Baja 1000 race day thread

JDDurfey

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Seriously? Show me the drug running theory proof.

Don't pay any attention to Green...he likes to stir the pot.

I was the first one in this thread to bring up the cartels and drug running. That was what I was told years ago, and that was never substantiated by anyone in the know. But in general that is what everyone has always thought was the reason behind it. I agree with you that cartels could care less about laws and even if the law were for that reason it would not stop them from breaking it.

Thanks for your insight.
 

green787

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Don't pay any attention to Green...he likes to stir the pot.

I was the first one in this thread to bring up the cartels and drug running. That was what I was told years ago, and that was never substantiated by anyone in the know. But in general that is what everyone has always thought was the reason behind it. I agree with you that cartels could care less about laws and even if the law were for that reason it would not stop them from breaking it.

Thanks for your insight.

JD, I heard they found the biggest oil field ever in Texas, and you're still drilling??? LMAO!!!
It's obvious neither of you know anything about Mexico... but that's ok, you go on believing that everything in Mexico happens for a logical public safety reason, OK???:D:D:D
 

RedPhive

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Welcome to RDC. Thanks for the insight and information. And thank you for your service!

Not a big deal, I'd do this job for free!

Don't pay any attention to Green...he likes to stir the pot.

I was the first one in this thread to bring up the cartels and drug running. That was what I was told years ago, and that was never substantiated by anyone in the know. But in general that is what everyone has always thought was the reason behind it. I agree with you that cartels could care less about laws and even if the law were for that reason it would not stop them from breaking it.

Thanks for your insight.

I have quite a bit of background in the counter-narcotics business, specifically from the helo standpoint. I don't like to talk about it for obvious reasons, but I can assure you that the cartels have many, many methods to infiltrate our border. Prohibiting legitimate flights from night-time VFR operations is not going to stop them. Furthermore, there are many countries in the world that do not allow VFR flight at all, and many, like Mexico, that prohibit night-time VFR. I could spend my time today -- and your tax money -- finding the Mexican regulations and providing "proof" to Green, or I could go do my job and protect 'Merica. Since I take the oath seriously, I'll go with the latter option.

This isn't about me or why or why not Mexico has set certain aviation regulations in place. It is what it is. Good people got hurt this weekend. It's serious issue that deserves its own thread, but I suspect it's also one that we're unlikely to solve here.
 

green787

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Not a big deal, I'd do this job for free!



I have quite a bit of background in the counter-narcotics business, specifically from the helo standpoint. I don't like to talk about it for obvious reasons, but I can assure you that the cartels have many, many methods to infiltrate our border. Prohibiting legitimate flights from night-time VFR operations is not going to stop them. Furthermore, there are many countries in the world that do not allow VFR flight at all, and many, like Mexico, that prohibit night-time VFR. I could spend my time today -- and your tax money -- finding the Mexican regulations and providing "proof" to Green, or I could go do my job and protect 'Merica. Since I take the oath seriously, I'll go with the latter option.

This isn't about me or why or why not Mexico has set certain aviation regulations in place. It is what it is. Good people got hurt this weekend. It's serious issue that deserves its own thread, but I suspect it's also one that we're unlikely to solve here.

Oh, come on now, Your Mexican pilot buddy could text you a pic of the regs, and you could do a screen save and post it here while you're flying if you were even half as cool as the UTV guys.... :cool::cool::D:D:D
JD, you should invite this newbie to Purple, I think he could be a good contributor.... He needs "super vetting"...
 
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sb4pro

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pissin contest ?????????????
Rotflmao
IMG_4532.JPG
 

Wendell #527

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Baja is not for everyone, and those that do love it like myself accept the risks. We race knowing medical help is remote and limited. Unfortunatly accidents do happen and I wish all involved my thoughts and prayers. Helicopters have never flown at night in Mexico.

Scott gets it. We need to stop with all the demands to make racing safe in Mexico. We already have "safe" racing in the US with other organizations and well, racing Baja is just better. Yes, it's dangerous. It always has been and people used to accept that. Drivers will get hurt. Spectators will get hurt again. Will we see bans on spectating close to the track then? There will be booby traps, do we have to send cops to every area of the track to stop that from happening? What about driving through the little pueblos--all fun racing but next time somebody gets hurt in one are we going to stop that, too? Racing through Ensenada streets at full speed is FUN but next time somebody gets hurt there are we going to move the race start to outside the city like we do here now? Remember it's Mexico. It's their country, we just get to race in it and should be thankful how cool the local people there are (for the most part). I am a big Parkhouse fan. I used to get my tires shaved and they always took care of me when I went down there. Great people and I feel bad for the accident, but we don't need to panic and ruin what is special about racing in Baja.
 

offroadracer516

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Baja racing needs to remain baja racing. If you want to race with massive regulations and low speed limits anywhere near people. Stay in the states. Scott hit it dead on. Baja racing is not for everyone. I personally love it.
 

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BrentB

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Riviera #3 race report.

First off, our thoughts and prayers are with Cody and Mark, such an unfortunate incident, we all know the highways are the most dangerous part of racing in Baja.

Kyle and I starting first off the line in the "Black Diamond" of the Baja 1000 was a very special experience. We know how much love there is for the Team and the Truck in Baja by the locals. A 24 year old race car with a history and reputation that goes without saying, but the fact is there is a ton of new technology and new trucks that this truck shouldn't be able to be as competitive as it was. Kyle LeDuc has such raw talent he blew my mind so many times, obviously by putting us on the pole, but by doing it in the exact setup we race the B1k with. Fuel, spares, tools, everything, (except my 165lbs). I have raced with so many talented drivers over the years, but I was blown away how INCH perfect Kyle was on his first and only time prerunning, due to many circumstances Kyle wasn't able to come down until Monday afternoon. Leaving us only two days to prerun his 475 miles together, fortunately Mark let us use his Prerunner, sister to the Diamond, Kyle got to see the course in as similar seat as there could be to the race car. I had spent three weeks prerunning/making my notes, then doing final runs with Mark and Ed the weekend before.

We were confident in our race plan, try to hold first on the road going into the night then we could control the race. First on the road has such an advantage but also holds so many risks, traffic, booby traps, etc. We left the line with a clear plan who we were really racing behind us and not take risk where unnecessary. But we also knew one mistake/flat/missed turn would would take the magical clean air away from us. Leaving Ensenada we were excited to see little wind so could take it easy to the Pepsi stand, get a split and grind our way down to Urapan. We had put 20 seconds on Ricky but Robby had gained 15, the dust was clearing in many areas faster than I'd hoped. We knew they wouldn't get by us going to Uranpan if we didn't make a mistake, but also knew we needed so time so we could conserve tires heading to the coast where Ricky would have an an advantage. Plan executed, but Ricky shrunk the gap at the winery/B500 qually course. Dust wasn't hanging and the 4x went corner to corner quick. Leaving Santo Thomas we had 45 on Ricky and 2:45 on Robby. Let the fun begin, I knew Ricky would have to pit short of us at around 150 so we planned to push hard to build a pitting gap at that point, Robby's multi splash pitting was also in our mind but our gap on him was safe.

Then it happened, every race in Baja you have issues to deal with that will dictate your race, ours just showed up. Leaving Erindia we lost the front brakes, this really handicapped Kyle's ability to make the Diamond dance in the techy stuff and sketchy on anything downhill. Adapting driving style some we still pushed hard to build the gap for our stop, and we did. Herbst Pit one, in for tires and fuel and try to diagnose brake issue, but not give up first on the road. Failed, while looking for the issue Ricky just goes by. Now it got really exciting trying to retake control of the race without front brakes and in Rick's dust we are pushing hard on the cliffs of Vicente Guerrero, with all he just added VCPs I was very busy keeping Kyle from cutting to pass at places we couldn't. Eye opener, over the rise where Alan Ampudia would eventually crash we have a BIG moment, big big moment. In Ricky's dust, we misjudged top of the rise and lack of front brakes we fly off the rise at i believe a much faster speed than Alan. "Oh" I've been in this situation so many times in my navigating career; silence, time slowes, and you process in milliseconds. Fortunately Kyle still committed to the Rt 20 0ver call, he turns we go airborn, slam embankment left front tire just as he straightens the wheel. Big hit, big big hit and big time moment coming, we pitch to my side at least 45 degrees, embankment right coming Kyle steers Lt 10, we impact, big explosion of rock and dust blows through the cab, now airborne pitching towards Kyle's side, he wraps the throttle two times while steering near full lock right. Dust clears from cab as we touch down, Kyle mats the gas the throws it into the Rt 30 @ bottom. "Good truck" he calmly says over the intercom , steering now has a hard spot to steer through but she is still alive.(as are we) We press on to the beach at the VG wash still in Ricky's dust, jump onto the wet sand clean air then exit beach through the sand mounds. Dust again as we weave along the inland side of the sand mounds, I call Exit Rt 20 @ Y and the dust clears. "Ricky went left, we went the wrong way" Kyle says over the intercom, "no he is missing the VCP I'm steering us to", there it flashes on Stella. Now Ricky has around a half mile lead on us, Kyle is on full burn and the Diamond just loves the area just north of San Q. We want to get back to the front but now I know we are really nine minutes in front of Ricky because of the missed vcp. We run to San Quintien get into the speed zone and talk about our situation with the truck, strategy coming and when or if we should stop to deal with our issues.

I'll finish recap later.
 

AZ7000'

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#Don'tUSABAJA
 

Dlock5

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Riviera #3 race report.

First off, our thoughts and prayers are with Cody and Mark, such an unfortunate incident, we all know the highways are the most dangerous part of racing in Baja.

Kyle and I starting first off the line in the "Black Diamond" of the Baja 1000 was a very special experience. We know how much love there is for the Team and the Truck in Baja by the locals. A 24 year old race car with a history and reputation that goes without saying, but the fact is there is a ton of new technology and new trucks that this truck shouldn't be able to be as competitive as it was. Kyle LeDuc has such raw talent he blew my mind so many times, obviously by putting us on the pole, but by doing it in the exact setup we race the B1k with. Fuel, spares, tools, everything, (except my 165lbs). I have raced with so many talented drivers over the years, but I was blown away how INCH perfect Kyle was on his first and only time prerunning, due to many circumstances Kyle wasn't able to come down until Monday afternoon. Leaving us only two days to prerun his 475 miles together, fortunately Mark let us use his Prerunner, sister to the Diamond, Kyle got to see the course in as similar seat as there could be to the race car. I had spent three weeks prerunning/making my notes, then doing final runs with Mark and Ed the weekend before.

We were confident in our race plan, try to hold first on the road going into the night then we could control the race. First on the road has such an advantage but also holds so many risks, traffic, booby traps, etc. We left the line with a clear plan who we were really racing behind us and not take risk where unnecessary. But we also knew one mistake/flat/missed turn would would take the magical clean air away from us. Leaving Ensenada we were excited to see little wind so could take it easy to the Pepsi stand, get a split and grind our way down to Urapan. We had put 20 seconds on Ricky but Robby had gained 15, the dust was clearing in many areas faster than I'd hoped. We knew they wouldn't get by us going to Uranpan if we didn't make a mistake, but also knew we needed so time so we could conserve tires heading to the coast where Ricky would have an an advantage. Plan executed, but Ricky shrunk the gap at the winery/B500 qually course. Dust wasn't hanging and the 4x went corner to corner quick. Leaving Santo Thomas we had 45 on Ricky and 2:45 on Robby. Let the fun begin, I knew Ricky would have to pit short of us at around 150 so we planned to push hard to build a pitting gap at that point, Robby's multi splash pitting was also in our mind but our gap on him was safe.

Then it happened, every race in Baja you have issues to deal with that will dictate your race, ours just showed up. Leaving Erindia we lost the front brakes, this really handicapped Kyle's ability to make the Diamond dance in the techy stuff and sketchy on anything downhill. Adapting driving style some we still pushed hard to build the gap for our stop, and we did. Herbst Pit one, in for tires and fuel and try to diagnose brake issue, but not give up first on the road. Failed, while looking for the issue Ricky just goes by. Now it got really exciting trying to retake control of the race without front brakes and in Rick's dust we are pushing hard on the cliffs of Vicente Guerrero, with all he just added VCPs I was very busy keeping Kyle from cutting to pass at places we couldn't. Eye opener, over the rise where Alan Ampudia would eventually crash we have a BIG moment, big big moment. In Ricky's dust, we misjudged top of the rise and lack of front brakes we fly off the rise at i believe a much faster speed than Alan. "Oh" I've been in this situation so many times in my navigating career; silence, time slowes, and you process in milliseconds. Fortunately Kyle still committed to the Rt 20 0ver call, he turns we go airborn, slam embankment left front tire just as he straightens the wheel. Big hit, big big hit and big time moment coming, we pitch to my side at least 45 degrees, embankment right coming Kyle steers Lt 10, we impact, big explosion of rock and dust blows through the cab, now airborne pitching towards Kyle's side, he wraps the throttle two times while steering near full lock right. Dust clears from cab as we touch down, Kyle mats the gas the throws it into the Rt 30 @ bottom. "Good truck" he calmly says over the intercom , steering now has a hard spot to steer through but she is still alive.(as are we) We press on to the beach at the VG wash still in Ricky's dust, jump onto the wet sand clean air then exit beach through the sand mounds. Dust again as we weave along the inland side of the sand mounds, I call Exit Rt 20 @ Y and the dust clears. "Ricky went left, we went the wrong way" Kyle says over the intercom, "no he is missing the VCP I'm steering us to", there it flashes on Stella. Now Ricky has around a half mile lead on us, Kyle is on full burn and the Diamond just loves the area just north of San Q. We want to get back to the front but now I know we are really nine minutes in front of Ricky because of the missed vcp. We run to San Quintien get into the speed zone and talk about our situation with the truck, strategy coming and when or if we should stop to deal with our issues.

I'll finish recap later.
Dam with his driving and your writing this seems like a freaking movie. I can't wait to hear the rest.

Sent from my C6725 using Tapatalk
 

Total Loss

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Matlock is a bad dude.

6a6b716fdf97368acaafdc584b4f8425.jpg





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When I heard Matlock was going "UTV", I knew that was bad news for everyone else.
Anyone that could pilot a quad like he did has little trouble with anything else.
(spoken by an X-3 wheel racer)
 

B-G-H

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Just attended my 2nd Baja 1k race and want to sincerely thank all of you racers. You are all super nice to those of us who go there to watch and cheer. Was great to chit chat with some of you, thanks again!
 

High4

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Figured as much. It would just be interesting to know if there were mechanical/reliability issues or just carnage.

They had a broken shock mount on the rear axle. They stopped into our pit in Camalu and we tried (and failed) to weld it back on (generator wouldn't provide enough amperage for sufficient penetration). They commented that they had an entire spare rear axle waiting a few miles down the course with their crew. I assume that was their long delay on the Pacific side of the course.
 

JoeyD23

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Johnny Angal Score International Baja 1000 Race Report
#2921 UTV Inc Polaris RZR XP Turbo – Pro UTV Forced Induction

Silt Happens
Well as I sit in my office on this overcast gloomy Sunday thinking about the race teams in Baja today going to the awards ceremony I kind of throw my hands up on the air. Being so disappointed yet again, I know I shouldn’t be but damn it’s hard not to be. We spent months getting ready for this race, we had friends and co-drivers fly in from all over the United States to help us. In all reality I know how hard it is to even show up for a race like this. With around 300 race teams once a year making the annual pilgrimage to Baja from all over the world. There is nothing easy about it the brutality of driving an off road vehicle 850 miles thru the most unforgiving terrain in the world. I say that not because you can’t find harder or steeper or softer terrain in other places, but because the roads and desert trails we are racing on have been chewed up by people prerunning for the last three weeks. Now 300 plus off road vehicles are racing in front of us literally chewing and grinding the dirt into the finest powder you can imagine. The dust floats in the air for hours, at times we can’t see two feet in front of us. The trophy trucks in front of us that are running 40” tires are pulling out rocks from the earth that have laid in the same spots for a million years. They are spitting them out on the trails that are narrower then our race cars. We are racing down next to a beautiful beach during the day with outside temps around 72 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s so badass and perfect! But, 10 feet away on the right are 150ft cliffs that with the tiniest mistake will send you plummeting to your death on a rocky beach! I am not sure why I do it or why my co-driver Boner would even sit in a car with me at time like that. While racing we experience sheer terror at times followed by brief moments of ecstasy and calm all while doing 90mph down a somewhat smooth flat straight road. With a cool breeze whisking the sweat and dust off our body’s, we finally get to take a deep breath, relax our grips on the steering wheel or whatever your co-driver might have been holding onto and prepare for the next 800 miles. A lot of this happens all before we even get out of town.

I would like to thank everybody that made this trip possible: Polaris RZR, ITP Tires, Method Race Wheels, Fox Shocks, Rigid Industries LED Lighting, my awesome crew at UTV INC, Airdam Clutches, SMG Racing, Craig, Keith, Jesse, Al, Victor, Victor, Uncle Johnny, Rodger, Boner, Craig, Vance, My Brother Al, Hostyle Products, Wolf Designs, Mad Media, Joey, Josh, Rusty, Shock Therapy, Satmoto and everybody I am forgetting!!!! It takes so many people to come together to make a race like this possible.

So we went down to Baja 5 days before the race so we could prerun the course. Also I was to be racing the first 292 Miles, Victor doing the mid race section and Craig finishing the race. Prerunning went well for all of us and on Thursday we had tech inspection and contingency. First thing in the morning Boner and Adam (Airdam) had to go out and work on our clutching a little to get the car dialed in. Around noon we headed to line up in tech. When we got there the line wasn’t moving and was miles long so we waited for a couple more hours and got in line around 2pm. We sat in line so long, while I understand it’s something we have to do, to do this the day before a race, sitting in a line for 10 hours, with your legs aching and the sun burning your face and arms, I repeat 10 lovely hours, is just plain silly and to the point of just plain stupid! We have a drivers meeting at 7PM, lol, but we are sitting in line until Midnight the day of the race with our race car! We get back to the hotel and I get about 4 hours of sleep. It’s 7AM and we meet for race day breakfast and head out to finish the final details and go over chase plans. Around 10AM I head to the hotel to put on my fire suit and ready myself for what should be 8 hours of having the ever living poop beat out of me! We head to the starting line around 10:30AM and get to sit and wait some more as we don’t start the race till around 12:30PM. LOL! Not sure again why, if we are not starting for 2 more hours, why we need to be there so early! Seems as if 30 mins prior should be enough time to get us lined up but what do I know, LOL! I just sit in the sun and burn for a couple more hours before I put my helmet on my sunburned face for the next 8 hours. Alright, we start lining up and heading to the starting line which takes no more than, yah you guessed it, 30 freaking minutes and we are 7th in line.

Pulling over the box, I watch the other racers take off in front of me. The anticipation is building and I just stare at the green the flags. I pull up and take it all in. There are thousands of people lining the street at the starting line, I continue to stare at the green flags waiting for them to release us off the line. The green flags go up and we are off!

Our Polaris RZR Turbo 4 is running strong as we leave town and we quickly hit 90mph as I pull up behind three other cars in our class. They are going a bit slower so we pass a couple and pass a couple more that have already succumbed to some kind of issues. As we are leaving town around the 10 mile marker we have our own issues. The car starts running really bad and we lose power. I quickly tell Boner its feels like a spark or fuel problem. He jumps out and starts checking everything out. All the while 100’s of locals surround our race car for pictures and to see if they can help. It turns out our drive belt delaminated a 6” section. Boner put a new belt on and we were good to go except now every one of the UTVs in the race had passed us! I tell Boner ‘No big deal, it’s a long race and we can make it up’. As we take off I tell Boner to call our chase team at race mile 20 to get another spare belt for us just in case. As we pull up to them, we grab it and take back off. We are now in a speed zone on the highway and the speed is limited to 37mph for about the next 10 miles. If you go 1 mph over 37 you get an instant speed penalty. As we come off the highway we quickly start passing other cars. A couple of miles in we pull behind about 10 UTVs that are being held up by a diesel truck that is going so slow and will not pull off the course. So nobody can pass and it is really absurd that this guy is in front of the UTV class. Anyway, good for me, he slowed so many people down that we caught them and started making quick work of getting around them. At the end of the first 80 miles we are back in the race and headed to the coast.

Everything is working great as we approach race mile 117. It is the section right next to the ocean and covered with HUGE river rocks. I see the Polaris RZR helicopter and not wanting to look slow I speed up a bit and fly into the river rock. I smash into a boulder and give us two flat tires. Boner gets out to assess the situation. Joey D (UTV Underground) comes running over and helps Boner get the rear tires changed and sees that we just bent our Method Race Wheel on the lip, letting the tire bead leak air. So they pull the front tire off the car and a local guy runs and gets a sledge hammer. He bends the wheel back in place and Joey runs over to his truck with the tire and fills it with air. Him and Boner come back and put it back on the car. Joey tosses us a tire plug kit as we will now be racing with no spare tire until the next pit stop at race mile 170. We are off and racing again. Around race mile 122ish we pass a RZR that is stuck in a huge hole and they are standing next to the race car with the tow strap out. I think “f*** that” as I drive past. Then I thought ‘Hey that was Justin from Shock Therapy!’ I slam on the brakes and back up to them. They hook the tow strap up to my car and I try yanking them out 3 or 4 times to no avail. As race traffic is pulling up on us they unhook their strap and tell us, “Go go go!!” We take back off into the night with no spare tire. Now we have a huge problem, my car is now attracted to rocks, LOL.

Now I am normally very good at tire placement and not hitting rocks and stuff but now I cannot avoid them. Literally if my life depended on it I couldn’t avoid them. My front tire slams into the first rock and Boner is like “WTF?! You got to be careful, we don’t have a spare!” I am thinking to myself, I know that and that wasn’t my fault that rock must have just rolled in front of the tire! We are now around race mile 135 and guess what, yup, another rock jumped right in front of me. We hit it hard! We make it to a huge pit area at race mile 140 and we pull over. There is no way we are going to make it to our pit at race mile 170. We call our chase crew and tell them they need to come to us so we start going over the car making sure everything else is good. While we wait for them we watch everybody pass us again. We wait for about an hour for our crew to get to us. When they show up we load up with tires, fuel and head off into the darkness! It’s cold but the car is running great and we quickly catch a couple of cars and pass them. We don’t get much further as we come up a small rise right at the top is a silt hole on the driver’s side of the car. We are plugging along doing probably 30 mph and the front drives side tire slams into it stopping us dead in our tracks. I push the gas pedal and slowly pull off of the race course. Boner says “Flat tire?” I say “No… it isn’t flat, I can see it. It is right next to me outside the car about 2 feet from where it is supposed to be.” We get out of the car and see that it’s not good. We need our chase truck again.

Between them getting to us and Boner fixing the car it will be hours of lost time. We decided to call the race on the spot. There was no way we are going to podium this race and that’s what we showed up for. It’s really sad when I call a race especially when you have other drivers that never even got to drive. It’s a really insightful feeling but I made the call and I’m sure I will go over it a million more times to see if it was the right call! Thank you all so much for supporting us and living the #RZRLife with us!
 

JPBart

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The US Government doesn't have life flight helicopters in place for it's citizens and visitors. Private companies in the US do, for a price.

Sorry but there are lots of municipalities in the US with medical response helicopters. CHP, LA and SBDO counties all do in socal.
 

Bro_Gill

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CHP does not have medical helicopters. They have enforcement copters that they carry a medic on, for their needs. They will respond to medical emergencies if requested and no other resources are available. LA City has fire rescue choppers, but they are listed as response for LA City. As a general rule. other than burn victims, they generally transport to their nearest waiting RA on the ground that then transports to the hospital. SBDO is NOT a medic transport helicopter. it is a Sheriff copter that does LE work. No medic that I am aware of and will hook up a bucket to fire work when there is a need. It is painted almost exactly like the CalFire Copters that will perform rescue and hoist work, but also do not staff with a paramedic and if they are going to do any medical transport, will take a medic from the fire department when the need arises. I have used 2 of the above 3 for actual rescue work, none of them transported to a hospital. Some agencies have some standing orders that if their own people need transport, they will do it if it is the fastest means, like most of the fire choppers, but that does not stand for the public.

And RedPhive- the remarks about designated LZs are fort reality in Mexico. There are many things I think you aren't considering with regard to any night ops (ain't happening!) in Mexico. You aren't going to single skid anywhere on the Mikes Loop, etc... Having designated GPS'd sites that are safe and clear for landing day or night would be a necessity. We aren't talking about stopping traffic flow on the freeway for a safe dust free landing spot. Dangers will include a still hot race track, no real idea where the site is, no real first responders that have ever landed a helicopter(possibly) in the field, and definitely no crash rescue at the site as is required and desired by most air medivac services in the states.
 

JPBart

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Covina, CA
I don't know Bro I'm not a pro like you but I have loaded injured people into a SBDO Huey that could take 3 patients with a medic and I think BLS gear. Same with CHP who left the spotter with us for an hour while they flew the patient out. Usually it's Mercy air but they aren't always available.

I think you are getting too far into the details about a 'medical' helicopter and the idea that municipalities don't have them. I agree there is a difference between BLS and ALS capabilities between Mercy and others but it's not true to say there aren't medical birds run by these municipalities. Regardless of whether they primarily do other things or not they are still able to, and do, respond to medical transports.
 
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