Books

ntsqd

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Given your other question, start with Carroll Smith's "Engineer to Win", read it at least 3 times, then buy all of his other books. Van Valkenburg's and Adam's books are both good, each treats the subject slightly different which gives some perspective. What you'll find is that there is not a book written specifically for off road suspension design. This forces you to understand the topic well enough to extrapolate from the road racing oriented books. I think that is a good thing.
Re: Kritter's comment on 15" of motion with only 1* change in camber being impressive. That is impressive if they've also got a realistic roll center, bump steer, and anti-dive characteristics. The above books will help you understand just how hard that is to do.

TS

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Kritter

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I think the bumpsteer is less then 2 degrees. The rest I am unsure about. WE will see how good the truck performs this weekend at TT though.

KRis

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BradM

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All of Carrol Smith's books are good. I would suggest you start with Tune to Win as it is a little less technical than Engineer to win. Engineer to Win covers more of the theory behind materials, stresses, and so forth. It also gives some insight into calculations. It depends on your background and how much information you really want. Thom is right that Herb Adam's Racecar Engineering (I believe it is titled) is a pretty fair introduction into the subject area and a very easy read. You can also do a search in this forum for other texts. This topic has come up many times before.
 

ntsqd

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As it happens, Adam's book is on top of the stack to be put back into the bookcase. It's called "Chassis Engineering" and it is printed by HP Books. Van Valkenburg's book is called "Racecar Engineering & Mechanics" and is printed by same.

TS

"Teach you all I know and you're still stupid"
-- Howdy Lee
 

Bob_Sheaves

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As an addendum.... I was cleaning out my old reference material from my "library" (my wife calls it the junk room) and I ran across the 1976 Chevy Power manual from GM. It has a good basic section on suspension design-not too in depth, but would provide a good introduction to the terms used here and what they mean. Call it a primer for beginners....

Best regards,

Bob Sheaves
 

rdc

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Try this site.

<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.gmecca.com/byorc/>http:www.gmecca.com/byorc/</A>

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by THX1138 on 04/07/02 08:57 PM (server time).</FONT></P>
 
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