Cryo'ing

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I just gave your father (Roger Young) two Ring and Pinion sets and a Spool. I was your dad’s first Off-road racing customer, over three years ago when you first moved here. Cryo Science has Cryo’ed parts for several trucks that I have been involved with since then. As I was just telling Roger, it is hard to quantify exactly what Cryo’ing has done for our racing efforts. We know it helps, that’s why we keep doing it, and we have just had so few parts fail… It is in a non-racing application that Cryo’ing has really convinced me. My ’90 Blazer used to go through front brake pads every 6 month and would destroy the rotors in the same time. Part of it is my driving style, I always late brake, always the racer. Part of it is the weight of a full sized Blazer and running 37” Goodyear GSA’s on it. Anyway, after we Cryo’ed the new rotors and pads almost two years ago I’ve put more than 30,000 miles on them. I used to “heat check” the rotors and get lots of brake pedal shutter after only a few thousand miles. Even after all the miles on the Cryo’ed rotors they show no wear or “heat checking” and there is no pedal shutter. It will be interesting to see how Cryo’ing the 8.8 ring and pinion on the Stock Full Size Truck helps one of the weakest parts of the truck. Thanks for all your help.
 

billymanfroy

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We had talked about doing our aluminum Esslinger head after we burned up the motor at Yerington last year. I don't know how hot it got, but it went off the guage and softened up the aluminum to the point that torquing the head pressed rings around the chambers from the ring on the head gasket. We heat treated it twice, and it helped, so we didn't do it. Would it fix it?!?

Billy
 

Cryo_Science

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Cryo'ing would definetly improve the situation with the head. It's also recommended that if you're going to do any massaging of the metal (i.e. heat treating) to change the hardness of the metal. You should do that before cryo'ing, becuase cryo'ing is not intended to change the hardness, it keeps the hardness very near to what it was. However it cleans up the molecular structure and in doing so, typically strengthens the metal
30% - 50% and it becomes a excellent dissapater of heat which helps engines to run cooler and can prevent warping of heads.
It's better in all cases to cryo before you have problems , than after as this process will in most cases prevent the failure and the expense to correct the failure.I hope that answers your question.if not let me know.


Preston Young
Vice President
Cryo Science
Preston@cryoscience.com
(760) 532-3077
 

Matt

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What temperature to you chill the metal down to, to consider it 'Cryo-ing? How is the process completed? Thanks
 

ACID_RAIN28

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I guess this would be a good time to ask this question, I thought that if you freeze something it expands the material, coming from the egyptians who would pour water in the cracks of rocks, it would freeze at night and split the chunk rock off in the quarry, but when we assymble the spindles, the pins are frozen to shrink it and the spindle is heated to 450 and then the two are pressed togather.
However, heat shrinks material too, like if I make a swing arm or a pair of a-arms and I need to close or open the distance between the chassis mounting points, I can heat the out-side and it will shrink and move???

Can you straighten me out here or fill me in on what I am missing?



"Everything you do is triggered by an emotion of either desire or fear."
 

hoeker

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water is the only substance on the globe that expands as it cools, but this is also only below freezing, above 0 deg C it behaves like every thing else. imagine what our oceans would be like if water continued to contract when it froze, all the ice would go to the bottom and stay there!

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Kritter

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Linear Expansion is directly proportional to temp...except for H20

Kris
<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.barneysprecision.com/fabproducts.htm> Fab Parts</A>
 

drtdevil93

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rubber shrinks with heat.

water shrinks when cooled, and expands with heat. water in its frozen state (ice) expands when cooled. maybe this is clearer: water will shrink when cooled to a certain point, then begins to expand.

erik
 

ACID_RAIN28

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ok i see now it was the water that had me all discombobulated.

"Everything you do is triggered by an emotion of either desire or fear."
 

hoeker

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i think i was incorrect on the temp, water starts expanding as it cools at 4 deg C.

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Some are born great, some achieve greatness,
and some have greatness thrust upon them.
 

ntsqd

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I'm glad you all were awake during that class, cause I must not have been.....

TS

I used to swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

Cryo_Science

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Well cryogenic treatment, when its at -300 degree's the part does contract thereby forcing the molecules to fit into a smaller area and this causes them to organize themselves. Normally we heat the small end of the rod to press the wrist pin in, but yes heating does cause the metal to expand and cooling does cause metal to contract. Water is the only thing that expands when it heats up and expands when it freeze's. Just out of curiousity, how'd the egyptian's freeze the water? they didn't have liquid nitrogen like we do.haha. Let me know if that helps you out any.

Preston Young
Vice President
Cryo Science
Preston@cryoscience.com
(760) 532-3077
 

ACID_RAIN28

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that helps alot. Our spindles are for quads, the pin is steel and the spindle is aluminum, once they are put togather they cannot be seperated, and they are small parts, freeze the pin and heat the aluminum.

as for the egyptians, it was something I saw on the Discoverychannel a long time ago so I don't know if I remember it correctly, but I recall they said that water was porred in cracks and at night the water expanded and the rock was seperated.

"Everything you do is triggered by an emotion of either desire or fear."
 

ACID_RAIN28

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I am the Fabricator at Leager's Inc, like camburg for quads, we build everything from racing chassis and components to hill shoters, and weekend warriors. Mark (laeger) makes his own spindle setup that resembles the vertically mounted uniballs found on some desert trucks, and on camburgs ranger kit, however it is far more advanced and functional. they have the main spindle body with Tee pin that runs down the middle and connects to the pin at the bottom allowing 360deg of movement, I can't say how they are put togather for reason being, let just say that our competitors have purchased them just to cut them up and find out how and they still don't know!! they are heat treated and then zinced, polished etc, he does want them to be harder but he hasn't found a way yet, but he has not explored cryo yet. Are there size limits to cryo if not have you done a whole chassis yet? I go trhough pads on my LT500 like they are water in the sahara. Haven't had a chain problem yet.

"Everything you do is triggered by an emotion of either desire or fear."
 

Cryo_Science

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Well whats the height, length and width of the quad chassis? Our largest tank for cryo'ing is 7ft. long 30in. deep and 30 in. wide. We're in the process of designing larger tanks. However we also need to design and build an adequate heat treatment processing chamber to house these larger assemblies that customers are asking us to do, like your quad chassis.

For your brake pads and rotors, typical results are between 2-3 times the life with our process and they run about 100 degrees cooler.

Preston Young
Vice President
Cryo Science
Preston@cryoscience.com
(760) 532-3077
 

CanyonMan

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How much does something like cryo'ing pads and rotors cost? I eat them up on my 97 GMC K1500 and am also interested in the process for my street cars. I have a buddy with a full size 4x4 Blazer and he eats pads and rotors also. I may be able to gather up several people's parts for cryo'ing if the price is right.

Lyrch
 

John Bitting

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I asked him the other day it was real cheap considering Ramsey has gone 30k miles now on the same set..
price to treat rotors is $25 per rotor, and for pads it's $20 for a set
 
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