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BITD

Cris Lepiz

Well-Known Member
#1
Hey guys, just wanted to see if anyone could offer some insight into BITD races. How are they compared to D37, similar courses, faster, more technical etc. Just picked up a new 450RX and am planning on doing a few races next year. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

BajaboundMoto

Well-Known Member
#2
Not similar.
Faster, MUCH faster.
Less technical.
(disregarding Mint 400, which should be technical)
IMO if you want a good intro to BITD / SCORE type racing do the BITD Parker 250 (January). It's got some crazy fast stuff and some beat up stuff, logistics are simple with just 2 pit areas, you'll experience what "fast" is, you won't have to contend with cars racing the same day.
Keep your bike basic, don't just throw $ at it.
 
#3
besides being faster and having longer fast sections, pit logistics are your own to figure out. there are designated pit areas you have to use in BITD, but you have to figure out how to get your gas/supplies there on your own. I.e. there is no remote gas trailer like in enduros and some of the district races. there are commercial pit services in some of the longer races, like Baja Pits you can hire. you'll also need a BITD transponder, which is bulkier than the little transporter strips in district and ama races. oh, and everything is more expensive ;-) Parker 250 is a good race to get a feel for it. Laughlin UTV championship is the most like a hare scramble. Silver State 300 is a good race to prepare for V2R.
 

Cris Lepiz

Well-Known Member
#4
Not similar.
Faster, MUCH faster.
Less technical.
(disregarding Mint 400, which should be technical)
IMO if you want a good intro to BITD / SCORE type racing do the BITD Parker 250 (January). It's got some crazy fast stuff and some beat up stuff, logistics are simple with just 2 pit areas, you'll experience what "fast" is, you won't have to contend with cars racing the same day.
Keep your bike basic, don't just throw $ at it.
besides being faster and having longer fast sections, pit logistics are your own to figure out. there are designated pit areas you have to use in BITD, but you have to figure out how to get your gas/supplies there on your own. I.e. there is no remote gas trailer like in enduros and some of the district races. there are commercial pit services in some of the longer races, like Baja Pits you can hire. you'll also need a BITD transponder, which is bulkier than the little transporter strips in district and ama races. oh, and everything is more expensive ;-) Parker 250 is a good race to get a feel for it. Laughlin UTV championship is the most like a hare scramble. Silver State 300 is a good race to prepare for V2R.
Thanks for the replies! The Mint 400 and UTV WC were two of the races I was planning on attending in 2019, but as of now its looks like I will try and run Parker, the only thing holding me up is having guys available to run pits. I'm assuming Parker is a grand prix finish?
 

Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
#5
Parker is usually a grand prix finish. Ironman only does 2 laps so it if you do not have problems it wont be an issue. You only need 2 people to pit you or team up with someone at midway.
 
#6
Thanks for the replies! The Mint 400 and UTV WC were two of the races I was planning on attending in 2019, but as of now its looks like I will try and run Parker, the only thing holding me up is having guys available to run pits. I'm assuming Parker is a grand prix finish?
I Ironman and self-pit at Parker 250. I just setup my stuff at the pit near the start/finish and then ride the whole lap (usually about 80 miles) without stopping at the remote pit. my bike has a range of 100+miles, depending on the tank I have installed. I don't know what the range of a crf450rx with stock tank is. you could setup your remote pit the night before, if needed. BITD will release a pit book in advance on their website that shows where the pits are and the distances involved (both race and pit miles). it's enough time to review and come up with a plan. the loop races are much easier to plan than a point to point like V2R. of course, it's much better if you have a helper, in case something goes wrong.
 

trentk

Well-Known Member
#7
I agree with all of the above and not only that but Parker is the most "technical" of the typical BITD races IMO. Its shorter but has far less of the "hold it wide open for 20 minutes and hope your engine doesn't blow up"sections of the longer races. Parker offers a bit of everything and pitting is super easy. You could show up with no help and easily find people to pit you at main and midway. If you just put out the word you need help here you will get the help you need and you can get your fuel to these folks at tech. The worst part is the early morning cold as hell start time and the hanging dust but thats the case for all BITD stuff. Good luck.
 

Cris Lepiz

Well-Known Member
#8
I Ironman and self-pit at Parker 250. I just setup my stuff at the pit near the start/finish and then ride the whole lap (usually about 80 miles) without stopping at the remote pit. my bike has a range of 100+miles, depending on the tank I have installed. I don't know what the range of a crf450rx with stock tank is. you could setup your remote pit the night before, if needed. BITD will release a pit book in advance on their website that shows where the pits are and the distances involved (both race and pit miles). it's enough time to review and come up with a plan. the loop races are much easier to plan than a point to point like V2R. of course, it's much better if you have a helper, in case something goes wrong.
I'll be testing the limits of my stock tank here in the coming weeks, but once IMS comes out with the new 19 tanks I'll definitely be upgrading. Like you stated it's nice to have someone there in case something bad happens, and I would say that's my biggest concern
 

Cris Lepiz

Well-Known Member
#9
I agree with all of the above and not only that but Parker is the most "technical" of the typical BITD races IMO. Its shorter but has far less of the "hold it wide open for 20 minutes and hope your engine doesn't blow up"sections of the longer races. Parker offers a bit of everything and pitting is super easy. You could show up with no help and easily find people to pit you at main and midway. If you just put out the word you need help here you will get the help you need and you can get your fuel to these folks at tech. The worst part is the early morning cold as hell start time and the hanging dust but thats the case for all BITD stuff. Good luck.
Any single track/ gnarly hills at any of the races?
 

rustyb

Well-Known Member
#11
Thanks for the replies! The Mint 400 and UTV WC were two of the races I was planning on attending in 2019, but as of now its looks like I will try and run Parker, the only thing holding me up is having guys available to run pits. I'm assuming Parker is a grand prix finish?
We will have 2 quad teams at Parker and would be glad to pit for you if you need.
 

BajaboundMoto

Well-Known Member
#14
Some of the fast roads we race on are 3, 4, 5 cars wide
That's one of my favorite things about Parker (especially when we bikes used to get to race a longer loop) and BITD races in general, the roads are SO FAST and safe it's crazy at times. Well, "safe" I mean comparred to Baja where you'd never hold it to the stop over a rolling blind hill or blind curve because in Baja you assume a civilian or chase truck is coming the opposite way, but BITD you're 99% sure it's clear over that hill.
They used to do a single track bikes only race but that was years ago.
Laughlin when it was just bikes was incredible single track. I'm hoping that's what they are shooting for with now including bikes in Mint (sorry quad guys).
 
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