brake pads

BigB99

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Need new brake pads and i was wondering what everyone recommends. its for 98f150 with 35's thanks.
 

hoeker

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that's the same caliper i ran on my race truck. performance friction doesn't make a true race pad for that caliper, but they make what they call a Z series pad. this is what they told me to run. personally i didn't notice a difference, but i only ran them 1 race and sold the truck.

BTW they told me to get them from autozone. 60 bucks an axle i think.

i'm sure NTSQD knows what willwood offers for that aplication.

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ntsqd

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Nothing. That's what wilwood, to my knowledge, offers for that caliper. I'd try the Raybestos Brute Stops if they're made for that application.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

OGCamber

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I am pretty sure that Stillen in Costa Mesa, California has a set of metal matrix pads for that truck. They're right around $80 for the set. And NAPA has their severe-duty pads (Non-Ferrous Ceramic Backed) that are pretty darn good and they're available at all of the neighborhood NAPA stores. The part number on the NAPA pads for the 1998 2WD F-150 is RBPSD7558M. Hope this helps.

Courtney Halowell
Editor, StreetTrucks Magazine
www.streettrucksmag.com
 

ntsqd

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One thing to be aware of and that is the heat range of the pads. I know nothing about the Stillen pads, but pads like the Perf. Friction are intended to operate at a temp you will rarely achieve in the dirt. On the street it's a different story. You'll likely get enough heat in the rotors for the PF pads to work. The Brute Stops are a low temp pad. They will stop very well when 'cold'.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

hoeker

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maybe that's why i never noticed a change on my truck. interesting info. had i raced them more and got them hot, i may have appreciated it, as it was with one race, it was no big deal.

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ntsqd

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Let's say you got a race application where most of the time you want rear brakes to set the vehicle into a corner, but once in a while you really need to stop. IF you put a higher operating temp pad in the fronts and a cold pad in the rear brakes then what happens is the front pad's CF. is really low when cold while your rear pads are ready to work. So in a stab-it-to-set-it situation the rears will do most of the work. When you really need to stop you'll be on the brakes long enough for the front pads to warm up and come online.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

hoeker

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your saying you can hit the heat range in one use? i thought it would have to be considerably hotter than one good use would generate.
interesting concept, i just put dual brake pedals in the new truck, if i can't figure out how to drive it, i may try your idea.

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ntsqd

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It will be a matter of trial & error to find the right heat range for the front pads. My starting place guess would be to use one of the HD street pads like a PF. If you were to try something like a wilwood 'B' pad they would never warm up.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

CanyonMan

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I have used the Raybesots brute stop pads and shoes on all my cars since they first were introduced. I immediately shortenend my stopping distances by 20,30, or more feet depending on conditions. I was able to take the second turnoff at my local dragstrip instead of the third or fourth with stock type brakes. I also upgraded to a synthetic brake fluid as it drastically reduced the amount of boiling of my brake fluid. Before then, I flushed and bled my sytem 4 or 5 times a year. If you really want to stop, try the Raybestos Brute stop rotors. They are a vented and crossdrilled rotor that will bolt right up to the stock hub or axle and are relatively cheap (about $80-$100 a piece). I plan on replacing my pads and shoes with brute stop parts next brake job on my truck.

Lyrch
 

hoeker

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FWIW synthetic fluid is strongly discouraged in racing applications by every brake manufacture i've ever talked to. recomended for show cars and street rods only. i believe the reason is that rather than absorb mosture in the system like a dot3, it allows the moisture in the system to "pool" this will then cause even greater problems than the dot3 that has absorbed the moisture.

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BigB99

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i believe you can get them from local autoparts store there raybesto's (i knowed i miss spelled it) brute stops if im not mistaken
 

ntsqd

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I think you might have synthetic confused with silicone. Silicone is not hydroscopic (doesn't absorb H2O) which means it's boiling point is less affected by H2O in the system, or 'they' say. Silicone is also more compressable, by a noticeable amount at the pedal. The reason show car people like the stuff is that it is not hard on paint.

Most high boiling point racing brake fluids are either partly or completely synthetic. A race vehicle should have it's brake system completely flushed every season at the bare minimum. Highly prepped road racers start each race with new brake fluid.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

hoeker

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one more thing i learned new on this board, i stand corrected. so what's the advantage of the synthetic, boiling point only?? what about the hydroscopic properties? how do they compare to a dot3 fluid? what about compressability, is there and advantage?

to this point i have not been concerned about boiling point, we're not racing at martinsville, is boiling point a concern in a short course truck?? assuming the fluid is change every other race.

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ntsqd

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Any brake fluid not DOT 5 is glycol based, and therfore at least slightly hydroscopic. DOT 5 is the spec for silicone based brake fluid.
The use of synthetic base stocks is to increase the boiling point, or so that is my understanding of why synthetic base stocks are used.

From your previous description of the way uyou use the brakes I doubt boiling is an issue.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 
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