cell fittings and lines

singlehanded

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Those of you that are not using steel braided and an fittings, what is good to use without being to cheap. Where can I get it at. any pics? Also what is the best way to strap cell in place over the top.
 

ntsqd

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Push-lok fittings can be had to work with the existing fittings in your cell. Be sure to use either Push-lok specific hose or Quality EFI fuel hose. Several of the race plumbing manufacturers offer aluminum versions of the Push-lok type of fitting.

These fittings will hold 80 psi (at least), but if it's a critical hose, like an engine oil cooler hose, I put a T&B tie-wrap over the hose btwn the barbs. Cinch it down snug, but not tight.
 

Jerry Zaiden

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If it is an EFI truck use a high quality steel braded line for your main fuel line. Use the less expensive stuf for your return and vent. Don't try to save money on your main line.
 

Kritter

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Give me the size and length of your main line and I will see if I can get you a break on price...I Hose-Man is in my complex.
 

ntsqd

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</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
If it is an EFI truck use a high quality steel braded line for your main fuel line.

[/ QUOTE ]

I don't feel that this is necessary for a non-race truck, but it is good insurance.
 

singlehanded

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Ya i am going to use steel braided for main line. but to cut down on expense what is typical to use for the other lines and fittings.
 

dezerts10

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anyone ever head of swedgelok?(sp?) its a hard line fitting and line system. a friend of mine at work used it for his sand jeep and its all hard line and able to with stand a ton of psi. something like 3000psi i think. are hard lines good or bad. i can get the majority of fo this type of set up for free through work. price isnt the main thing im considering but its just more avaliable right now for me to get.

Gregg
 

ntsqd

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The Push-lok fittings &amp; hose I posted earlier about will be fine for return &amp; vent lines.

Swagelok

Those are very nice fittings, and they are not cheap. In building the Ultra High Vacuum chambers I used more 316 SS 1/4" Swagelok fittings than I care to recall. Glad I wasn't paying for them.
PSI rating is size dependant, but 2k-3k psi is reasonable for the sizes used in fuel systems. They're so far beyond what today's fuel systems operate at (except diesels) that there's no worry of exceeding their pressure rating.

The best use I can see for this type of fitting would be to get an AN fitting on the end of a hard tube. Others make very similar fittings now that the patent has expired, try searching "Gyro-Lok" for example.
 

dezerts10

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Thom,

you saying that swaglok would be bitchen to do if i can get all the fittings? im pretty sure i can we do alot of work withtat stuff and if its better then most off the shelf lines i guess ill do it.
 

Kbach66

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Something to keep in mind with the hardline method is vibration, engine movement, etc. You really have to think about all possible flex points when running hard line, and if your motor isn't solid mounted, you'll probably end up having to run some sort of braided line between the hardline and the motor so that you won't stress the hardline and crack it over time. Just something to think about.
 

AllwaysRcn

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If you go with Swagelok, be sure to use "Swak" pipe thread sealant (made by Swagelok) on all your pipe thread connections.
 

curt

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Swagelok type fittings aren't that expensive in 1/4". At work we sell Gyrolok www.hoke.com fittings which have a couple of advantages over Swagelok fittings the biggest being you can't overtigten our fittings and ruin the fitting or valve bodies. A 1/4" male X 1/4" compression fitting is $5.65 all day long and I can ship from Northern California same day...The pressure rating is whatever the pressure rating of the tubing is, the tube will blow apart and the fitting will retain seal integrity, the pressure rating for 1/4" .035 is 5891 psi. I've been using this stuff on my braking system for 2 years now without any leaks. Curt
 

ntsqd

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They aren't exactly cheap in 316 Stainless Steel. Because of the need for little to no magnetic signature we had to use 316. Carbon steel fittings would have created an unacceptable magnetic field.

I would use this type of fitting to get an AN fitting on the end of a hard line for the transition to flex line. The preferred fitting would be a X size tube by x size AN bulkhead fitting put thru a tab or some such. This allows you to anchor the end of the hard line securely and convert to AN for the flex line to connect to.
 

curt

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At that price I was talking about 316 ss parts, in all ways easily equal to the Swagelok parts(double ferrule, high pressure available in Brass, S/Steel, Monel, Hastalloy, Inconel, Carbon, etc...) been selling them for 15 years...they aren't that expensive until you run past 1/2" then they're bank, our fuel supply is all braid because I didn't think of it at the time when I did it....I also think we have some compression to an adapters as well, all said and done, I can do it cheaper in hard line than braided and don't have to worry about the abrasion problems that the braided line can cause.

Another fuel system trick I recently learned- After one of the other guys in our class had a difficult to diagnose fuel supply problem that turned out to be deteriorating cell foam in the pump and filters on his Toyota, he put a cheap plastic see through filter before the in-line pump(before the line is high pressure) to get a visual indicator of a fuel foam clog. Its so simple I don't know why I didn't think of it years ago, duh...Curt
 

ntsqd

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Yes, but you are talking Gyrolok. I'm talking Swagelok in 1986 when they pretty much had a lock (no pun intended) on the market. Some of the 1/4" fittings I used were $20 each back then.
 
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