coil binding

DANKFAB

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I have my King coilovers in front adjusted so that at ride height it compresses the shock almost to coil bind for the top spring( maybe 6 inches of up travel) cause I want it to sit low and wide. Will that make it ride stiff once the top coil spring begins to bind?? While driving around town I noticed that as I hit the larger dips in the road/RR tracks, the suspension suddenly gets very stiff when before it felt plush and I can feel the bump stop coming into play, but the ride changes dramatically after sound coming from the spring makes this "thud". At first I thought it could be the bump stop being too stiff, but I looked and it does compress half stroke just driving around town. Could this be from the springs not being adjusted tight enough, in otherwords is the front too soft? Do I need to put more preload tension on the coilover springs to make a slightly higher ride height and less chance of binding on street driving? but still ok to go bomb the whoops. Am I paranoid?
 

fishd00d

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If you are using half the bump stop driving around town its way to soft!!
 

Kbach66

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If the coil is almost in coil bind in a static state (sitting in the driveway) then it's too soft. More or less preload doesn't change the spring rate, only the "sag height" or ride height.
 

martininsocal

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Sounds like your spring rate is way too soft. While it looks cool lower, it sounds like you are running out of compression space on the street bottoming out the coil on dips! if you are using half the air bump while cruising the pavement, while it may seem cadillac, it will be busted in the dirt. I would look at several things, like shaft location at ride height, actual bump stop compression at full suspension compression, etc...maybe you will get lucky and just need to go up 50 pounds on the initial coil.
 

Cactus_Boy

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One thing you need to take into account is that when your top coil binds your effective spring rate will suddenly jump. Here is how... For example if you are running a 250/250 spring your effective rate is 125. When you bind the top spring, the rate immediately becomes 250 because the top spring is taken out of the equation.

If you are using the top spring as a tender spring that is supposed to bind and make the second spring work by itself, then you may just need to preload the spring a little more. If it is not set up that way then some new spring rates are in order.

Just my .02
 

michael_loomis

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i dont understand why his coils would be binding period if there the right size ? ive seen (felt) plenty of coilovers COMPLETELY compressed without any coil bind regardless of droop . why would they bind if they were fully compressed with not much preload ?
 

cleartoy

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Are your top springs way shorter than the bottoms?

What size shock? What length and poundage springs?
 

billymanfroy

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Just a guess, but where do you have the threaded spring stop set? (Not the top nut that controls ride height, the two slotted ones inside the coil) You probably want to run those down until it catches your upper spring just before your suspension hits the bump stop. Obviously, this will also stop the coil binding and get you on the stiffer bottom spring sooner. You can experiment with slowing down the up travel earlier this way which gives the valving and springs more time (up travel) before you bottom all the way out. If you're close on springs and valving, this can make a huge difference.

Good luck.

Billy
 

DANKFAB

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Well, I have the shocks mounted correctly(thanks sweet devil) and the coil rates are 500/500, so one isn't significantly larger than the other they are the same size. That would explain why its so stiff when the first coil binds since the rate is 500! I do not have any spring stops because its a 10 inch coilover, so I cannot adjust that. I thought the preload being set tighter would help keep the coil from being so soft that it bottoms on the street, but if I get new rates for the top coils I was wondering can the upper spring be a heavier rate than the lower?? I understood it correct to have the secondary coil as the heavier rate or the same as the initial coil. So if I change the uppers, I have to change lower coils as well? The bumps feel good, but not on the street after the coil binds!! BAM BAM!!!
 

CRAIG_HALL

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Any body else confused? How long are your coils top and bottom? If your spring rates are the same how does one bind noticibly first .And you dont have a secondary adjuster? If you know the length of the coils you can get the compressed lengths from an EIBACH book.Isn't 500 & 500 =1000 divided by two =to 500 lb initial rate, bind the upper and your still at 500 for each wheel.
 

michael_loomis

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like i said , i dont understand how his coils can be binding , lol and theres no reason for even touching the secondary adjuster with those rates.

DANK , where do u know what the secondary adjuster is ? its not way down is it ? from what other people run on there trucks here , 500/500 doesnt seem that bad ....too stiff for my taste but not harsh enough to simulate coil binding i wouldnt think. maybe its just the geometry of your suspension VS your shock angle ?
 

DANKFAB

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Its not my geomtery and its the rates Brett King Gave me for this application, and travel. I have 400/450 on a 12 inch King in the rear and its soft, so with more weight up front due to engine and cab, a 500/500 seemed logical to me, but I can see at ride height the initial coil is, for lack of better terms, squished to the point where I can barely see through the coils, and there is 4 inches or less of shock shaft showing. It has to be binding, and the shocks do not have a secondary adjuster, they didn't come on my 10 inch. My 12's in back do have the secondary adjuster. I am gonna put more preload on the spring and see how it does but is this gonna ride like crap in the whoops or jumping? It really makes a hard thud, just on street dips.
 

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DANKFAB

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I wish I could but theres no room and no $$$$$$$$$!! The 4 link is getting bypasses when I save up enough and get out of debt
Seriously though, how can I fix this without having to buy new spring rates. If I get King to send me some secondary adjusters will that solve it??? I don't see how.
 

cleartoy

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How much do you have to compress your shocks to fit the mounting bolts through the eyes of the shock??
 

Ryan B

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I'm really not sure but if you run the same spring rate on your upper and lower springs wouldn't it be the same as just running a single spring with a rate equal to the upper and lower springs? fill me in thanks
 

Driftin

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Did you run the suspension thru its travel without springs on to see if the shock bottoms?
 

1992f150

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<<I'm really not sure but if you run the same spring rate on your upper and lower springs wouldn't it be the same as just running a single spring with a rate equal to the upper and lower springs? fill me in thanks >>

No, the way I understand it, the length of the spring also needs to be factored in. Thats why when low riders cut their springs you see them bouncing along the freeway, they just jacked their spring rate up by shortening the stock spring. Shorter spring harder to compress, longer spring easier to compress.
 
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