Brake Lines and Beams

MH20

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What is the best way to route brake lines on an I-beam truck to get them away from the coilover? Down the radius arm? or can you take them down the actual beam? Hard or braided stainless line?
 

SpareChangeRacng

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I've seen hardline from the master to just above the rad arm and then stainless line from there out, and I've seen hardline all the way down the rad arm and just flex line at the rad arm pivot and spindle connection.
I have also seen the lines run down the i-beams but it didn't look like the best solution to me. Steve
 

motoxscott

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I'm gonna do it like STeve said hard line to the frame above the radius arm mount, a short flex line to the radius arm, hard line down the radius arm and then a short flex line to the caliper.
 

Kritter

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get as much hard line in as possible...dont let any salesman weasle you into how badass their braided lines are...hands down not gonna feel as good as hardline.
 

Greg

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Run the lines through the limit strap tabs and use the lines as the linit straps, now that is careful use of hardware.
 

ntsqd

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"get as much hard line in as possible...dont let any salesman weasle you into how badass their braided lines are...hands down not gonna feel as good as hardline."

Kris, Have you ever tried this ? I have, twice. Once in a drag car, so it really doesn't count. You would be surprised at how good a wholy -3 flex plumbed system can feel.
For expediency, as in: "the car is leaving - have you finished plumbing the brakes or do we have to do that in Atlanta ?" we plumbed the whole car in -3 flex. By far not the cheapest way to go, but the pedal feel was extremely good. Pro road race driver never complained about feel or modulation. Drove it the whole season like that & was class champ that year.
Perhaps maker of the hose is important as we used Aeroquip exclusively on that car.

I DO NOT buy ready-made brake hoses. The crimped-on swivel fittings are very tiny btwn the end of the hose and the nut. They are extremely easy to break there and then you've got nothing to work with. Call Orme Bros. and make them up. It is not very hard & you can make the hose exactly the length you need. Get at least one of each kind extra adapter and two extra hose ends. Put them in your spares box in case you do rip a hose loose. They are field repairable.
 

Jerry Zaiden

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Kritter have you done this?????

Our race truck runs soft lines and the feel is great. We run it the whole way. The sand car to. Not any problems. I can see soft lines as a (pro) because a hard line can be pinched and craked by a rock. Last time I noticed the Herbst trucks also run soft lines the whole way and it also works for them.
 

tre5

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Race Mart in PHX makes brake lines for you guys that dont have the tools to make them yourself. They are the cheap crimps either. The are not very expensive though, my 24" with #3 on each end were $13 a piece. They have a lot of premade lengths, and they will make any size you want.
TRE5
 

tre5

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YEAH, I meant to say ---- They are NOT the cheap crimps.

TRE5
 

ntsqd

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Cutting the hose is the only hard part. And the only place you need a specialized tool. I've found that I prefer using a chop saw with the hose TIGHTLY wrapped in duct tape. I go very slow thru the hose trying not to fray it.
 
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