Clocking Outboard CV's

TreyP

"F" you Bill
I've read the threads on CV install and clocking 930's. I have 934/935 CV's on Summer Brothers outboard hubs. Is it necessary to clock them and if so how? The only way I can think of is to pre assemble them and mark the axle and star. Then put it together aligning the marks.

Just checking before I f' something up or waste too much time doing something for nothing.
 

joe1369

Well-Known Member
I am looking forward to someone with an easy answer for this, I clock mine, pain in the ass, eyeball and verify with a piece of allthread I stick in from the outside of the midboard hub through a bolt hole, with the wheel jacked up so it is parallel to the transmission cv flange. If I miss, then I pull out the allthread lower down and re-clock the wheel side a couple splindes over and check again!!!!:D
 

Dumfast

Well-Known Member
First off I know zero about CVs....Is clocking really needed?...On a U-joint driveshaft I understand with the very high RPMs, but with a much slower spinning outboard CV I don't get it or is it a friction/movement thing that is involved?..Just trying to understand the issue
 

joe1369

Well-Known Member
First off I know zero about CVs....Is clocking really needed?...On a U-joint driveshaft I understand with the very high RPMs, but with a much slower spinning outboard CV I don't get it or is it a friction/movement thing that is involved?..Just trying to understand the issue
I guess we need one of the prep gods to chime in. I do it because I was told it was the best way to do it. I have not tried it without clocking, need someone with a 16 car that is tweeking those 930's to 28 to 30 degrees to help out here. MHO is they seem to bind less if they are clocked, when you are at 25 degrees or above.:p
 

TreyP

"F" you Bill
Working on an idea Joe. Will post it if it works. I know someone out there has a better way of doing it, but I guess they don't want to post it. Bean is on Vacation so I can't get any info from him.
 

Robin Hood

Well-Known Member
Since they say there is no dumb question I have to ask. What does it mean to clock your CVs? I am not new to this I just have never heard the term.
 

joe1369

Well-Known Member
Since they say there is no dumb question I have to ask. What does it mean to clock your CVs? I am not new to this I just have never heard the term.
It means to align the outside cv and the inside cv exactly the same relative to rotation, then you can squeeze maximum angle out of them.
 

TreyP

"F" you Bill
Yes that is a very informative article, and tells you everything you need to know if your using microstubs, but we are looking for a trick to clock a midboard hub set-up more easily!!!!! Need PREP GODS input.:D
Here's what I came up with.

I placed the axle on two v-blocks and clocked the CV's (narrow to wide) then clipped the trans side CV. On the outboard cv I used a carbide scribe to lightly mark the alignment. Do not use a etching tool. Then I installed the axle and aligned the outboard CV to the mark. Greased it all up and tightened (w/ blue locktite) it up to 45 ft/lb.

That was the easiest way I could think of.

And greasing these things is a pain in the rear!! What a mess. I'm going to have to figure a way to clean and grease these better next time.
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
It means to align the outside cv and the inside cv exactly the same relative to rotation, then you can squeeze maximum angle out of them.
There is no need to clock CV's. It will also do nothing for the amount of angle you get out of them. The amount of power/weight/traction dictates how much angle you can run on them. You will never actually use all the angle on a CV.
 

Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
And greasing these things is a pain in the rear!! What a mess. I'm going to have to figure a way to clean and grease these better next time.
I know how to grease them easier and no worrying about grease between the cv and the drive plate.

There is no need to clock CV's. It will also do nothing for the amount of angle you get out of them. The amount of power/weight/traction dictates how much angle you can run on them. You will never actually use all the angle on a CV.
I agree 100%. Never had an issue and have never wasted my time. Spinning the axles the wrong way on the other hand is a huge no no.
 

manualshifter

Well-Known Member
AW: Re: Clocking Outboard CV's

I agree, that there is no need in clocking CV-joints. CV´s have a continious movement/ kinematic. That means, there angle is not a function of the rotational alignement of the joints too eachother. The joints should not even influence eachother in terms of the angle. It would be different with tripods, but for CVs... I don´t see a technical reason for it.
Better spend your time in making them low friction...
 

powerbox_builder

Well-Known Member
Re: AW: Re: Clocking Outboard CV's

I agree, that there is no need in clocking CV-joints. CV´s have a continious movement/ kinematic. That means, there angle is not a function of the rotational alignement of the joints too eachother. The joints should not even influence eachother in terms of the angle. It would be different with tripods, but for CVs... I don´t see a technical reason for it.
Better spend your time in making them low friction...

Yup...Constant Velocity joint. Get it? Those Germans figured it out for us a long time ago.
 
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