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Dana 44 front axle

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Believe it or not, a major source of the ears getting broken is the U-joint caps spinning. When they spin they spit out the clips. From there it's only a matter of time to you have total failure. Tack weld the cups to the yoke.
 

Crusty Shellback

Well-Known Member
I had machined the ears and put full clips in so that they wouldn't be spit out.
Still broke the ears.
 

Crusty Shellback

Well-Known Member
Nope, did about 5 donuts and heard the banging. Stopped and put it in 2wd and unlocked the hubs. On the way out of the beach, dropped it in 4wd and heard the noise so went back to 2wd to drive the 2 miles back to the beach house. Then saw the carnage.
 

Crusty Shellback

Well-Known Member
Pulled the U joint out of the inner axle today. Full clips were still there. But the ears are bent in some which made it a bit hard to get the clips out.
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PaulW

Well-Known Member
The Trutrac was specifically designed for front solid axles. Yes its a limited slip which is good or at least OK for a front. An advantage of the limited slip is it is friendly to stock axles.
ARB sure is a winner, but is not friendly to stock axles, especially on a heavy rig like a Blazer. Going with an ARB alloy forged axles are probably a must. On my latest rig - D44, Superior triple heat treat forged axles with the ARB. Superior is gone and now the go source is Revolution. Having said that spend more dollars and RCV axles are made of 300M and are even stronger than any others.
BTW, my stock axles looked like yours, then I upgraded to alloy axles. No more issues.
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
The Trutrac was specifically designed for front solid axles. Yes its a limited slip which is good or at least OK for a front. An advantage of the limited slip is it is friendly to stock axles.
ARB sure is a winner, but is not friendly to stock axles, especially on a heavy rig like a Blazer. Going with an ARB alloy forged axles are probably a must. On my latest rig - D44, Superior triple heat treat forged axles with the ARB. Superior is gone and now the go source is Revolution. Having said that spend more dollars and RCV axles are made of 300M and are even stronger than any others.
BTW, my stock axles looked like yours, then I upgraded to alloy axles. No more issues.
my recolection clutch type ls diff are tuneable, stiffer or weaker cup spring, or double up either or drive/ driven plate and u can get it close.i did these tricks in i.t. road racing diffs.and use shaefer oil.
 

gwizz

Well-Known Member
not much you can do its just to tiny of a u joint for power or bigger than 33's/35s

you could go cromo, but you will probably break ring and pinions.

a guy named karl janatz makes a kit that puts dana 50 gears in a d44, also a kit that puts the new jku d44 gears in it as well.
jana50 is what its called.

dont even think about rock crawling it lol. honestly i would say throw an open in there. even a true track should be mellow enough to not break that like that.. so it looks like your SOL on that aspect. that being said i have broken one ton stuff in the sand. sand is tricky, has slip till it doesnt. plus its way easy to get more than half of your tire tread engaged which equates into alot of resistance.
 

Crusty Shellback

Well-Known Member
When I get a chance, I'll look into a open diff or true track.
I just bought a Quad near the end of last year, so that make take care of my sand dune issues/fix. :p
So with the quad now in the stable, the Blazer may become the Baja trail rig.
 

isdtbower

Well-Known Member
I have run a sand Jeep for years. Our group use clutch style possies or true tracks. There is no need for a locker in the sand. If needed a little brake will stop the spinning wheel and get the other one going.

It is also the u-joints breaking. Turning the wheel drops the u-joint strength and the "loping" of the joint increases with angle. This vibration of speed- up speed-down is probably breaking your joint or cap first. There are no traces of the shafts contacting each other so you are not over-turning the knuckle. That is not a huge u joint...and usually the failure point especially in a turning situation. I would expect a RCV CV system to be a lot stronger in that spot and also allow a stronger axle shaft. But $$$.

Best to use the HP when pointed straight ahead. Learned that also.
 

Bert is my name

Well-Known Member
Check out almost alloy u joint retainers. Basically a weld on cap to retain the u joint caps and reinforce the ears on the shaft. Iron rock off road produces them. I think a piece of cold roll flat bar would do the same thing though.
 
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