wrightracing.net

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Getting 30" of wheel travel out of the rear or a 4 link is not that expensive in the rear, around 20k-25k or more depending on shocks and axle combo if you have someone do it for you. Cheaper if you do it yourself.

The issue that drives up the cost of the truck is the Snowball affect, it gets bigger and bigger. You then want to add a full cage, then front suspension, then you want to go faster, so you get a bigger motor, then the transmission needs to be upgraded to handle the extra power, then you realize you have to go back and now upgrade those axles because the more Horse power is to much for them to handle and that is how you end up spending so much money. And after all that, you realize you did it wrong or you crash the truck and have to build it all over again

So this is the hobby you are getting in. Be realistic on what you can afford, do a little at a time, but enough so you can still use the truck and have fun. It is a bummer when it sits in project mode in the garage for year's unable to be driven.

Good luck.
 

jon coleman

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yes^, may as well break what you got while you learn how to drive dezert terrain, work your way up the ladder of broken parts, so when you get to the 20 plus inches of travel, you'll know hopefully what to do& NOT do going fa$t😲
 

43mod

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Buy a house . It will pay fir a truck . Truck is probably going to prevent you from having a house damn near forever .
If dead set buy a built up used ranger and have fun .
 

HartLessPerf

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Just always remember this...

You can sleep in your truck, but you can't race your house.

Yeah but it's way better to be able to sleep in your house AND race your truck. Haha.

So they sky is the limit when it comes to building, and after doing some builds without really setting a budget I can honestly say it's bitten me in the ass and ended up costing more. Set yourself some goal for the truck, then go through all the options and really think about the things you actually need vs the things you want; often times people will buy more than they really need for their application. Things like if you really need a 3.0 coilover/4.5 bypass like full on race trucks, or if a 2.5 coilover/3.0 bypass or even just coilover will realistically handle what you want it to do. That decision right there can save you five figures when purchasing parts. Same as the rear axle - do you need a new fabricated 9" housing or would a $100 14 bolt do the trick?

If you really want to stretch your dollar, start researching suspension design and learn to crunch the numbers. If you build it yourself, your first couple designs probably won't come out as you exactly wanted, so learning/practicing before pulling the trigger saves you time/money later on. If you're really ambitious, grab some free CAD software like Fusion 360 and learn to draw out/test everything digitally before cutting steel or ordering parts.

If that's all a bit further than you want to go for now, just find the style of truck you really like and pimp it out with some bolt on/light modification stuff from reputable builders. This way you could have some fun building, but you also won't spend years getting to the point of actually having fun with the truck. From there you can learn your driving style, what you do and don't like about it, and how to improve it.

I'll also echo the mention of investing your money into something that will make you money first. Take it as you will, but I'm one of those guys who wishes he did that instead of building my race program first. I would have been way further ahead/more stable financially, and I'd be able to afford bigger and better parts. Instead I run my race program off used parts, and my Silverado prerunner build is sitting in the corner collecting lots of dust and only a handful of parts haha. One day I'll drive it...
 
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Wow, I just got back to Vegas from Montana spending time with my mother before I start working again. So I'm kinda got my mindset on a Raptor conversion. my mom works at a used car dealer in Montana and they have a 2010 Ford F150 CrewCab that would make a nice Raptor I think. I could get it cheap since she works there, so I might wanna use that. For the parts... due to the stupid Virus, I can't go to the Shop and actually plan stuff out. The Digital software you told me about is something that I'm really interested in. I can get the Graphic Design Majors to help me out with this, and it will help us kids in Auto build and fabricate the truck. Now looking back I see what you mean by start small and work up because I'm gonna break parts, and I need to learn to desert run. So picture this, I got this 2010 Ford F150 Crew Cab, I buy a one-piece fabricated SVT Raptor front end with enlarged wheel wells and Raptor Bedsides with enlarged wheel wells. What is the most essential/advised upgrade I should get done to this set up to take on the Mojave? Suspension? Coilovers? Rollcage? Wheels? Power? Chassis? Frame? Axle (RWD vs AWD)?
 

HartLessPerf

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I'd start with suspension. A good setup suspension can make or break a vehicle. Stock truck suspension doesn't remotely cut it haha. Companies like Baja Kits and Dirt King make different levels of kits that you should take a look at to get inspiration or consider.

Baja Kits:

Dirt King:

Both have options to address the rear as well. There are other options out there as well - I just know these names, but have no experience with any of them (as I build my own stuff).

4x4/AWD/RWD kinda depends on your preference. RWD is the most popular in the desert, but with the advancements in 4x4 it's gaining traction. I would personally go 4x4, but I also daily drive all my trucks, and being in Canada most of the time we spend half the year covered in snow so 4x4 is essential for that alone.

My next steps would be safety. As you get more comfortable, you'll probably drive faster and take more risk. If you're getting serious about running hard, a cage and proper seats/harnesses are critical incase you eat a bump or something bad. It'll stiffen up the chassis as well if you tie the cage in front to rear. After that I would address the rest, and this is where it'll start nickle and diming you. Add bigger wheels - put more stress on driveline/steering components. Add more power - put more stress on driveline components. Etc, etc.
 
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Alright, thanks for the help everyone. I think I'm planning to do a Raptor Conversion of the 2009 F150, buy suspension then tires. After tires, slowly build up a roll cage and add safety equipment. After safety, build driveline enforcement, while slowly adding power, keeping things equal. I'm not really looking for the truck to be pushing over 300/400 hp to tell me I'm about 21, but we will see. You never know with car people and the kids in the auto shop at school. lmao.
 

dirtdoc

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I'm no expert, but I think you should seriously consider a TTB ford bronco. TTB (twin traction beam) broncos were produced from 1980 to 1996. Most came with either 5.0 or 5.8 l v8. The suspension and engines are very strong from the factory. With a few simple suspension upgrades, like extended radius arms and a shock upgrade you can be out in the desert having tons of fun with your friends. You can move on to bigger (more expensive) mods like coilovers, cage and a 4 link as your budget and time permits.
 

dirtdoc

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wrightracing.net

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I'm no expert, but I think you should seriously consider a TTB ford bronco. TTB (twin traction beam) broncos were produced from 1980 to 1996. Most came with either 5.0 or 5.8 l v8. The suspension and engines are very strong from the factory. With a few simple suspension upgrades, like extended radius arms and a shock upgrade you can be out in the desert having tons of fun with your friends. You can move on to bigger (more expensive) mods like coilovers, cage and a 4 link as your budget and time permits.
I am a second on the Bronco. I got my 1986 Bronco as my Daily driver in 1992. I was able to play with it in the dunes and Baja right off the bat with just a Rancho 3 in lift and 33x12.50 BFG all terrain ta tires. That was it and a stock 302 engine back then.

Over time I upgraded part's, did Autofab fiberglass, Bilstein shocks, then Fox coilovers. Rollcage and suspension upgrades. 35" tires, Fox bump stops and limiter straps.

Now a Stroker motor and a new body to go old school look with the high performance long travel TTB suspension.

The Bronco or F150 1980 to 1996 is the best starter that can grow as you do. A $3000 investment can get you started, then you can take it as far as you want. I have had mine for 29 years and have no plans to ever get rid of it, it is just to fun to drive. And now for my 50th Birthday, I picked up a 1972 Bronco Body to stretch and widen, then mount it on the 1986 chassis. The best of both worlds, old school style and high performance TTB

I am a bigger guy, so a Full-size Long travel Early Bronco is just what I have always wanted.

This was back in the mid 1990's with the Rancho 3" lift and 33" tires. Then with the Autofab fiberglass and then the 72 Bronco Body that is going on this year.

My project is just one example of how far you can take a Bronco.

Good luck
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