Beadlock trivia question

Bob_Sheaves

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Hello all,

Trivia question:

On what vehicle, and in what year were beadlock wheels first used for either military ot commercial use?

Bonus points:

What was the purpose stated for their use and what was the real reason?

(Hint: it was BEFORE 1969 and NOT in the US!)

Best regards,

Bob Sheaves
 

Mike_HKmtrsprts

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My guess would be for commercial use to keep truck tires or trailer tires on the rims due to overloading the trucks????
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by Mike_HKmtrsprts on 02/22/02 08:34 AM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

Waldo

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It was the Amish (sp). They use beadlocks on their wagons. The weight of all their children (and wives?) put so much stress on the wheels.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

tkr

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how about aircraft landing gear??

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

Chris

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It's got to be military use, don't they get all the good stuff first? I like the airplane idea, is that it?
 

Prater

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Weren't the first used on front end loaders in europe for open-pit mining?

-Prater

-Prater
 

scott

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Isn't it Tanks??? I know all the wheels on tanks roll on the tread or the tracks, but the very first wheel and the last wheel has some type of beadlock thing on it to keep the tracks on the rest of the wheels. I figure its either that or the Chinese had them on their Rikshaw's, or the Romans with their Chariots????
 

Bob_Sheaves

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Ok guys, I won't keep you in suspense any longer....

<image src=http://www.4wdonline.com/Mil/RU/PiCs37/MAZ8x8a1.jpg>

Above is a 1962 Russian Scud missle launcher (known as the MAZ 543)- the first vehicle (military) to use beadlock wheels and Central Tire Inflation Systems for increased off road mobility. This truck grossed out at over 300,000 lbs and was capable of traveling (fully loaded) up a 60 percent slope and "sidehilling" at a 45 percent slope. To give a sense of scale, the highest point on the vehicle (the missile) is almost 16 feet off the ground. The interesting thing is that this vehicle was not developed by the Russians (at least initially) but by the Czechs from Tatra, using the T813....

<img src=http://www.UnimogsWest.com/tatra8138x8.jpg>

...from 1965(!) commercial introduction. The T813 was advertised in the west as a road mobile oil exploration rig of 100,000kg GVWR. The apparent discrepancy in delivery dates is due to the former Soviets hold over their "client states". In this next view (BIG picture-1.1MB) you will be able to more clearly see the beadlocks and the CTIS covers on the wheels of this 1966 model T813 (also note the rear swing axles- this truck has independent suspension on all 4 axle locations).......

<img src=http://playground.sun.com/~brutus/tatra/pics/Dscf0129.jpg>

Best regards,

Bob Sheaves
 

Donahoe

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Ok Bob this conferms my theory that you have WAY WAY too much stuff rolling around in your head... Get some sleep Bob and play some video games That should help.

NEVER LIFT!!!!!
 
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