Co-driving

Wasson Racing

Well-Known Member
Does anyone have any good tips on co driving? Like about when I should tell the driver when theres a turn or "skull and cross bones"
 

JRod

fast-aid.org
Does anyone have any good tips on co driving? Like about when I should tell the driver when theres a turn or "skull and cross bones"
In my mind, the main thing is consistency - Find a level you like and set the GPS to the same zoom setting all the time. That way, even if 100 yards is actually 300 yards, your driver will know what to expect. Practice this out testing/pre-running so that there are no surprises 3 miles into your first race, because remember, if you say 200 yards, and your driver perceives 300 yards and it's actually 100 yards, your race could be over.

Also, ask your driver what he/she likes - Some drivers like a lot of talking, constant updates on guages, mirrors, GPS etc..... Other drivers don't like the noise and only want to hear turns/cautions/if the gauges are bad/someone's on your bumper.

Finally, get to know everything you possible can about the car so that when you have to jump out in a haze of dust or haze of wondering WTF just happened to make the car stop, you aren't also bewildered as to where the toolbag is, jack is, etc etc etc.

Oh yeah, Bring food/water/energy drinks just in case you're stuck somewhere for a while - And HAVE FUN!
 

DOG ON

RDC's illegal immigrant
Well, the codriver mostly has to be aware of everything the driver cant.......He must focus on engine gauges, most communications with chase crews & pits , the GPS and making the driver know in advance points of importance, help him navigate specially while passing in dusty conditions, also while the driver focus on the near range of vision, the codog also helps with the long range....think of it as the driver concentrates on the low beam range and the codog on the hibeam range.

I have very limited experience, I am sure many here can put it better and add to this
 

green787

Well-Known Member
Watch some in car footage from the Rally people, they have it down to a science....
 

WastedWages

Well-Known Member
Keep the driver cool and calm , a upset driver tends to make mistakes . Keep him informed of your surrounding . And like Jrod said get to know your race vehicle and driver as well as you can. By knowing your driver you can predict the lines he will take and help him threw them.
 

DSRacing

Mini Metal MOD
In my mind, the main thing is consistency - Find a level you like and set the GPS to the same zoom setting all the time. That way, even if 100 yards is actually 300 yards, your driver will know what to expect. Practice this out testing/pre-running so that there are no surprises 3 miles into your first race, because remember, if you say 200 yards, and your driver perceives 300 yards and it's actually 100 yards, your race could be over.

Also, ask your driver what he/she likes - Some drivers like a lot of talking, constant updates on guages, mirrors, GPS etc..... Other drivers don't like the noise and only want to hear turns/cautions/if the gauges are bad/someone's on your bumper.

Finally, get to know everything you possible can about the car so that when you have to jump out in a haze of dust or haze of wondering WTF just happened to make the car stop, you aren't also bewildered as to where the toolbag is, jack is, etc etc etc.

Oh yeah, Bring food/water/energy drinks just in case you're stuck somewhere for a while - And HAVE FUN!
That cover's just about everything,

Our last race, my regular co-driver wasn't able to race due to an injury. One of our crew members filled in and it was his first time in the vehicle. I spent the previous night and the morning of the race quizzing him on all these issues.

The first thing I talked about was priorities, (Gauges, GPS, mirrors) listening to and talking on the radio and proper radio etiquette. I made sure he knew where all the switches were and his responsibilities if we had to get out of the truck to change a flat or fix a problem.

I'm one of those drivers who don't like a lot of talk in the car. It's a distraction to me to have someone constantly chatting away. When we got in the car, it took him the first lap to get used to calling out hazards as they appeared on the GPS. He would call out a hazard as soon as he saw it on the screen but the zoom was set so far out it was still 30 sec. or more away. Once he changed the zoom and got his timing down, he did an excellent job. He let me know what was coming up, he was calling out mile markers and CPs on the radio without me having to prompt him.

We had some transmission problems during the race and he did a good job keeping me informed on the temps. We had to stop a few times and he was always the first one one of the truck and checking things out. For a first timer, I was impressed with the job he did and I made sure he knew it after the race.
 

D. Freeman

Well-Known Member
Infidel I like your hi/low beam analogy. Have a dust towel with you to make sure your driver has as a clear view.
 

D. Freeman

Well-Known Member
Hey DS I was the guy who blew in your breather to get u guys re-fired after the fuel. I totally thought you guys were messing with me when you said to blow in the breather Thanks for the buzz ha ha see ya at the races.
 

JRod

fast-aid.org
Keep the driver cool and calm , a upset driver tends to make mistakes . Keep him informed of your surrounding . And like Jrod said get to know your race vehicle and driver as well as you can. By knowing your driver you can predict the lines he will take and help him threw them.
How could I forget? You're the motivational speaker for the guy holding the steering wheel! Whether it's calming him down or talking him out of quitting....

Oh yeah, and get some thick skin, cause you can also plan on being the whipping boy..... As I heard Pistol say, flats and wrecks are always the co-dawgs fault - LOL!
 

WastedWages

Well-Known Member
How could I forget? You're the motivational speaker for the guy holding the steering wheel! Whether it's calming him down or talking him out of quitting....

Oh yeah, and get some thick skin, cause you can also plan on being the whipping boy..... As I heard Pistol say, flats and wrecks are always the co-dawgs fault - LOL!
LOL I have been blammed for a flat or two . But I have really thick skin , so its no problem !
 

hammer down racing

Well-Known Member
LOL I have been blammed for a flat or two . But I have really thick skin , so its no problem !
Oh, come on!!! If you don't call it, I don't see it.:D

I definately know the difference between a great codriver and just a body in the seat. A great codriver keeps the driver informed of everything and keeps his ego in check. There have been many times Jon has saved my ass in a race by keeping me calm. There are a few cars out there that should thank him, he saved thier car.:D A codriver should be the cheerleader. Let the driver know when he's doing good and pep him up when he's suckin hind teet.
 

hammer down racing

Well-Known Member
I definately know the difference between a great codriver and just a body in the seat. A great codriver keeps the driver informed of everything and keeps his ego in check. There have been many times Jon has saved my ass in a race by keeping me calm. There are a few cars out there that should thank him, he saved thier car.:D A codriver should be the cheerleader. Let the driver know when he's doing good and pep him up when he's suckin hind teet.
And brass balls.:D
 

BANNED4LIFE

Well-Known Member
a good navigator makes all the differnce in the world......check utube for any of my incar that has live intercom feed and you can get the idea.................
 

Mark Newhan

Well-Known Member
a good navigator makes all the differnce in the world......check utube for any of my incar that has live intercom feed and you can get the idea.................
Good advice... I watched one a while back and responded to the thread that the video would be a great tool for a co driver clinic. Petes guy is good!
 

chase for food

Well-Known Member
a good codriver should be both a good navigator and have extensive knowledge of the car he is in.he must be able to fix anything or rig something to get it to the next pit,as anybody can tell you this is a team sport.
 

JEFFRPM

Non Sugar Coated
Co dog needs to prep the car and know every nut & bolt most of the time the driver has know Idea where the jack is.:eek:
 

PALAPABOY

Bajalite Win Streak Killer
Oh, come on!!! If you don't call it, I don't see it.:D

I definately know the difference between a great codriver and just a body in the seat. A great codriver keeps the driver informed of everything and keeps his ego in check. There have been many times Jon has saved my ass in a race by keeping me calm. There are a few cars out there that should thank him, he saved thier car.:D A codriver should be the cheerleader. Let the driver know when he's doing good and pep him up when he's suckin hind teet.
I heard he had a great teacher back in the day, just don't let him pick up your alternator!!
 

WastedWages

Well-Known Member
I heard he had a great teacher back in the day, just don't let him pick up your alternator!!
That I did , and easy on the alternator dig , I changed my story. I was fighting off the Lakers cheerleader and , Ok know one is going to believe that. My arm will heel and be race ready again in no time. LOL Thanks buddy !
 
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