Dialing in bypass shocks

singlehanded

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I have some king 2 tube bypass shocks in the rear and they are set just as they came from king. I raced at d-day and from some junping pictures it looks like I not getting very much down travel. I'm new to adjusting bypass shocks any tips or how they work would be awsome so I can get them all dialed in.

midnight landscaper working overtime and I'm full throttle I'm full throttle tonight
 

Kritter

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Check rebound adjuster. Also a common problem is that when the leafs get installed they are overtightened and not allowed to move like they should (hence the slow dropout speed) and also it wears out the bushings faster too. Check that first.

Kris
"I was thinking the exact same thing about you..."
 

singlehanded

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I think the leaf bolts were a little to tight. I think I might go to elsinore or buemont and play with the adjusters today.

midnight landscaper working overtime and I'm full throttle I'm full throttle tonight
 

Kritter

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I wanted to clear my comment up a bit...I was not talking about the u bolts!! Keep those tight. I was jsut referring to the shackle/leaf and shackle/hangar bolts.

Kris
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blind655

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How tight should they be?

A suburban might not be as good as a truck, but it comes damn close with 8 people in it
 

Kritter

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Use a stover nut and loctite and tighten them to wear it is hard to move the spring and then back off a bit till it is easier. With a stover, it is hard to give a torque estimate...you just know when it is right.

Kris
"I was thinking the exact same thing about you..."
 

singlehanded

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Ya I know you werent talking about the u-bolts

midnight landscaper working overtime and I'm full throttle I'm full throttle tonight
 

J_Dog

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Singlehanded,
By loosening the rebound (backing out the adjuster) it will allow the shock to rebound quicker. Be careful about doing this. Too much rebound in the rear will make the truck's rear to kick up too much. Call King Shocks they are very willing to assist you over the phone and give you tips. They will tell you not to be afraid to experiment with the adjustments, just keep track of them so you can get it back to original if need be. King Shocks suggests changing them up to 2 full turns (max.) of the adjuster at a time for testing, then you can fine tune them as needed. Even though you did not get much down travel, were you bottoming out? If, so tighten the compression on the shock.

Jeff Matlock
CODE 3 Motorsports
Class 7s Ford Ranger - VORRA
 

Dylan

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the best way to do your spring pivots is to have an inner sleve that the bushings pivot on and fully tighten the bolts down on the sleeve. some shackles have a stepped bolt that the side plate tightens down onto (Toyota)
often times trucks get set up with to low a spring rate to make the wheel drop out even with low rebound damping. just because the wheel is in the air doesn't meen it wants to go down. because of its large unsprung mass and the fact that it just hit a bump it may still be on an upward trajectory??? spring rate and a reasonable sprung vs. unsrung mass ratio can force the wheel down in contact with the ground.
 

FABRICATOR

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Re: "just because the wheel is in the air doesn't meen it wants to go down. because of its large unsprung mass and the fact that it just hit a bump it may still be on an upward trajectory???"

Good point. Makes you wonder about some of the buggies and small trucks running 35" and even 37" Projects...

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 
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