• Forum membership has its advantages....

Best Class for Novice?

#1
Just joined and am looking for some guidance on which class to pursue as a complete novice.

Did some basic internet research and the general consensus is that class 11 is for the novice but also looked at the Stock Full class and it appears that could be a possibility as well.

Any lessons learned will be greatly appreciated.

- Globalhub
 

wheezy

"PRO PHOTO"
#7
A lot of guys start in 5. You won't come out and win any big races, but you'll learn and have fun. There is no group that helps eachother or has more of a community where we want to help guys like you get going.

And you'll have WAY more fun than you will in a class 11.

Cars available for sale for cheap these days too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

AZ7000'

Well-Known Member
#8
Rental, waaayyyy cheaper than buying/building, prepping, and chasing your own car. Then in a year or so you can decide if you can afford it. Bajaracingadventures.com is where the winner of this years SF250 in TT and TT Spec started.

Someone on here said take 5 $100 bills out to your BBQ and light them on fire, that's the same as hitting a rock and blowing up a wheel.... If you still feel good and not sick to your stomach then buy a race car and go for it!!!
 

NIKAL

Well-Known Member
#9
Hands down the 1600 class would be the best bet. 1600 class rules for the most part dont change, except for minor upgrades every few years if that, which any car can do. An older car can be just as competitive as a brand new car. Every single desert series runs the same rules, unlike many other classes. You can find good used 1600 cars for a reasonable price. Its truly a drivers class and what you learn in a 1600 car will help you, if you later decided to buy or build a faster class car. Also prepping a 1600 car is pretty easy, the biggest PITA is dealing with torsion bars and front leafs vs a coil-over shock. IMO anything with a metal body sucks to work around and repair.
 

JDDurfey

Well-Known Member
#10
If you are looking at Stock full you are not set on a buggy. If I had the money to start racing 4 wheels I would think about Jeepspeed. From everything I see it is a great group of people and you can pick up a used Jeepspeed that is nearly ready to race for a reasonable price. Prep costs are low. Entry fees are not outrageous and it looks like everyone is having a blast.

If you want to build your own, it looks to me like you could have a built Jeep for $20 grand or so if you do the work yourself. Paying someone else to build, you might as well buy a used one and modify or change it a little to your liking.
 

Capt223

Well-Known Member
#12
Just joined and am looking for some guidance on which class to pursue as a complete novice.

Did some basic internet research and the general consensus is that class 11 is for the novice but also looked at the Stock Full class and it appears that could be a possibility as well.

Any lessons learned will be greatly appreciated.

- Globalhub

As a novice I would think you would want to try different classes to see what the pros and cons are for each class. There are always pros and cons don't let anybody tell you otherwise.
I would suggest a rental program and there are a few out there.

My suggestion on your first step would be to reach out to Louis Chamberland who has just started a company called Fastline Racing School and provides off road driving lessons and a rental program too. He is located in Southern CA and has success in many classes of racing from 1600 to Trophy Trucks. He has a great temperament and can provide you a lot of knowledge to make sure you enjoy your move into off road racing.

He is a regular on this forum if you want his contact information send me a message.
 

Blackmutt

Well-Known Member
#13
Thanks for the quick reply. Sportsman 2000 is basically a stock truck, right?
Nope. Basic rules for Class 2000 are leaf springs, limited frame modifications and must have the required safety equipment. Most other items are open. However, sportsman entry fees are cheaper and class counts are going up. I suggest you buy an existing vehicle that's complete and had most of the bugs worked out. It's a lot faster and even cheaper than building something new from scratch with no prior experience in off-road racing.
 

frostbite36

Capt. Hindsight
#14
Class-9 buggies have always been designed as a starter class...do not go with a class without many rules like 1400 or 2000 trucks. Faster classes like class-5U, class-10, or class-12 are a bit much for someone without any experience. Other options might be 5-1600 or maybe 1/2-1600. You can go have fun on the cheap in 1/2-1600, but you won't come close to being competitive without big investments in time, experience, and some money because of lots of entries with lots of experience, but it's a lot of fun with so many cars in the class. I'd stay away from any class with a "stock" steel body as it complicates maintenance and repairs. It's a buyers market for race vehicles, so drive a hard bargain. DO NOT build a vehicle...there are so many nice ones already available for pennies on the dollar.

Another idea it to link up with other teams in the classes you are interested in and volunteer to help them to see what kind of issues they deal with...almost everyone welcomes the extra help at the races and in prep. That way you can get a little experience without jumping right into owning a car. Take your time deciding as it sucks to have to sell a car. Better get it right the first time.

Good luck!
 

offroadracer516

Well-Known Member
#15
1/2 1600 Log into Facebook | Facebook Always people willing to help. Good entry numbers pretty much anywhere you go. And you can get used cars for half as much as a new one. We had 45 cars at the snore rage at the river last year. 23 At Bap. And trust me old cars can compete. I am running a 1982 Race-co. Join the group and ask any questions if you have them! 1600 is Big on both sides of the border. But if you want something cheaper. Class 11 is still the best bang for your buck.
 

Attachments

J BomBer

Well-Known Member
#17
Class 11 or 1600 , if your gonna spend that much on renting a race car for one race you might as well save a bit more and buy your own car.
 

Zac Reish

Well-Known Member
#18
A lot of guys start in 5. You won't come out and win any big races, but you'll learn and have fun. There is no group that helps eachother or has more of a community where we want to help guys like you get going.

And you'll have WAY more fun than you will in a class 11.

Cars available for sale for cheap these days too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I would have to agree. Speaking of help. Just today Adam Spits (Class 5 coalition champion) who is from landers called me out of the blue to ask if I needed him to bring my car from the wiring guy in Landers to riverside as he was heading in my direction. I've raced him for a few years and had a few cold ones whenever we had time but just out of no where. Such a cool gesture. He saved me 5 hours and payed the wiring bill. There is not closer knit class than 5. Not to mention these cars are faster than, 9, 11, 1600, 3000, pacing class 12 and 10 these days. Plus they are way cheaper to maintain than 1600, 12, and 10. You really can't go wrong starting out with a 5 car.
 

BarrelRoll

Well-Known Member
#19
Golf Cart er I mean UTV is a decent place to start. Prep isn't too bad cost wise as long as you don't wreck it. They ride a lot better than a 9 or stock full, the class is growing, car counts are usually really good, and they are pretty fast compared to anything else level entry wise. I predict the market starts getting flooded with good BITD legal race proven naturally aspirated cars if it hasn't all ready, a ton of teams are moving up to turbo cars for next year.

Stock full is pretty much dead and is stupid expensive to prep if you are running hard. 11 cars can be expensive to prep and you are running 40 year old parts, check how many are running where you want to race, you might be running against your self or lumped into a class with all 1600cc vw's.

The car is the cheap part by the way. Entry fees, fuel, taking care of your crew, tools, prep, spares, the list goes on and on and on.

I agree with the helping a team and learning a bit about racing before buying a car. Look at a local series for starting out, they are much cheaper and a good spot to dial in a program. Our local Colorado series are about an hour drive, 2 hour races, loop races with 1 pit so you can usually get away with 1 or 2 guys on your crew, and entry fees are usually about $200-$400 per race. Class rules are also a bit different/ looser and sometimes a little easier on the budget.
 

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
#20
If you are truly new, I would maybe rent a ride, passenger seat, in just about any class you are interested in. You can buy a lap or 2 to see what it all about while being hooked up with an existing team. You WILL learn something from them, one way or another. Start small. Buy your suit and helmet and neck brace and post up a want ad looking for some right seat time. Cheaper than a car rental and gets you out there to see.

If you are set on buying a car, I would start with a 9 with the intentions of moving up after a couple years. This will allow you to learn prep and logistics without breaking the bank and the car will be worth just about what you paid for it when you bought in a couple years, so the 'cost' will be actual racing miles you put on it, not the massive loss of selling a car you built new. The next move would be into 1/2-1600. Once there, if you can drive, it will show and you will face some of the best competition there is, period. Most of the best racers came out of this class for a reason, so you should spend some time there. Or, if you find that after a year or 2 running the 9 car, you don't like it at all, you can sell it and not be stuck with a white elephant in the garage. From experience, running a steel bodied truck or car just makes working on it that much more of a PITA and actually ends up costing more because of it. Start with a small tube framed car and work up.
 
Top