Electric chase vehicles

michael.gonzalez

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Pretty funny Mg .Two hours ago the technology to reuse water for Hydro did not exist. Good job discovering it.
Huh? Reuse water for hydro? What are you even saying?

And does it pertain to electric chase trucks? or is it just you whining about something unrelated that you don't even understand?
 

Klaus

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Not directly related to E chase trucks….

The ultimate source of all energy is the sun.

Fossile fuel is said to be stuff previous on the surface compressed deep below the surface. Something like that.

Coal and wood burning. Those trees needed the sun to grow.

Wind, solar its obvious. Hydro is realy just gravity harvesting. Once the water ends up in the oceans it evaporates by the sun and rains down to higher elevated places.

No wonder religions used to and still today (covertly) celebrate it. Say hello to the december sun solstice event or sun helios behind deity figures and many contemporary symbols all around us.

Fun thread. Sorry to further fork it away from chase trucks gone electric.
 
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Bricoop

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Not directly related to E chase trucks….

The ultimate source of all energy is the sun.

Fossile fuel is said to be stuff previous on the surface compressed deep below the surface. Something like that.

Coal and wood burning. Those trees needed the sun to grow.

Wind, solar its obvious. Hydro is realy just gravity harvesting. Once the water ends up in the oceans it evaporates by the sun and rains down to higher elevated places.

No wonder religions used to and still today (covertly) celebrate it. Say hello to the december sun solstice event or sun helios behind deity figures and many contemporary symbols all around us.

Fun thread. Sorry to further fork it away from chase trucks gone electric.
don’t forget about tidal energy, that’s mostly the moon’s doing.

Whatever algorithm put us here, also gave us all the ingrediants we need to be sustainable.
 

Klaus

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don’t forget about tidal energy, that’s mostly the moon’s doing.

Whatever algorithm put us here, also gave us all the ingrediants we need to be sustainable.
Yes I love it....the moon. And yes... everything we need to sustain ourselves is right here in front of us in abundance.

However isn't it just a reflector of the sun rays? Then again there are people on the interwebs that claim it is its own light source.
 

Tube ride

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D2B3F546-E3ED-410B-BAA2-11108A2938D7.jpegThis is fine.
 
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Bricoop

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So back to electric chase trucks.

Clearly the issue is the range. Filling up 200 miles takes 15 minutes on a supercharger, but clearly there aren’t enough(any) of those along the course. So now you’re relying on your generator that is there to power your welder(and now your truck). The home charger will charge 44 miles/hour. Good luck trying to mimic that off a generator. The technology is just not there yet.

Off topic:
As for other uses, it makes a lot of sense. Two of Electric’s largest advantages over gas are it makes monster amounts of torque and doesn’t burn energy when idling/coasting. It makes great sense for delivery trucks. It even makes sense for semis (regenerative braking reduces brake wear and heat). Think of a company like Walmart. They have trucks running back and forth from distribution networks all day. If they converted their loading docks to have “super chargers” they’d have substantial fuel cost savings.

Did you know over 50% of our energy is lost before it makes it to the end user due to transmission inefficiencies? The US grid needs major work before it can accommodate the laws put in place. There are so many reasons the approach is flawed, but that doesn’t mean we should discount the potential of the technology. I bet we see a hybrid TT in <5 years.

Kinda back on topic:
The Dakar Audi is powered from two tiny electric motors that output 335 hp each and an onboard generator made out of a 2.0 turbo DTM engine. It’s super efficient because it can just sit there at the optimal rpm while the batteries absorb the power demand changes (like our sweet Lake Mead). All while being at max torque whenever asked for.

The electric motors weigh 77 lbs each. Not to mention They could run the Baja 500 without stopping. The Dakar Audi has a 79 gallon fuel tank and double the range of a 100G TT. And the instant torque can’t be overstated. It also has a push to pass function increasing output briefly.

It’d be really interesting to see someone make a TT with one of those motors on each corner. That truck would be the fastest truck, hands down. You don’t run a drive shaft so you can put center of gravity low and in the middle of the truck improving, everything. Do I think this will happen? No

But what I do expect to happen some day is someone to try and run their Cybertruck in a race and that’s gonna be awesome for all of us to watch.
 
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johndjmix

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Some really good posts here with a lot of info. I like the comment "The ultimate source of energy is the sun". So right. We just need to learn how to harvest it better.

Eliminating parts is what i really like. Eliminating a standard gas motor and all the parts associated gets rid of a lot of stuff to break. We all know, in desert racing, the most important thing...more than power, and even suspension, its reliability.

--John
 

BCarr

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The only teams wealthy enough to even attempt this with the current line up of available EV's won't.

What do you do when your EV trucks computer goes ape isht and you have to call customer service to reboot it for you while you're in the middle of the desert with no service? I know this happens with Teslas quite often. You can work on a truck with diesel or gas motor, you can't do crap on an EV truck if you break down and its computer/software related.

They're completely irrelevant as of today. Even the fastest TT at the Baja 250 that finishes in 4-5hours has no use for one, let alone any class after that.
Regarding emerging BEV electrical architecture, in general, the topology is centered around a HPC (high performance computer with a "gigabyte" software footprint), and can be a single component that centralizes control processing. This can be considered almost opposite of today's vehicle electrical architectures which employ distributed ECU topology (using a "megabyte" software footprint), where each ECU supplies its own sub-system control processing and are multiplexed together.

So...the second paragraph above can be a concern where HPC reliability should be addressed with proper design methods and robust manufacturing techniques. As they too emerge, Military BEV applications will bolster this technology as well. Still, though, in the severe use cases like ours, reliability can validly remain an open question.
 
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