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First ranger build, I beam questions?

Woodsninja

New Member
Hello, I just acquired an 89 ford ranger. I have previously built a jeepspeed style prerunner jeep, but the Ranger is a prerunner icon and something I have wanted to build for some time. I started looking into long travel kits for ideas, but I want to build it myself. One kit said the I beams are basically stock, but the camber has been adjusted, uses new radius arm brackets, and stock transmission brace. Says it's a 4" lift, can give you 16" wheel travel. So I'm wondering if I can just cut the I beams and weld a wedge spacer in there? I believe there casted, is that something I can weld on? Does anyone know off the top of there heads how much of an angle I would have to change them? Any help or links anyone can suggest is greatly appreciated
 

vegasloki

Well-Known Member
There have been literally thousands of pages written about modding a beamed truck. Use the Google and it will go deep. The Ranger Station and Dezert Rangers have more info than here. I've got a beamed build right now and used this thread as the deep dive point to gaining more knowledge. DIY Bent/Extended Beams. Just a few questions

This isn't something that's going to be easily answered in a forum post or two. You're going to need to do quite a bit of homework and some good old fashioned design.
 

Woodsninja

New Member
Thank you. My jeep has a solid axle, so quite a bit different. I did all the cage work, plating of the uni body, bumpers, suspension and everything myself on it. I'm confident I can do this build, I guess I just need to take that first leap.
 

vegasloki

Well-Known Member
Regardless of one's fab chops there are design issues specific to modding a beam suspension. One place in particular to pay attention is bump steer though the suspension cycle and the camber changes introduced as you lower and widen the beams. So much positive camber and bump steer is introduced it can make the build near undrivable if those factors aren't considered.

If you aren't looking to street your truck you have a bit more latitude but in many cases poor designs can result in bump steer issues that could rip the wheel out of your hand. Many have designed parts and systems where those factors are taken into account and once you start looking around and seeing what others have done you should be able to design/build something to accommodate these factors. You are going to hear from some that you won't be able to get a good alignment on a modded beam truck. If you have a good design and take care with alignment you'll be fine. If you don't you'll burn tires off the truck and have handling issues. The people having issues either have design and/or tuning issues.
 

AZFR8TRAIN

Well-Known Member
So much easier with so many quality kits out there just buy some beams. Fab out your mounts and engine cage.


Sent from my iPhone using race-deZert
 

vegasloki

Well-Known Member
Even if you buy beams you're going to need to make sure your steering geometry is up to the task. There are some of those kits as well. Bump steer isn't unique to off road, we deal with it in circle track and sports cars. In off road the suspension travel is much greater than those other forms and the bump steer has much more pronounced effects.
 
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