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begining fab

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Get a bigger extension cord. Not neccessarily longer, just bigger wire. Wire resistance is a function of length, and the resistance is driving the current demand up to get the same wattage to the weld.

"Teach you all I know and you're still stupid"
-- Howdy Lee
 

Stan

Well-Known Member
It is a big one. Not quite as big as the welder plug in. Plus I have it plugged into a 6 outlet surge protector with the stereo and rechargable tools. This is the first time I've had problems with the surge protector kicking off, but I had the power turned up somewhat since I was welding an 1/16" brace onto the frame at the shock mount. This is the only time I plug the welder into the the cord, all other times it gets plugged into the outlet itself. Next time, hopefully there won't be a next time, I'll just plug the cord straight into the outlet and not the surge protector.

"Rehabilitation begins at autopsy."
 

Flea

Well-Known Member
Stan what is this anti splatter stuff that you dip the end of your gun in? and will just a local welding supply place have it? What brand do you use?

thanx

GOD BLESS AMERICA! and hopefully my poor truck too.
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
It's similar to a grease, but not really. Keeps the dingleberries from sticking to the wire guide and nozzle. It is also offered in an aerosol spray which has the advantage that you can spray it on an area you don't want the dingles marking or sticking to. Just don't think yer gonna paint over it w/o a THOROUGH cleaning.

"Teach you all I know and you're still stupid"
-- Howdy Lee
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
A 120 volt MIG can do some light to medium work but a TIG must be 240 volt. The current requirement of a Tig over Mig is 30 to 40% for the same job. Unless you pre-heat the heck out of it with a torch, you won't be able to TIG on aluminum. If you are near any large city or industrial area you can pick up nice old TIG units for under $1,000 pretty much ready to use at auctions, etc . They also show up on ebay from time to time along with torches and other accessories (buy only as far as you want to drive). If you know what you are looking at, some are NEARLY as good as new units. Look for one with AC, DC straight and reverse output, and high frequency as a minimum. If possible, try to find one with square wave capabilities. These have been around for a while and are common on the used market. I have used various welding units for many years and the only big drawback to the old units is that they are very big and heavy. Most are smooth as glass and are at least if not more reliable than newer units. If money is tight, you can run water from the house through the torch and water the plants with it (no cooling unit). If 240 volt power is not available, you will be very limited as to what you can accomplish.

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

Stan

Well-Known Member
I got my stuff from Home Base, but Home Depot and Orchard has it. I'm sure any good hardware store right down the street will have it, not to mention the welding supply shop. Don't know what brand, just whatever they had on the shelf.

"Rehabilitation begins at autopsy."
 

vwguy

Well-Known Member
a 120 volt 135 amp mig can mostly handle up to 3/16 and 1/4 iis somewhat pushing it
try harborfreight.com
northerntools.com

they have hobarts and they are good welders but i tried out a miller at the off road expo and i now want to get a miller really bad

how ironic is it that most people slow down for speed bumps yet almost all of us here im sure pin it
 
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