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Another race, another fire

hendersoned

Well-Known Member
On Saturday at the snore/more race at the river we had a truggie flareup at the finish line. looks like a broken dipstick tube Had been spraying oil all over the headers and when they stopped it flashed. we had cold fire extinguishers at the finish line put the fire out in a matter of seconds, didn't damage the car, they were back racing on Sunday. big thanks to Jack Bassett and cold fire extinguishers.
 

C.J. Hutchins

Well-Known Member
everyone needs to have these cold fire extinguishers in all their pit trucks.
 

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
Everyone needs to have a fire extinguisher in their pits. Calling for a name brand is a bit out there.
 

green787

Well-Known Member
Everyone needs to have a fire extinguisher in their pits. Calling for a name brand is a bit out there.
Ok, but as I understand it, I can just add this Cold Fire (oxymoron) crap to my two water extinguishers to use them for gasoline fires???...

U-haul 001.jpg
 

ndvalium

Rescue Director
Ok, but as I understand it, I can just add this Cold Fire (oxymoron) crap to my two water extinguishers to use them for gasoline fires???...

View attachment 176220
It is an additive that allows the extinguishers to be used for Class A and Class B fires. It is my understanding they don't sell the product but rather the extinguishers loaded and also offer recharge service.

I made a bunch of FireAde available for SDHQ to sell a couple years ago that offers the same capabilities and they sold a bit for a couple races and then it died off so I stopped supplying them but if anyone has 2.5 gallon extinguishers they want to recharge on their own, I sell a quart bottle with recharge instructions that will do one extinguisher for 20.00 - I am a FireAde dealer and that isn't making money - Just prefer the more the better approach to fire fighting in the pits..

Dave
 

bobsson

Well-Known Member
Ok, but as I understand it, I can just add this Cold Fire (oxymoron) crap to my two water extinguishers to use them for gasoline fires???...

View attachment 176220
Using a water extinguisher on an oil or electrical fire is pretty dangerous. You want a Dry Chem or C02 extinguisher for most car fires. Water will make an oil fire grow rapidly and possibly engulf the vehicle, and water on electrical fires is pretty self explanatory.
 

green787

Well-Known Member

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
After 32 years in the Fire Service, I can tell you, Class K is nothing more than a marketing slogan for class B fire in the 'K'itchen. They want to sell something rather than telling folks they can put the fire out by placing the pan lid in the pan or covering it with baking soda.
 

bobsson

Well-Known Member
After 32 years in the Fire Service, I can tell you, Class K is nothing more than a marketing slogan for class B fire in the 'K'itchen. They want to sell something rather than telling folks they can put the fire out by placing the pan lid in the pan or covering it with baking soda.
While I appreciate your service it doesn't change that it's actually being taught in fire schools. I had to learn about it joining my companies internal fire department even though we never use them where I work.
 

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
I retired in May of this year. I know where it came from. I know why. K is simply a burning flammable liquid. Where makes no difference. Even the magazines that used to be unbiased for the service now have pop-up ads and must click vids of products to read about what is really important in the fire service. Selling a product is one thing. Making people believe it is the only product that will work is something else entirely. Do we want education that makes society safer or do we need to sell a product?
 

vegasloki

Well-Known Member
After 32 years in the Fire Service, I can tell you, Class K is nothing more than a marketing slogan for class B fire in the 'K'itchen. They want to sell something rather than telling folks they can put the fire out by placing the pan lid in the pan or covering it with baking soda.
We had a grill go up in an EDR on the Strip a year or two back. I wasn't something a handheld, even a big one could handle or a lid and some baking soda could help. I suppose if your kitchen at home has 20-30 gals of oil and/or grease it would be the same thing. In fact it's fire code to use the overhead before you reach for the bottle.

The suppression system they use is quite different than what we use in the theater for our class B. We have large scale indoor pyro using powder suppressant whereas the kitchen areas have large scale overhead spray with a foaming agent. They call that class K and it's nothing like the A/B/C used in the theater (there are over 100 in the theater plus deluge and sprinklers). CCFD doesn't think class K is all about marketing. As long as those additive products don't put a false sense of security in someone or go against good layman firefighting techniques I don't see an issue. I doubt many racers in general, not just off road racers, know or have proper extinguisher training.
 

ndvalium

Rescue Director
We had a grill go up in an EDR on the Strip a year or two back. I wasn't something a handheld, even a big one could handle or a lid and some baking soda could help. I suppose if your kitchen at home has 20-30 gals of oil and/or grease it would be the same thing. In fact it's fire code to use the overhead before you reach for the bottle.

The suppression system they use is quite different than what we use in the theater for our class B. We have large scale indoor pyro using powder suppressant whereas the kitchen areas have large scale overhead spray with a foaming agent. They call that class K and it's nothing like the A/B/C used in the theater (there are over 100 in the theater plus deluge and sprinklers). CCFD doesn't think class K is all about marketing. As long as those additive products don't put a false sense of security in someone or go against good layman firefighting techniques I don't see an issue. I doubt many racers in general, not just off road racers, know or have proper extinguisher training.

I think what Bro Gil is saying is that Class K are another form of class B and the same foam works on both. Yes you would not want a dry Chem on the kitchen anyway as the clean up time would take forever - that stuff gets in areas you cant even imagine when it goes off. But a class B foam will typically extinguish a class K fire.

I have used Cold Fire before - I use FireAde now. I have put out Trophy Trucks fully involved to Nitro Methane dragsters. Alcohol and all levels of octane gas fires. The stuff works well when used properly. Training is important.

As far as training I am working on some ideas with a few other people. We may have something that is doable in the near future to help people learn via video that pertains to our industry. We can also offer some hands on use and training if people are interested. I have about 300 dry chemical extinguishers sitting in storage that have been donated for training purposes from local hotels here in Vegas and I get about 20 more each month.
 

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
Extinguisher training is important as most folks think you shoot at the fuel that's burning rather than the gas escaping that is actually what is on fire. Because of this, a lot of extinguishing agent is wasted by most regular folks and makes extinguisher use ineffective many times. Extinguisher training was actually much better when we had folks putting actual fires out in a pan full of flammable liquids. But environmental rules have pretty much eliminated that in today's world. Now it is video simulated, so there is no way to know if the student is actually applying the extinguishing agent at the right location. Getting close enough, proper aim, etc... are all important, and it is much better to have done it once under training conditions than to try to do it for the first time when it's hot, actually on fire, and there are plenty of folks doing chicken dances around you.

As far as sprinklers versus deluge systems, 2 different types of fires and 2 different types of automatic response. Can't be compared to what we are attempting to do in the desert at races. Those systems are engineered specifically for the occupancy and types of materials that will be burning. At a pit, crap shoot if the number and type of extinguishers are enough to put out what is burning. And that does not include the human factor trying to put the fire out. And extinguishers should be out, on teh ground, at the pit ready for use, not just when your car comes in, but also available for when the pit next to you decides you don't know what you're talking about when you tell them not to fuel out of that drum in the bed of their pick-up truck that is sitting on a plastic bed liner and not grounded. Fortunately they listened after their truck was on fire.
 

johndjmix

Well-Known Member
Water on a 12 volt electrical fire will work great, I have personal experience on this when a steel winch cable layed across the batt terminals in a trailer I had and caught some tie down straps a blaze. However water will destroy electronics obviously so be careful. One good thing about using water is it makes cleanup non existent.

you also need to keep in mind with electrical fires normally something else is caught on fire by the wires. Also, never ever use water on higher voltage fires due to the danger of electrocution!

Never ever ever use water on a oil/gas fire. As a former fireman I have seen many simple house cooking fires that would have been a non issue turn into a big fire because someone put water on it and spread the fire!

--John


Trophylite #6013
Dunarri LLC
WildPowerSports.com
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AZ7000'

Well-Known Member
Extinguisher training was actually much better when we had folks putting actual fires out in a pan full of flammable liquids. But environmental rules have pretty much eliminated that in today's world. Now it is video simulated, so there is no way to know if the student is actually applying the extinguishing agent at the right location.
Our hospital does live fire in a pan training annually... Last on Nov 18th, 2016
 
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