Bypass Tuning + Shock Q's

Marnes2986

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I know this question is real subjective and there are number of variables involved

BUT....when tuning a bypass for the rear (Leafsprung, Fox 3.0 bypasses) and lets say the valving is too "soft" or is "packing", How would you adjust both comp tubes??? or whats the best way?

-Would you twist the 1st adjuster on the shock shaft first, and leave the 2nd adjuster near the bump zone alone? then test
-Or leave the 1st adjuster alone and twist the 2nd adjuster near the bump zone? then test
-Or progessively adjust the 1st adjuster and 2nd adjuster simultaneously? then test

My impression is that trucks should let the rear wheels fall into whoop as fast as possible, therefore one should open rebound tubes all the way out (especially on leafspring trucks). Then What is the advantage of having "rebound valving"?

Thank you, any info is appreciated
 

Random Thoughts Racing

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Assuming yor shocks have the compression tubes running in tandem I would start by adjusting them in an equal number of turns. After you have the aproximate level of firmness you can stagger the tubes as needed.

Regarding rebound, just because it is relatively soft in comparison to compression dosent mean it isnt important to maintain control of. Packing is bad, but to much "springiness" can also be bad.

I know this question is real subjective and there are number of variables involved

BUT....when tuning a bypass for the rear (Leafsprung, Fox 3.0 bypasses) and lets say the valving is too "soft" or is "packing", How would you adjust both comp tubes??? or whats the best way?

-Would you twist the 1st adjuster on the shock shaft first, and leave the 2nd adjuster near the bump zone alone? then test
-Or leave the 1st adjuster alone and twist the 2nd adjuster near the bump zone? then test
-Or progessively adjust the 1st adjuster and 2nd adjuster simultaneously? then test

My impression is that trucks should let the rear wheels fall into whoop as fast as possible, therefore one should open rebound tubes all the way out (especially on leafspring trucks). Then What is the advantage of having "rebound valving"?

Thank you, any info is appreciated
 

Marnes2986

Active Member
Posts
30
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Assuming yor shocks have the compression tubes running in tandem I would start by adjusting them in an equal number of turns. After you have the aproximate level of firmness you can stagger the tubes as needed.

Regarding rebound, just because it is relatively soft in comparison to compression dosent mean it isnt important to maintain control of. Packing is bad, but to much "springiness" can also be bad.
So what youre saying is...when i start tuning my bypasses....what i do to one comp tube i should do to the other?

So if i turn the first stage compression tube i full turn i should turn the second stage compression one full turn as well?
 

Random Thoughts Racing

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So what youre saying is...when i start tuning my bypasses....what i do to one comp tube i should do to the other?

So if i turn the first stage compression tube i full turn i should turn the second stage compression one full turn as well?
If you are just starting out working with bypasses, or its a new truck and you are busy working on other things at the same time, making equal turns is easy to remember, hard to screw up, and will either get you into the ballpark or confirm you need a revalve.
 
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