• Forum membership has its advantages....

CALL for Support - Racers burned at Lucerne

Bricoop

Well-Known Member
Per Racrdude's post: "the pressure gauge was reading under 10Lbs. well below its 40 lb operating pressure." Obviously, the method used to monitor fuel pressure provided an indication of a problem prior to the catastrophic end results.
Agreed, you suggested adding a fuel pressure monitor. I asked an honest question of where it would be best to monitor that pressure. At the end of the fuel rail?
 

_

Well-Known Member
Agreed, you suggested adding a fuel pressure monitor. I asked an honest question of where it would be best to monitor that pressure. At the end of the fuel rail?
Bricoop, you misinterpreted my reply. I was not questioning the sincerity of your question.

Not all vehicles are plumbed in the same manner, so to suggest one specific location will work on all vehicles is not possible. While some vehicles may run a Dead-Head configuration, others may have a Return configuration. With a Dead-Head config, it will require two sensors to cover the entirety of the high pressure aspect of the fuel plumbing. With a Return config, a single pressure sensor will cover the entirety of the high pressure side of the fuel system. With this, you can see without greater knowledge of the vehicle's plumbing, I can not specify a location to monitor outside of: "Any and all, high pressure aspects of the fuel system."
 

BHollander

Well-Known Member
Bricoop, you misinterpreted my reply. I was not questioning the sincerity of your question.

Not all vehicles are plumbed in the same manner, so to suggest one specific location will work on all vehicles is not possible. While some vehicles may run a Dead-Head configuration, others may have a Return configuration. With a Dead-Head config, it will require two sensors to cover the entirety of the high pressure aspect of the fuel plumbing. With a Return config, a single pressure sensor will cover the entirety of the high pressure side of the fuel system. With this, you can see without greater knowledge of the vehicle's plumbing, I can not specify a location to monitor outside of: "Any and all, high pressure aspects of the fuel system."
I would venture to say that a pressure sensor would not be the best set up for this sort of monitoring. Most pumps out there far exceed the pressure we need therefore regulated fuel pressure drop may not be seen unless it was a gross leak like straight pumping without back pressure. If it was a simple crack or pin hole I believe it could go without detection as the pump could compensate. Now a flow meter with counts paired to engine rpms I believe would be the best bet. Maybe there are fuel pumps out there with this sort of technology I do not know. But a flow meter at the fuel pump or source of fuel if calibrated could tell you exactly the amount of fuel flowing and if a computer should see 2800 counts at 4500 rpms but really is seeing 3k counts then an error could be triggered and shut down pump immediately.
 

_

Well-Known Member
BHoll... Yes, flow meter(s) will provide for greater knowledge of the fuel system over pressure sensors. Note: I was not stating fuel pressure is the only method and/or sure all method to identify fuel system problems. I stated "help avoid these types of fires." In this case as described by RacrDude, the fuel pressure dropped from what should have been 40psi, to 10psi.
My point was, if a person utilizes an ECU or Digital display to control the fuel pump operation, and simultaneously monitors fuel pressure with the ECU/Display, the person should investigate setting parameters which will shut off the fuel pump when fuel pressure drops below what should be an acceptable fuel pressure while the engine is operating. In addition and as I previously stated, there are additional parameters which will need to be considered in this setup, but for the most part without getting into a long discussion on all configuration possibilities, fires of this nature may potentially be avoided with existing sensors and some additional programming.
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
i brought up escape hatches in roof at a drivers meeting &idea was tabled, my next build Will have buggy style roof hatch.period, also gonna eng.a door pin release handle that jettisons the whole door .i ve been thinking of all the aspects of motorsport fire since first conver. w- art 25 yrs ago, racers, practice, practice, Practice your egress training.window nets are not a standard, so make them obvious user friendly.my prayers go to the fellow racers. heal up! gotta make it to the next chk point!!
 

Acechase

Member
I know it has been some time since I last posted on Mike and Jared.
Jared is up and back to work at McComas Autobody. He has gain back much of his strength from prior to the fire. Still not quite 100 percent, but he would never let you know that. Working his normal hours, taking his kids to scouts, working on side projects( and honey do lists) and hanging out with his wife. Still in a bit pain, but manageable.
Mike is still on his way to recovery. He is currently home working through physical therapy with his wife. His road to recovery has been slow. Mike had spent so much time in a hospital bed that he lost a lot of his core strength. He is working hard to regain it. He is able to sit up for about 10 to 20 minutes at a time. He has just recently moved his desk to the house to start working again. His spirit is positive and upbeat. If you have his number send him a text or give him a call.
 

Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the update and glad that they are continuing to progress
 

pappawheely

O.G. Photo
I know it has been some time since I last posted on Mike and Jared.
Jared is up and back to work at McComas Autobody. He has gain back much of his strength from prior to the fire. Still not quite 100 percent, but he would never let you know that. Working his normal hours, taking his kids to scouts, working on side projects( and honey do lists) and hanging out with his wife. Still in a bit pain, but manageable.
Mike is still on his way to recovery. He is currently home working through physical therapy with his wife. His road to recovery has been slow. Mike had spent so much time in a hospital bed that he lost a lot of his core strength. He is working hard to regain it. He is able to sit up for about 10 to 20 minutes at a time. He has just recently moved his desk to the house to start working again. His spirit is positive and upbeat. If you have his number send him a text or give him a call.
Great news, thanks for the update.
 

mpinto

Member
From Dave Sykes:
"Mike McComas has been my brother Marc Stein's teammate, partner and off road vehicle builder for the past 20 years. On September 29, Marc and I drove the first out of 5 laps at the PCI 300 off road race in Lucerne Valley, in Marc and Mikes's newly built Textron UTV. During the third lap, the race car was being driven by Mike McComas and Co-rider Jared Dernberger and caught fire rapidly. While Jared managed to initially escape the car, Mike was still trapped in the fire. Jared heroically went back into the burning car multiple times to drag Mike free, severely burning himself in the process. Unfortunately, Mike sustained severe burns over much of his body. Their recovery time in the hospital could reach 6 months. We are asking for donations to help cover their medical and life expenses during both of their long roads to recovery. The off road community is a family and we really need your support at this time. Anything you can offer will truly be appreciated. "
 

mpinto

Member
We had a truck go up at the Reginals a couple weeks ago during my race. Luckily he was not hurt but you should of seen his nomex socks, completely singed. We all know what we are suppose to do before we climb into these machines but unfortunately its disasters like this that remind us...all over again. God speed boys
 
Top