Extended Half Shafts/2 piece shafts...

01Baja4x4

Well-Known Member
Posts
102
Reaction
0
I have been researching half shafts/CV's for months now. I have yet to come across anyone who has extended the stock shaft of a CV jointed half shaft. Is it even possible? Does the shaft have to be solid or can it be a 2 piece shaft, with some kind of joint in the middle? These are just a couple of the questions I can't seem to find definitive answers too.

I have found a CV joint made by Dephi that uses a type of coil as the shaft but I'm sure those are extremely expensive.

Would it be cheaper to just have complete custom CV jointed half shafts made?

This is for a project that is still a while out but material on this topic is somewhat limited and repetitive. The vehicle this is for is an '01 Ranger 4x4.

-Tim
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Posts
2,429
Reaction
27
The way you extend a halfshaft is you have a new one made to the length required. Cutting & welding an existing is asking for big time trouble. DON'T go there.

Most CV's have some 'plunge', that is some ability to allow for different flange to flange distances as the suspension cycles. Some of the higher end cars are using a CV that has no plunge in it and to allow for the distance change those cars run a two piece halfshaft that has a trick slip-yoke arrangement in it.
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Posts
5,147
Reaction
107
You should be able to take any existing CV shaft, remove the CV's and get a new shaft made to the right length. It's not that expensive when made from "normal" materials.

FYI, the only way to modify an existing OEM type shaft without weakening it is to have the new spline rolled in. This will only work on a shaft that is full size where the new spline needs to be. Most factory splines on axles and CV joints are rolled in, not cut in. This is a forging process very similar to knurling on a lathe. It's fast, accurate, and strong. They can also be formed into shafts without any further machining, and the spline major diameter ends up being larger than the shaft. The chances of finding someone who can roll the particular spline you need for a reasonable price is extremely small.

There are cars that have one half-shaft with a torsional cushion in the middle. The cushion is a metal/rubber unit that is splined to the two short shafts, thus making up a half shaft. I may have a picture of one.

You might take a look at the June issue of 4-Wheel & Off Road magazine. Walker Evans new rock crawler is all independant suspension with sliding shafts and some CV information.
 

01Baja4x4

Well-Known Member
Posts
102
Reaction
0
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
You should be able to take any existing CV shaft, remove the CV's and get a new shaft made to the right length. It's not that expensive when made from "normal" materials.

[/ QUOTE ]

Ok, that sounds like my best option. Do you or anyone know of a shop that will do this? Also, what do you mean by "normal" material? If you happen to have a picture of the 2 piece shaft, I'd like to see it.

-Tim
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Posts
2,429
Reaction
27
'Normal'' material for OE halfshafts is either 1045 or 1144 (""stressproof").
 
Top