Just curious..saw your website.

Kris
"I was thinking the exact same thing about you..."
 

havahockey

Flipper
Thats why people shouldn't listen to their friends advice and should call reputable fab shops and post on message boards like here.

The Tacoma kit was designed to work with airbumps, I wouldn't leave them out on my truck. The $500 you spend now can save you money in the long run when you bottom out really hard without them.

Race-Dezert Anonymous - Step #1:
"Hello, my name is Jason. And I'm a Race-Dezertaholic."
 

YZFster

Well-Known Member
We have airbumps on our class12 car and it helps out big time....we would never race with out them...

Go Big or stay there.
 

Greg

Well-Known Member
Mike smith shocks also run a solid piston, nothing like a conventioal shock. As for the bumps and bypasses, I belive Ryerson shocks are about the only ones to fully combat bottoming and still run a valved piston.

Greg
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Like anything else, bump stops can be misused too. They should not be used to make up for an otherwise poor setup. When properly applied they can be a significant aid in absorbing bump energy. This is critical when approaching complete compression of long travel suspension in order to maintain vehicle stability. This is why the big red TT doesn't need them. It's priorities are more like a pavement vehicle which needs quick recovery back to ride height. This is done by reusing more of the bump energy (big rubber blocks) instead of dispersing it (convert to heat). Air/oil bump stops in any application allow some leeway in spring and shock absorption rates and of course, soften bottoming. A by-pass shock could also run a solid piston, if the tubes are in the right places and flow enough.

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

JrSyko

Jerry Maguire
Would bump stops work well on a near stock suspension? For example, on a 4x4 F-150/Chevy 1500 it appears that the "bumpstops" are just big pieces of steel with a rubber piece on the end of them. What if you replaced that with a bumpstop? Would that be pointless or would it help?

See ya in the dirt!
 
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