axle truss pregunta

Chris

Well-Known Member
Posts
535
Reaction
20
I am going weld up some kind of axle truss for my ford 8.8 something like the explorer 8.8 for sale add in the classifieds. I thought I remembered someone saying that you have to be careful welding to 8.8 axles because they warp somewhere, but I cant remember exactly what they said. Any info?
thanks.
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
Posts
618
Reaction
0
Welding on any axle housing will cause distortion. There are a couple of option if you really want to get it right. You can design and build a jig to maintain alignment but even with the best jig there will be some distortion. It can often be straightened after welding. A better option would be to do all of your welding, straighten the housing as best you can, then weld on new ends to the axle tubes. You can buy big bearing ends for that purpose or to convert a small bearing housing into a big bearing housing. You should still have a substantial jig to maintain alignment of the axle tube ends.

Axle tube ends can be purchased from chassis shops like Art Morrison <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.artmorrison.com/>http://www.artmorrison.com/</A> or through places like Summit Racing
 

Chris

Well-Known Member
Posts
535
Reaction
20
That is way more involved then just making a truss, wow. Ok next question how effective/ and or strong would a truss be that would bolt to the axle using ubolts or something. I would still be able to use the same design I had in mind with the exception being I would have to find some way to mount the truss to the axle without directly welding to the axle.
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
Posts
618
Reaction
0
Don't let a little bit of work scare you. Weld it up. Just realize that there is more to it or talk to a local shop about doing it for you.
 

BIG_FAT_LOSER

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,533
Reaction
3
I put a 1"x120 tube across the bottom of my 7.5 (from axle tube under housing to axle tube on other side) and ran 2 3/4 to 1" beads on the housing just to kind of keep it in place and have had no ploblems. But I think major welding will cause problems.

<font color=red>PAT KAPKO</font color=red>
<font color=yellow>Self appointed King of ghetto fab</font color=yellow>
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Posts
6,541
Reaction
1,366
Everything warps when welded depending on amount of weld and mass of material being welded on. The safest way to do this without a jig is tac every thing together first really well and do the same thing to the top as the bottom. this should even out the stress more or less...... Don't put anything on the back, makes service difficult......
 

Chris

Well-Known Member
Posts
535
Reaction
20
Brad, it's not so much the work that I am worried about, I love making stuff for my truck, the reason I hesitate is I don't want to turn my axle into a pretzel and have to buy a new one. I think I will make up a jig, that sounds like the best plan. I'm trying to think of a good design for a jig, any ideas???
 

TRDshaunTRD

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,061
Reaction
0
do the welding slowly. Tack it on first, then let it cool and start the major welding, then stop again to let it cool. Also weld top, then bottom, then top then bottom to even the heat out. This is what I heard works.

"Those who risk nothing are nothing."
 

Jimmy8

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,653
Reaction
1,292
Just as shaun said. Anytime we have trussed a rear end housing either for ourselves or anyone else, we have made some sort of a jig to hold it. Secondly, if you want it to be right, Weld it very slowly, a little at a time. Sometimes doing the truss work has taken us over a week. Better to take longer and know its right rather than to gamble. Another suggestion I have for you, although I don't know what kind of welder you are or if you have acess to one, but Tig welding it is definatly the best. We have never done one any other way.

Trophy Truck #15
www.jimmybeaver.com
 

DPpatrol

Well-Known Member
Posts
269
Reaction
1
I've heard currie offers a service where after you truss your axle, you send them the housing and they cut off the end plates of the housing, put the housing into a jig, and weld the ends back on so everything is square. That way even if the housing got a little warped during the trussing process, the axles still have a straight shot to the wheels. You might want to look into this.

jason
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
Posts
618
Reaction
0
Look into a large diameter solid or very heavy wall tube that goes through the entire housing. It should have machined pieces for each end to register in the bore for each axle bearing.

It is a common train of thought that welding in small sections will reduce the distortion and it may to some degree but any welding will cause thermal expansion and contraction in the metal. The contraction will be greater than the expansion and thus it will "shrink" on the side where the welding is done. To build your truss in such a way as to make the welding on top and bottom nearly equal would help but that doesn't account for a truss across the back. You will likely have to straighten the housing afterward and/or cut off the end of both axle tubes and weld new ones on using your jig. If Currie will do that it may be much cheaper to have it done than to build a jig for one housing. I believe Sandy Cone will do it too. Anyone who narrows housings should have a suitable jig too.
 

Crayfish

Well-Known Member
Posts
154
Reaction
0
Making a jig is key, something that holds the flanges straight and parallel with each other. 3/8 plates with holes to bolt flanges welded to an I-beam. Make the jig so the front face of the housing is is pointing straight down. Put a hydraulic jack on the inside of the housing between the I-beam and the housing and pre-load the the housing 3/8"-1/2" and then do all the welding in small sections. Wait until everything has completely cooled and remove the jack and it should pull back straight.

Good luck
 
Top