Bypass Valving Question

desertspeed

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I picked up a pair of 3.0 18" triple bypasses for the rear of my truck from the classifieds here on RDC for my project (http://www.race-dezert.com/forum/showthread.php?t=51052). I have no idea what they were on originally, or what the valving is, so I had planned on sending them back to the mfr. (who shall remain nameless, but one of the big three) to be re-built and revalved. I called them yesterday to find out what information they needed to get the valving as close as possible for my truck- I figured they needed the weight of the truck front/rear, the unsprung weight of the rear axle, the lower link lengths, shock mounting location on the link, etc.

However, I was told that they really didn't need any of that information- all they needed to know was that it was a prerunner/desert truck and that it was linked. I questioned them on this, and he stated that they pretty much valve all shocks for a linked truck the same, no matter whether it was a ranger or a full size crew cab like mine. I even explained that since it was a crew cab, my links are a little shorter than most standard/extra cab trucks are, and he said that didn't matter. He said they didn't even need to know what the valving is in my coilovers.

What is everyone else's opinion on this? I find it hard to believe that a standard cab ranger should have the same valving as my truck, but I know nothing about shocks, so ???????

Anyone in San Diego that re-builds/valves shocks?
 

Random Thoughts Racing

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If you called Bilstein and got this answer from someone I apologize. I would have had you drop of the shocks for an inspection, revalve, and offer that I will be in plaster city next weekend for the MDR race and would be happy to help you tune the truck.

If its not a Bilstein Mirage can certainly help you out with service and valving.
 

BCG1

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I picked up a pair of 3.0 18" triple bypasses for the rear of my truck from the classifieds here on RDC for my project (http://www.race-dezert.com/forum/showthread.php?t=51052). I have no idea what they were on originally, or what the valving is, so I had planned on sending them back to the mfr. (who shall remain nameless, but one of the big three) to be re-built and revalved. I called them yesterday to find out what information they needed to get the valving as close as possible for my truck- I figured they needed the weight of the truck front/rear, the unsprung weight of the rear axle, the lower link lengths, shock mounting location on the link, etc.

However, I was told that they really didn't need any of that information- all they needed to know was that it was a prerunner/desert truck and that it was linked. I questioned them on this, and he stated that they pretty much valve all shocks for a linked truck the same, no matter whether it was a ranger or a full size crew cab like mine. I even explained that since it was a crew cab, my links are a little shorter than most standard/extra cab trucks are, and he said that didn't matter. He said they didn't even need to know what the valving is in my coilovers.

What is everyone else's opinion on this? I find it hard to believe that a standard cab ranger should have the same valving as my truck, but I know nothing about shocks, so ???????

Anyone in San Diego that re-builds/valves shocks?
Not to be ass but why don't you try it? Even if you get somebody to get them closer than they are now you'll still need to do some fine tuning on them. It's not brain surgery to take shocks apart and put them back together again. Just like anything else, you didn't know how to do it until you did it the first time.
 

woundedyak

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If you called Bilstein and got this answer from someone I apologize. I would have had you drop of the shocks for an inspection, revalve, and offer that I will be in plaster city next weekend for the MDR race and would be happy to help you tune the truck.

If its not a Bilstein Mirage can certainly help you out with service and valving.
Rep for Random coolness! ( is that even a word?)

Not to be ass but why don't you try it? Even if you get somebody to get them closer than they are now you'll still need to do some fine tuning on them. It's not brain surgery to take shocks apart and put them back together again. Just like anything else, you didn't know how to do it until you did it the first time.
I can't blame the guy for not wanting to rip apart a 18" 3.0 Bypass for the first time. That's a pretty expensive oops! Why don't you help a brother out and send him a doner shock with a cheat sheet :)
 

BCG1

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Rep for Random coolness! ( is that even a word?)



I can't blame the guy for not wanting to rip apart a 18" 3.0 Bypass for the first time. That's a pretty expensive oops! Why don't you help a brother out and send him a doner shock with a cheat sheet :)
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish............
 

loufish

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I can take apart a shock and put it all back togather...and do it right...and almost anybody with basic mechanical skills can be taught how to do so....But that's not really the OP's question...

The Magic is what to do after taking it apart guys...:p

That's something I would have no idea on where to start...I tried to explain it to someone else that knowing what you need the shock to do (more overall compression, more rebound, but not too much to avoid the rear end from "packing, etc,...) is a long way from knowing how to come up with the right valve stack and piston head....

Most of know that 12" of great valved travel beats 15" of junk...

I guess that's why my own shocks are heading back to me from a guy who knows a whole lot more about them then I do...:)
 

desertspeed

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Not to be ass but why don't you try it? Even if you get somebody to get them closer than they are now you'll still need to do some fine tuning on them. It's not brain surgery to take shocks apart and put them back together again. Just like anything else, you didn't know how to do it until you did it the first time.
I am already spending every second that I am not asleep, at work, or taking care of my kids trying to finish my truck. Yes, I could spend the time learning to re-build and tune shocks, and at some point I probably will because I think that it is a great skill to have, but right now I would rather pay someone who knows what they are doing.

While it is not brain surgery, it still takes tools, knowledge, and time- all of which I am in short supply of at the moment :)

I was just hoping that I could give the shock company some info about my truck, and they could get the valving close, or at least a good starting point. I am not in any way expecting it to be perfect.



Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish............
....and he will spend all day on a boat with his friends drinking beer?

I can take apart a shock and put it all back togather...and do it right...and almost anybody with basic mechanical skills can be taught how to do so....But that's not really the OP's question...

The Magic is what to do after taking it apart guys...:p

That's something I would have no idea on where to start...I tried to explain it to someone else that knowing what you need the shock to do (more overall compression, more rebound, but not too much to avoid the rear end from "packing, etc,...) is a long way from knowing how to come up with the right valve stack and piston head....

Most of know that 12" of great valved travel beats 15" of junk...

I guess that's why my own shocks are heading back to me from a guy who knows a whole lot more about them then I do...:)
Exactly-
 

Random Thoughts Racing

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The rear coil needs less valving than the bypass so that it does not overpower the bypass and make the adjustments less effective. Where is your coil valving at now?

Assuming that your bypass are 2 compression and 1 rebound are the compression tubes in tandem or sequential?
 

desertspeed

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The rear coil needs less valving than the bypass so that it does not overpower the bypass and make the adjustments less effective. Where is your coil valving at now?

Assuming that your bypass are 2 compression and 1 rebound are the compression tubes in tandem or sequential?
They are at .015 compression and .008 rebound, flutter stack.

Not sure about the bypas tubes- the shocks are getting re-built right now. I will see when I get them back.
 

bigtex

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That sounds right in the coilover. They will probly valve the bypasses 20 compression and 8 rebound.
 
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