Cage/Frame

In_the_works

Well-Known Member
Posts
305
Reaction
0
Does anyone have any pics of how they tied their cage into the frame? I'm contemplating building mine, but can seem to find any pictures or past posts regarding that aspect.
 

In_the_works

Well-Known Member
Posts
305
Reaction
0
So it is acceptable to attatch on the side of the frame? Did you then weld another plate onto the opposite side of the frame?
 

singlehanded

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,584
Reaction
0
what type and size plate did you use to attach that bar to? was It to just one plate in the floor of the cab that was welded to the floor, and you precut a big enough in floor to weld the tube to the bottom of the single plate? Did you do anything to the stock cab mounts you can see in that picture. And if you have any better shots of the bars connecting to the v bar could you post them please. Did you use smaller tubing for the seat mounts?
thanks a lot going to be getting started on mine this week hopefully, when I get my truck back from the shop.....
 

havahockey

Flipper
Posts
3,146
Reaction
725
The back hoop in the cab that the tube is from is 3 pieces. The piece you see in the picture is about 12" long and goes from the frame, through the cab, and sticks up about 6" from the cab floor. It is then welded and plated to the main structure of the hoop. Same thing on the other side. I attached another picture of the hoop in back.
 

Attachments

kjmiller1

Well-Known Member
Posts
65
Reaction
0
I wouldn't trust the frame to be strong enough to butt weld a tube to it on spots that take a lot of the load, I'm far from an expert but my friend and I built a little shock hoop to hold a 2.0 in high school and the hoop actually teared the frame. Sure it was poorly designed and it was a heavy suburban, but I was amazed how weak the frame was. I think a lot of people plate the area of the frame and then weld the tube to that
 

havahockey

Flipper
Posts
3,146
Reaction
725
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
Sure it was poorly designed and it was a heavy suburban

[/ QUOTE ]

There you go, the cage is tied into the frame in 6 points in the cab, and with engine cage and bedcage the whole cage is tied in to almost 20.
 

motoxscott

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,240
Reaction
299
That cab cage isn't even really built yet in that toyota. The back hoop was just put in so that the rear of the truck could be built. Once the in-cab portion is built, everything will be reinforced and gusseted. The whole point of a cage is to distribute loads so all the pressure isnt being put on just one mount.

-Scott
 

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,753
Reaction
266
Here is ours, and it to is to the frame in many places spreading the load about the frame.
 

Attachments

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,753
Reaction
266
The front.
 

Attachments

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,753
Reaction
266
another of the front
 

Attachments

singlehanded

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,584
Reaction
0
what about some cab cage shots where it connects to the frame and where it goes thru the floor?
thanks
 

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,753
Reaction
266
another of the rear closer up
 

Attachments

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,753
Reaction
266
For some reason I don't have any on my computer, and the truck is two hours away right now. Sorry!

Jason
 

Project1500

Well-Known Member
Posts
225
Reaction
0
Say your building a shock hoop and instead of welding it to the frame you make it so its bolt on. Is it better to make it bolt on or is it just a waste of time and should just weld it?
 

ACID_RAIN28

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,409
Reaction
60
The right way is not always the easiest way. Most of the class 8's can be unbolted 100% and striped to the bare frame.
 

Project1500

Well-Known Member
Posts
225
Reaction
0
They just do that though so if they bend or break something they can change it out quick and easier. Is there any pros or cons to welding a shock hoop to a frame opposed to bolting it?
 

motoxscott

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,240
Reaction
299
Generally, it takes more time and planning to have stuff bolt on and off rather than being welded directly and not compromise strength.

-Scott
 

In_the_works

Well-Known Member
Posts
305
Reaction
0
Having a modular(bolt on) cage does seem like a good idea, especially for a daily driver. At least that way if you roll, you can just swap cabs, and rebuild you cage based on your first one.
 
Top