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Faro Arm and Laser Scanning

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#1
Not sure if this is the right section and honestly I'm not sure even if anyone has one of these but... By chance, is anyone working with Faro arms or any other similar arms and also using the laser scanning attachments? If so, what are you using arm and software wise? What kind of things are you using it to develop and what's your over all thoughts?

We just had a Faro arm demonstration here in house and have Romer coming next week to do a demo as we're in the market. We currently have a older Romer arm and use it quite a bit but are finding that we're getting into more complex stuff that tactile touch measuring just isn't reasonable for.

Curious if anyone has experience using these and your thoughts and what your uses are for it.

Probably a long shot as I wouldn't imagine many in the offroad world are using them but maybe some of you guys at your day jobs have interactions with them...

Khris
 

louie

Active Member
#2
Khris,
Depends on your use But I have found that a high quality surface scan is often more useful than anything. for this I use guys that have the atos system as it provieds trully accurate surface data. martin at blue point scan is the best. The faro systems for surface scanning really just dont produce data that is true enough to the surface.
Lou
 

JRod

fast-aid.org
#3
Not sure if this is the right section and honestly I'm not sure even if anyone has one of these but... By chance, is anyone working with Faro arms or any other similar arms and also using the laser scanning attachments? If so, what are you using arm and software wise? What kind of things are you using it to develop and what's your over all thoughts?

We just had a Faro arm demonstration here in house and have Romer coming next week to do a demo as we're in the market. We currently have a older Romer arm and use it quite a bit but are finding that we're getting into more complex stuff that tactile touch measuring just isn't reasonable for.

Curious if anyone has experience using these and your thoughts and what your uses are for it.

Probably a long shot as I wouldn't imagine many in the offroad world are using them but maybe some of you guys at your day jobs have interactions with them...

Khris
Some former associates from AZ purchased a Faro system (or very similar) for use in detailed diagramming of serious collisions.

What are you using it for?

I can call them up and ask how the transition from standard GPS plotting and hand measuring is going.

I did sit in on the display and was absolutely blown away by the detail picked up by these laser scanners and how fast they work. The unit we were shown (and ultimately purchased) worked in conjunction with GPS/Satellites to do some amazing things.
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#5
Couple different uses... I work for a company that makes classic mustang reproduction parts and we typically get by just fine with a normal cmm arm that we have. Occasionally some of the body panel surfaces get to be a pain but we deal with it. Lately though we've started getting into stuff like rubber seals around your door edges and stuff like that. We can't really use the tactile touch type of CMM setup cause the parts are too soft to actually touch accurately. We're weighing the pros and cons of buying and owning in house vs. sending out to pay per scan. One part of me thinks if we spend the $70K on one it might just sit quite a bit but another part of me thinks that once we get used to it we might find it really nice and use it a heck of a lot more then we think.

Just curious if others really are finding them pretty useful or more of just a novelty tool that only occasionally gets used.

I could see using it for body panels to get the surface shapes perfect when putting on cool peal and stick items!

I will say, what I saw from Faro yesterday was really impressive! I'd seen the demo's at various trade shows but when they're actually scanning parts related to your industry it really kinda sinks in as how neat and affective it "might" be. "might" being the key word though, I'm just not 100% sold yet.
 
#6
Great thread.

I always wondered if anyone in desert racing used 3D scanning. Like fiberglass body panels, dash boards, etc. Maybe to even make miniature toys of actual race cars.

We have a simple "scantech" 3d scanner. We can mount it on a small cnc (X,Y) for smaller parts or we can mount it to our full size cnc 3d carving machine.

I have been looking at getting a "GOscan" from creaform. It is a handheld white light scanner. Probably just a toy compared to what you guys are talking about.

Tim
 

CRAIG_HALL

Well-Known Member
#7
Khris we have a Romer arm infinite 7.0 i think. We also have a Scanworks Perceptron laser head for it. We use it strictly for reverse engineering. I'm the main user and have honestly only used the Laser head 5-6 times in the past 3-4 years. The touch probing is perfect for 99% of what we (I) do, measure up customers suspension components for us to draw & laser and form. To probe the point i need on a part usually only takes an hour, can be as little as 20 minutes or 2 hrs though. You only create planes,tubes,simple data.. htis takes 5 minutes to convert to a .igs file for CAD import.

To Laser scan a part I'd still probe hard point first then laser. issue with laser is the extra time involved with the software. We use Polyworks and it can take many hours to get the surface scan cleaned, holes filled then convert to a real surface. Very tedious work to edit the laser scan. I've spent 5-6 hours on a simple human head and i have 15 hrs already into a TH400 case that I'm only using for space requirements, I'm never going to make any transmission parts.
I'm not very efficient with Polyworks like the guys who use it all day but it is a factor. The Demo's always make it look easy. I went back for training two years ago because I didn't use it and basically forget everything..Lol
 

vegasloki

Well-Known Member
#8
I have been looking at getting a "GOscan" from creaform. It is a handheld white light scanner. Probably just a toy compared to what you guys are talking about.
I understand the GOscan is $15k or so. Just as with 3D printing/ rapid prototyping, the technology will get less expensive.
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#10
Khris we have a Romer arm infinite 7.0 i think. We also have a Scanworks Perceptron laser head for it. We use it strictly for reverse engineering. I'm the main user and have honestly only used the Laser head 5-6 times in the past 3-4 years. The touch probing is perfect for 99% of what we (I) do, measure up customers suspension components for us to draw & laser and form. To probe the point i need on a part usually only takes an hour, can be as little as 20 minutes or 2 hrs though. You only create planes,tubes,simple data.. htis takes 5 minutes to convert to a .igs file for CAD import.

To Laser scan a part I'd still probe hard point first then laser. issue with laser is the extra time involved with the software. We use Polyworks and it can take many hours to get the surface scan cleaned, holes filled then convert to a real surface. Very tedious work to edit the laser scan. I've spent 5-6 hours on a simple human head and i have 15 hrs already into a TH400 case that I'm only using for space requirements, I'm never going to make any transmission parts.
I'm not very efficient with Polyworks like the guys who use it all day but it is a factor. The Demo's always make it look easy. I went back for training two years ago because I didn't use it and basically forget everything..Lol
Call me a bad thread starter but I kinda forgot about this! LOL

Thanks for the replies everyone! It's appreciated.

I saw Polyworks during the demo we had and after discussing our expected usage they said a program called rapid form might actually be best for our situation. I totally understand on the point and click... I would think if it's a surface, a point, straight lines or a circle using just the probe would definitely still be the fastest way to go. I already currently use it for that type of stuff. Basically I would still continue to use the touch probe for that type of work. We're looking at it for more complex curves found on a body surface, rubber trim pieces that physically move or compress when touched, etc...

I was curious about the post scan touchup work involved. For instance if you have a part sitting on a table that you're going to scan, I'm assuming it picks up the table surface which you have to go back in and delete off the part. Not knowing a lot of details about what you specifically do other then what I've picked up here and there here on RDC it seems like you do a lot of chassis design which would make sense to me being mostly circles, straight lines and flat surfaces. Even reverse engineering I'd think a lot of the fab work is pretty straight forward surfaces for the most part? Things like the TH400 case you mentioned I'm assuming is to put it physically in your cad design and I can see how that would make sense for that.

We're having a romer demo a week from today I believe so it'll be interesting to see what they show. I will say, so far, first impression, the Faro rep sure wants the sale a heck of a lot more then the romer rep which is interesting since we already have an older romer arm.
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#11
Great thread.

I always wondered if anyone in desert racing used 3D scanning. Like fiberglass body panels, dash boards, etc. Maybe to even make miniature toys of actual race cars.

We have a simple "scantech" 3d scanner. We can mount it on a small cnc (X,Y) for smaller parts or we can mount it to our full size cnc 3d carving machine.

I have been looking at getting a "GOscan" from creaform. It is a handheld white light scanner. Probably just a toy compared to what you guys are talking about.

Tim
It just dawned on me... Do you work at water FX over near carter powersports? If so, what's a typical use you guys use the scanner you currently have for? Would you be willing to let me check it out in person by chance? If that's where you work I'm over there about once a week just a few doors down from you cause my friend that does most of my CNC Plasma cutting is in a shop over there and I'm always picking up parts or hanging out BS'ing...
 
#12
http://www.facebook.com/wfxfabrication
It just dawned on me... Do you work at water FX over near carter powersports?


Yes I do.

Water FX started 16 years ago building pools, spas, steam rooms and fire features for Casino Hotel Resorts on the Las Vegas strip.

We now offer many services, Including 5 axis waterjet cutting, 4 axis CNC milling and complete decorative metal fabrication and theming.

We build a lot of Large Scale props with metal armatures to support them.

www.largescaleprops.com

We can 3d scan a model or toy and then re-creare that piece in any size.

We use a laser scanner to get many scans, sometimes 12 to 15 individual scans, then we stitch all those scans together to have a complete water tight model.

Once we re-size the piece in software, we send the information to our CNC 4 axis foam carving system.

Here is a picture of a giant 15 foot pair of headphones we built for iHome at the CES rade show.

www.facebook.com/wfxfabrication
 
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sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#15
We're having a demo I believe of the Artec unit next week. We looked at the romer setup this week. So far it seems like the magic is in the software, not really the scanner or arm itself. That's actually why now we're looking at the artec now as an option because we already own a romer arm with a touch probe so we don't exactly need another one if a hand held scanner alternative is equally as good. Rapidform software if you're a solidworks user sure does look like a good option if it's in your budget!
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
#17
Will let you know what we find out. We're planning to do an online meeting/demo of the unit next week and if it looks like something we may actually spend the money on we'll likely do an in person demo.
 
#18
By chance, is anyone working with Faro arms or any other similar arms and also using the laser scanning attachments? If so, what are you using arm and software wise? What kind of things are you using it to develop and what's your over all thoughts?
Well, I'would recommend you to look at this new Robo arm. It's not been released yet. But me and my team use their scanners and very happy with the quality. They also provides all needed software.
 
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