any serious plans to go to dakar in argentina?

randy s

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anybody gonna try to go? pretty spendy junkett.
 

Chase 2

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Isn't it about 100k to go watch?

Actually, with the "Dakar Rally" being in South America, you can do it on your own. You will have a hard time accessing the bivouac and you may only get to see the race vehicles once per day, but there were quite a few gringoes who went on their own last year. Some did it following the race on bikes using a combo of camping and staying in cheep hotels. It would require a bunch of homework and forethought, but it is very possible. I wish I had the time and cash, I'd be on it like white on rice.
 

Tipracer

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I gave this some serious thought and with the way things are now...it's a no go...
my plan was to fly to argentina and rent a suv type vehicle and follow along as best as I could(randy s was also thinking of going) but with tickets in the $1100 range which were really cheap and and extra 5K in spending money for car, gas, food and lodging plus the start of the race on new years, it got washed down the drain quickly, trip of a lifetime just not right now
 

randy s

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right now, it's prolly possible to buy a ride on one of the big service t-6 trucks that haul for some of the motorcycle teams. that's gonna be about a 15 to 20k deal not counting your transportation there and back or your hotels. but it does put you right in the rally. that includes your membership in the aso and entry fees and access to the bivouac areas. it's also about an 18 hr plane ride. for someone 6 ft 2 with bad knees like me, that is an absolute nightmare riding in coach. business and first class is really really expensive.
 

AZBadseed

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I work offshore in Brazil, so I am thinking about going over to see whatever portion of the race I can make!
 

nohandslance

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Question on the Dakar race.. Do they use the IRC Trackers, and what rules apply during this race? Speed limits or course deviation. Or do they just have more check points and no pre-running.
 

JPBart

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I know you can't go around the dunes if your car is overheating!!!!
 
M

memin.pinguine

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anybody gonna try to go? pretty spendy junkett.
Not real - visiting Cordoba, friend living there. If you think that a "regular" ticket from Seattle to La Paz is 500,- +/- it's not that expensive. Just for the travel. Tickets from Europe Amsterdam - Buenos Aires Lus(f)thansa 1500,- Euro's round trip, Mexico D.F. Buenos Aires with switch in Panama 1100,-US round trip. No clue on hotel prices....
 

Baja Fool

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anybody gonna try to go? pretty spendy junkett.
????? I think it's considerbly less expensive than Africa....flying to Paris then to Morocco and back only then to have to find wheels to get you around North Africa. After all that a wise man would surely find someone to guide him away from all those rebels running loose throughout that region.

I rate Dakar Africa 10 $$$$$$$$$$ plus a :mad: and Dakar South America 4 $$$$

I'll take Cordoba, Santiago, Buenos Aires any day.
 

DarrenSkilton

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If anyone is seriously interested in going send me a pm. There are various seats for rent in assistence cars. Entry fee is 8,500 Euros that you must pay in addition to the rental fee for the seat.
 

Baja Fool

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Honey, let's see that 401k statement again??:D

Dam! wish I could pull this off...my life would be complete......sorta.
 

randy s

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Honey, let's see that 401k statement again??:D

Dam! wish I could pull this off...my life would be complete......sorta.
lol. that's what i thought when i went to dakar in europe [portugal, spain]. i was wrong and i wanna go again.
 

randy s

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If anyone is seriously interested in going send me a pm. There are various seats for rent in assistence cars. Entry fee is 8,500 Euros that you must pay in addition to the rental fee for the seat.
8500 euros is what? about twelve grand or more. better have your passport and secondary id as well. depending on who you go with, it'll cost you 20-25k in all likelyhood. maybe more. but two things are certain. it's something only a few people will ever experience and it would be something you'll never forget.
 

JPBart

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How do you collect all those fees from the spectators? =P Seriously though, so you pay your 20-30k or whatever. What would you get that you couldn't get if you went with some friends and rented a car? If you were to rent a car and free lance following the race...how do you find the good spectator spots? Does TSO release spectator location info?

Just curious. Some day I really want to go to one of these but it's hard to imagine dropping 30k to do it.
 

Hog Wild

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What would you get that you couldn't get if you went with some friends and rented a car?
You get into the bivouacs, which I found to be by far the best part of following the race in South America. Walk right into just about any team's pit, look under the hood of the race cars and trucks, and talk with the competitors while they're off the clock. Without being in an official race or assistance vehicle with the right wrist band, you can't get into the bivouacs. That is, unless you have a really good friend in the event who has skills in obtaining a wrist band through other means. In that case, park your car someplace within 2 miles of the bivouac, if you can even get that close given the massive crowds of locals, and walk right in.

If you were to rent a car and free lance following the race...how do you find the good spectator spots? Does TSO release spectator location info?
ASO doesn't make this easy, at least not last year. And even if they did, it's not possible to watch much of the racing and still keep up with the moving bivouacs. Last year a couple of us rented bikes and constantly "raced" down the highway just to be able to arrive at that days finish in time to find a hotel and maybe see the competitors arrive near the entrance of the bivouac. On bikes we had great advantages over cars, as we were able to pass the numerous long backups of cars going between bivouacs, and we still had little spare time. As a pirate chaser, there's little time to hang out on the side of the course!

Most of the time the course is nowhere near the highways you travel between bivouacs. So, most of the time the only place to watch any racing is near the start or finish of the day as the competitors leave and arrive in the bivouac towns. And that's where the MILLIONS of spectators are also at, making for a crowded, hard to park, and viewing mess. Almost anyplace the race course can be accessed by spectators, it will look like the first mile at the start of the Baja 1000, or worse!

Even the competitors don't really know exactly where the course goes until they are racing it, as they are following the roadbook they just received the night before. ASO publishes the bivouac locations and a somewhat bogus map of the race course. As a pirate chaser, about the only way to find spectator locations is to ask the locals, or follow the lines of local's cars headed to such locations.

Don't go to Dakar to watch racing. That's better done by sitting at home watching it on TV. Either get a seat in an assistance vehicle (you won't be disappointed), or make very good friends with someone who can get you a bivouac wrist band and hope your luck comes through (unlikely, but possible).
 

randy s

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You get into the bivouacs, which I found to be by far the best part of following the race in South America. Walk right into just about any team's pit, look under the hood of the race cars and trucks, and talk with the competitors while they're off the clock. Without being in an official race or assistance vehicle with the right wrist band, you can't get into the bivouacs. That is, unless you have a really good friend in the event who has skills in obtaining a wrist band through other means. In that case, park your car someplace within 2 miles of the bivouac, if you can even get that close given the massive crowds of locals, and walk right in.

ASO doesn't make this easy, at least not last year. And even if they did, it's not possible to watch much of the racing and still keep up with the moving bivouacs. Last year a couple of us rented bikes and constantly "raced" down the highway just to be able to arrive at that days finish in time to find a hotel and maybe see the competitors arrive near the entrance of the bivouac. On bikes we had great advantages over cars, as we were able to pass the numerous long backups of cars going between bivouacs, and we still had little spare time. As a pirate chaser, there's little time to hang out on the side of the course!

Most of the time the course is nowhere near the highways you travel between bivouacs. So, most of the time the only place to watch any racing is near the start or finish of the day as the competitors leave and arrive in the bivouac towns. And that's where the MILLIONS of spectators are also at, making for a crowded, hard to park, and viewing mess. Almost anyplace the race course can be accessed by spectators, it will look like the first mile at the start of the Baja 1000, or worse!

Even the competitors don't really know exactly where the course goes until they are racing it, as they are following the roadbook they just received the night before. ASO publishes the bivouac locations and a somewhat bogus map of the race course. As a pirate chaser, about the only way to find spectator locations is to ask the locals, or follow the lines of local's cars headed to such locations.

Don't go to Dakar to watch racing. That's better done by sitting at home watching it on TV. Either get a seat in an assistance vehicle (you won't be disappointed), or make very good friends with someone who can get you a bivouac wrist band and hope your luck comes through (unlikely, but possible).
yep. even the pre-rally festivities are really controlled by the organizers. it's not ike the mil where you push your racecar thru contingency and the racers mingle with the crowd. they rope the cars and trucks off after they're scrutin.....teched and that's that til it starts. it's not nearly as fan friendly as it is at score races. it's fun anyway but the euros are pretty tight-assed. hey hogwild,,are you friends with any of those people who can get wristbands by chance? do they change out the color of the wristbands every day? i'm pretty sure you can get a wristband machine pretty easy at mcmaster-carr. just wondering.
 

Hog Wild

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hey hogwild,,are you friends with any of those people who can get wristbands by chance? do they change out the color of the wristbands every day? i'm pretty sure you can get a wristband machine pretty easy at mcmaster-carr. just wondering.
I'm friends with all of Jonah Street's team. But they couldn't get me the wristband until Jonah won a stage, and they told ASO some of his sponsors flew in to congratulate him. What have you done to help Jonah win? His cash strapped team is open to various types of help, as long as it's money, tires, or airline tickets!

The wristband I got was good for all bivouacs. I think there are some that are only good for one day.

Does that machine print Dakar logos and text on those wristbands? What exactly does that text and logo look like this year? Which wristband style and colors will they use this year? None of that will be known until about three days before the race starts. Good luck with that angle!

 

randy s

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I'm friends with all of Jonah Street's team. But they couldn't get me the wristband until Jonah won a stage, and they told ASO some of his sponsors flew in to congratulate him. What have you done to help Jonah win? His cash strapped team is open to various types of help, as long as it's money, tires, or airline tickets!

The wristband I got was good for all bivouacs. I think there are some that are only good for one day.

Does that machine print Dakar logos and text on those wristbands? What exactly does that text and logo look like this year? Which wristband style and colors will they use this year? None of that will be known until about three days before the race starts. Good luck with that angle!

yeah. i'm not gonna try and crash that party anyway. i was going to look into going down there but at a little over 6 ft. 2 with bad knees there's no way i'm sitting on an airplane for 18 hours or whatever it is riding in coach and first class is way to spendy. i appreciate the info mr. wild.
 
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