Co-Driver responsibilities

slvrbullet

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What does everyone require of their Co-Drivers before, during and after a race? Do you require Co-drivers bring something to the table in order to ride, if so what?
 

drofmij

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What does everyone require of their Co-Drivers before, during and after a race? Do you require Co-drivers bring something to the table in order to ride, if so what?

My co driver is my wife. So she better bring a sammich to the table


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Total Loss

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#1 responsibilty of co-dawg...take ALL the hits, trash, bushes, trees and anything else the driver can run over or through.
 

LAZY-H

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I believe this sums it up !

“All I want to hear out of you is “speed zone”, “we’re on fire,” and “I got the fat chick.” Zambo
 

Ridelikeadiesel

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I can respond from a co-dawgs pov. I've ridden in 15 races over the last 3 years, with 2 different teams. Almost all of them were in 10 cars. I'm incredibly lucky because I have the ability to learn quickly and try to work a ton to earn my spot. On both teams, I help prep cars, usually on a weekly basis. I spend a ton of time studying the courses and making notes before leaving the house. On pre-runs I do everything possible to learn the course quickly. Drivers will laugh but I consider myself a coach, psychiatrist, mechanic, and comedian. I seriously try to do everything possible to make it so that my drivers only have to focus on driving. Sometimes I have to buy my membership for the year, others not. With one team I am responsible for my own food and quarters at the race, on the other I am spoiled. Skills wise, I can do most prep tasks without supervision but I enjoy working with the team in the shop. Again some people will laugh but, I also bring the ability to get along with people and make my teams look good in public. That is probably a short list, but others will add details I'm sure. I will add one last detail. My main driver thought it would be fun to make a clip of my greatest hits from a really long day. Beware the language.

 

KTB Racing

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Nobody rides for free. Either help prep the truck or provide some kind of service/product that helps get the truck ready. I have yet to find someone who is willing to actually put in the time to help get the truck ready in exchange for co driving so I normally end up selling the seat as an arrive and ride deal. I would actually prefer help because getting the truck ready always kicks my ass lol.

During the race their job is to watch the mirrors, guages, and the gps in that order but mostly the mirrors. Im used to having people in the truck that aren’t really familiar with it so I tend to watch everything myself too. Im still pretty green when it comes to desert racing and I've only done one race where the co driver actually needed to navigate for me so the gps so far has mostly been for calling out mph through speed zones.
 

Soupy

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As a co-dog I've thought my job was to do whatever the driver asked me to do. Definitely always making sure I'm carrying my weight, and then some. Never a shortage of work to do and I doubt many racers truly got done everything they really wanted to get done. They get the done the "Have to get done" list. But, there is always the "When there is time" list. The driver has got one job, and a million tasks. Anything I can do to off load tasks he's willing to let go is ripe for me to do. I've used my truck to pull race car and trailer to the race so the driver (and owner) could focus on getting his family and kids there. He covered the extra fuel costs. Without family support, all is lost. I probably could have got a little help with hotels etc. but I always wanted to not burden him and his family with my needs. His wife always made sure everyone was fed. I know some race teams have budgets but I doubt many are actually making money hand over fist. I look at my expenses as the "ticket to the show". I've had experiences I cherish more than any ticket from a travel brochure could get me. If I could ever get a co-dog ride again, I'd give my left nut (as long as I get to keep my right nut I'll be good). Words don't exist to describe the experience a co-dog gets to have. Then again co-dogging is not for everyone.

I totally agree with coach, psychiatrist, mechanic, and comedian. I'm all ears as a co-dog. Lots of "did you hear that?" "where do you think its coming from?" discussing potential problems, handling radio communication, so the driver can drive. if we bust as we are rolling to a stop, I'm usually ask/telling what I'm going to do. Drivers heads can get all wrapped up in driving and take a bit to unravel and get in mechanic mode. I'm a talker by nature, but I also think its up to my job to keep the communication going, especially late at night when you are 18 hours into a race. :)
 
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Soupy

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Ridelikeadiesel ... I used to have the same "Right vs. Left" problem until i figured out how to recognize fatigue. 6-7 hours in to the race I'd get that problem. My brain was calling out the biggest curve I saw on the GPS, not the next turn. I had to write "R" and "L" on my gloves. And the day before the race... start drinking water, like mad. the morning of the race if I didn't piss twice before we started racing I hadn't drank enough water. then alternate water, gaterade, water, gatorade, water race long. And graze on food all race long, 1/4 - 1/2 sammich handed in the window in the pits, beef sticks and granola bars in the car. drink lots, eat bites.
 

Soupy

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Yes! like that ... see how the co-driver kept up the communication. Driver not many words. And the co-driver took ALL the hits, trash, bushes, trees. And why was the co-driver so concerned? He probably had to prep the car for the next race :)

I'd say... very good teamwork there ... ha ha ha
 

SummerTime

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Everything depends on the driver and what he wants. Some drivers don't want a lot of talk, others depend on it to navigate the course at any speed. It is imperative for a team focused on winning to have a co - driver with a decent amount of mechanical knowledge.

Typically it breaks down like this for me:

You have the cheat codes to the course on the GPS, if your driver wants/needs the input. I try to be extremely concise with my radio communication, all of my verbiage is unique so that there is no misunderstanding and to ensure the mic cuts on when i speak.

GPS:

- Call out turns and dangers, not just corners that are going too fast for, but also corners where we could be going faster
- modulate severity of corner callouts and distance to corner/ timing of callout relative to speed of the car
- Give positive feedback on the straight - aways to continue at speed if the driver dabs the brakes.
- in the dust where we cant see, keep us from hitting that spec truck that is stuck in the middle of the road for no reason
- make absolutely certain we hit VCP's and checkpoints

Radio:

- strained communication with chase team that inevitably ends in frustration
- callout when we start race
- no, we weren't that car that wadded it in the infield
- communicate with weatherman if need be
- mileage callouts on the radio to chase team
- damage report/what is expected of the chase crew at pit stops
- pit stop location communication with chase team
- is the volume too high on the intercom? i can handle that

For the driver:

- Smash the pass button repeatedly on the Stella / Racing Trax
- siren at full song when passing spectators or trying to pass someone
- assure him that no one is trying to pass us because we are obviously the fastest car on course
- understand race rules and ensure they don't get broken in such a way that will get your team penalized
- driver doesn't get out of the car unless we are DNF - ing or upside down / on fire
- provide lens cleaning rag when driver needs it
- provide water for driver when needed
- waving at other drivers that pull out of the way for us
- screaming at the car in front of us that wont get out of the way
- remind him that it costs us three minutes if he slays the tires up that rocky hill or through that rock garden
- Have fun in the passenger seat
- Positive moral support for the driver, positive reinforcement of great driving skills when demonstrated (we all like to have a good time in the car)
- make sure he is in good mental standing
- watch mirrors
- record approximate position in class
- stop at stop check

For the car:

- get us un - stuck
- don-t let the silt swallow the impact or jack
- put the jack back on the car properly so you don't screw the next group of drivers
- tire changes aren't a chore, but a chance to show off your impressive gains
- fix mechanical problems (that alternator that no longer supplies voltage)
- put a belt on the car
- clean light bar with swiffer duster
- watch gauges like a voyeur and his kink
- record top speed of car when possible

General:

- understand how to operate chase truck
- understand how to operate race car
- when pre-running, plan places to pit
- remember to bring a lighter on night runs
- mark dangers
- find alternate lines around silt / bottlenecks
- fire DJ
- help prep car whenever possible
- nobody wants to mount tires? you do. Don't forget the anti-seize
- no idle hands if people are working
- meal prep beast
- how many pop tarts and gatorades can you fit in a yeti cooler?
- bitchin pre-runner team selfie along the coast
- drive the chase truck home from El Rosario at midnight
- its raining at night and the pre-runner doesn't have a windshield wiper? drive that home too
- be prepared enough that you aren't a burden. IE: bring enough jackets to drive the pre-runner home from EL Rosario in the rain.
- be passionate about off road racing and have fun, you are blessed to be here.

i'm sure i missed some stuff
 

Big Whitey

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Everything depends on the driver and what he wants. Some drivers don't want a lot of talk, others depend on it to navigate the course at any speed. It is imperative for a team focused on winning to have a co - driver with a decent amount of mechanical knowledge.

Typically it breaks down like this for me:

You have the cheat codes to the course on the GPS, if your driver wants/needs the input. I try to be extremely concise with my radio communication, all of my verbiage is unique so that there is no misunderstanding and to ensure the mic cuts on when i speak.

GPS:

- Call out turns and dangers, not just corners that are going too fast for, but also corners where we could be going faster
- modulate severity of corner callouts and distance to corner/ timing of callout relative to speed of the car
- Give positive feedback on the straight - aways to continue at speed if the driver dabs the brakes.
- in the dust where we cant see, keep us from hitting that spec truck that is stuck in the middle of the road for no reason
- make absolutely certain we hit VCP's and checkpoints

Radio:

- strained communication with chase team that inevitably ends in frustration
- callout when we start race
- no, we weren't that car that wadded it in the infield
- communicate with weatherman if need be
- mileage callouts on the radio to chase team
- damage report/what is expected of the chase crew at pit stops
- pit stop location communication with chase team
- is the volume too high on the intercom? i can handle that

For the driver:

- Smash the pass button repeatedly on the Stella / Racing Trax
- siren at full song when passing spectators or trying to pass someone
- assure him that no one is trying to pass us because we are obviously the fastest car on course
- understand race rules and ensure they don't get broken in such a way that will get your team penalized
- driver doesn't get out of the car unless we are DNF - ing or upside down / on fire
- provide lens cleaning rag when driver needs it
- provide water for driver when needed
- waving at other drivers that pull out of the way for us
- screaming at the car in front of us that wont get out of the way
- remind him that it costs us three minutes if he slays the tires up that rocky hill or through that rock garden
- Have fun in the passenger seat
- Positive moral support for the driver, positive reinforcement of great driving skills when demonstrated (we all like to have a good time in the car)
- make sure he is in good mental standing
- watch mirrors
- record approximate position in class
- stop at stop check

For the car:

- get us un - stuck
- don-t let the silt swallow the impact or jack
- put the jack back on the car properly so you don't screw the next group of drivers
- tire changes aren't a chore, but a chance to show off your impressive gains
- fix mechanical problems (that alternator that no longer supplies voltage)
- put a belt on the car
- clean light bar with swiffer duster
- watch gauges like a voyeur and his kink
- record top speed of car when possible

General:

- understand how to operate chase truck
- understand how to operate race car
- when pre-running, plan places to pit
- remember to bring a lighter on night runs
- mark dangers
- find alternate lines around silt / bottlenecks
- fire DJ
- help prep car whenever possible
- nobody wants to mount tires? you do. Don't forget the anti-seize
- no idle hands if people are working
- meal prep beast
- how many pop tarts and gatorades can you fit in a yeti cooler?
- bitchin pre-runner team selfie along the coast
- drive the chase truck home from El Rosario at midnight
- its raining at night and the pre-runner doesn't have a windshield wiper? drive that home too
- be prepared enough that you aren't a burden. IE: bring enough jackets to drive the pre-runner home from EL Rosario in the rain.
- be passionate about off road racing and have fun, you are blessed to be here.

i'm sure i missed some stuff
poop. Call me I need you to school my kid on some of this, mostly help prep
 

TrentFleck

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Everything depends on the driver and what he wants. Some drivers don't want a lot of talk, others depend on it to navigate the course at any speed. It is imperative for a team focused on winning to have a co - driver with a decent amount of mechanical knowledge.

Typically it breaks down like this for me:

You have the cheat codes to the course on the GPS, if your driver wants/needs the input. I try to be extremely concise with my radio communication, all of my verbiage is unique so that there is no misunderstanding and to ensure the mic cuts on when i speak.

GPS:

- Call out turns and dangers, not just corners that are going too fast for, but also corners where we could be going faster
- modulate severity of corner callouts and distance to corner/ timing of callout relative to speed of the car
- Give positive feedback on the straight - aways to continue at speed if the driver dabs the brakes.
- in the dust where we cant see, keep us from hitting that spec truck that is stuck in the middle of the road for no reason
- make absolutely certain we hit VCP's and checkpoints

Radio:

- strained communication with chase team that inevitably ends in frustration
- callout when we start race
- no, we weren't that car that wadded it in the infield
- communicate with weatherman if need be
- mileage callouts on the radio to chase team
- damage report/what is expected of the chase crew at pit stops
- pit stop location communication with chase team
- is the volume too high on the intercom? i can handle that

For the driver:

- Smash the pass button repeatedly on the Stella / Racing Trax
- siren at full song when passing spectators or trying to pass someone
- assure him that no one is trying to pass us because we are obviously the fastest car on course
- understand race rules and ensure they don't get broken in such a way that will get your team penalized
- driver doesn't get out of the car unless we are DNF - ing or upside down / on fire
- provide lens cleaning rag when driver needs it
- provide water for driver when needed
- waving at other drivers that pull out of the way for us
- screaming at the car in front of us that wont get out of the way
- remind him that it costs us three minutes if he slays the tires up that rocky hill or through that rock garden
- Have fun in the passenger seat
- Positive moral support for the driver, positive reinforcement of great driving skills when demonstrated (we all like to have a good time in the car)
- make sure he is in good mental standing
- watch mirrors
- record approximate position in class
- stop at stop check

For the car:

- get us un - stuck
- don-t let the silt swallow the impact or jack
- put the jack back on the car properly so you don't screw the next group of drivers
- tire changes aren't a chore, but a chance to show off your impressive gains
- fix mechanical problems (that alternator that no longer supplies voltage)
- put a belt on the car
- clean light bar with swiffer duster
- watch gauges like a voyeur and his kink
- record top speed of car when possible

General:

- understand how to operate chase truck
- understand how to operate race car
- when pre-running, plan places to pit
- remember to bring a lighter on night runs
- mark dangers
- find alternate lines around silt / bottlenecks
- fire DJ
- help prep car whenever possible
- nobody wants to mount tires? you do. Don't forget the anti-seize
- no idle hands if people are working
- meal prep beast
- how many pop tarts and gatorades can you fit in a yeti cooler?
- bitchin pre-runner team selfie along the coast
- drive the chase truck home from El Rosario at midnight
- its raining at night and the pre-runner doesn't have a windshield wiper? drive that home too
- be prepared enough that you aren't a burden. IE: bring enough jackets to drive the pre-runner home from EL Rosario in the rain.
- be passionate about off road racing and have fun, you are blessed to be here.

i'm sure i missed some stuff
And this is why I love being co-dawg for SummerTime... He puts it all out on the table. I cannot stress the importance of good/clear communication enough. Understanding your driver goes a long way just as it does the other way around. At the end of the day it is the team who gets the car to the finish line. I look at my driver as a team member/friend. We both want to achieve the same goal. I personally want to know I am doing a good job or know that I am forgiven on a bad call. Once a driver and co-driver can establish a good working relationship, they are already miles ahead of the other teams...
 

LAZY-H

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- get us un - stuck

^^^ very important !
D8A9B3A0-BE56-4E68-8BF8-6DD9A9C4D027.png
 

offroadracer516

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My co rider lives across the country. So he doesn't ever get to help with prep. He is required to Pay the entry fee and sometimes race fuel too. Put water in my camel back and strap it in the car. Help wash the car off after qualifying and each day for bap and rage. Check tire pressure. Check the oil sometimes. Since he misses prep. By the time we get to the race all I want to do is drive the car. I want him to hand me the water hose in the car when I ask for it. Tell me how fast we are going in speed zones. Watch the mirror. Hit the horn. If we race a longer race. He's calling out every single turn on the gps. Putting in the marks on the gps if we pre run. He's changing the tire and getting us unstuck if at all possible. That's about it. Here is Brian and I on our way to a top 3 out of 55 cars in 1600 at the 2017 Snore/More Rage at the river.
 
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johndjmix

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Besides the race stuff, help with prep. What im starting to do is, the one on my team that helps prep the most gets to co-drive that race. Makes sense.

--John
 
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