Angled trailing arm pivots

RDC247

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Hope everyone is staying safe out there...

Planning a rear suspension build and have pretty much decided to go with trailing arms instead of semi-trailing arms. However, I see some trailing arm setups with pivots that aren't parallel to the centerline of the car (see attached pic) and I like the idea of this because it does give me a bit of camber change. My track width will be on the narrow side at 80" so I'm thinking a design like this would also help with CV plunge.

However, I know these angled pivots will give me some toe change which isn't ideal but I'm thinking the toe change wouldn't be as dramatic as the VW semi-trailing arm setups.

Are angled trailing arm pivots a good compromise? Are there any downsides???

Thanks!
 

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isdtbower

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I looked at the straight vs traditional "angled rear pivot" and saw that the angled did help with camber and axle plunge. Longer arms helped with less toe change.

Not an expert as I went a different direction. But you can't deny that the traditional lets you go faster than you might want to.
 

bajaboy7

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FYI, stock Volkswagen is 13 degrees and aftermarket/longer arms are 10 degree. Just for your refernce.
 

RDC247

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So I'm moving forward with the angles pivots and was shooting for 8 degrees or so. But I've been studying how to position the pivots in relation to the CV flange of the transmission...having them all parallel with one another would insure that they're operating in the same plane which makes sense as you would think that it would prevent any binding but I've seen hints here or there that this can create evil, "corvair" style handling characteristics. Would this be the case? Any clarity would be much appreciated!

I'll be using bushings inboard and heims outboard so I'll be able to adjust toe.
 

RDC247

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I've worked on a lot of cars but I've been fortunate enough to never work on a Corvair.... So, in your opinion, is there any downside to having the trailing arm pivots and the inner CV installed and working in parallel?
 

partybarge_pilot

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Other than reduced plunge no. The toe and camber changes are pretty drastic and more of a drawback. It was an idea to fix one problem that created others. As with most suspension it's a game of compromise.
 
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