from solidworks to real world

westtexasbaja

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I've familiar with marking and bending tubes with my templates and tape measurer but I've never bent a piece drawn in solidworks....

When bending a tube like the attached pic, do you mark the "start" of each bend on a straight piece first and then bend all four?

Or bend, mark, bend, mark.....

What's the best way to transfer dims from drawing to real world.

Thanks.
 

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Zambo

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If you're going to just bend up some simple hoops for a roll cage is the bend tech ez version good enough?
 

atomicjoe23

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+1 for BendTech!!! You can't get an easier to use program for this type of stuff. . .I would just step up to BendTech Pro. . .it's only $250. . .and worth every single penny!!!
 

ZTFab

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If you're going to just bend up some simple hoops for a roll cage is the bend tech ez version good enough?
If you are just doing simple bends then the basic versions will work just fine.

I use the SE version with every single module that Cris offers and it has paid for itself time and time again.
 

atomicjoe23

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Have you used the Pro version before???

How much do you use the added SE features???

Wondering if I should upgrade once I get going a little more???

Thanks!
 

ZTFab

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I've familiar with marking and bending tubes with my templates and tape measurer but I've never bent a piece drawn in solidworks....

When bending a tube like the attached pic, do you mark the "start" of each bend on a straight piece first and then bend all four?

Or bend, mark, bend, mark.....

What's the best way to transfer dims from drawing to real world.

Thanks.
We use Solidworks for all of our parts at ProArmor. The problem when trying to bend tube directly from a SW drawing is that the tangents are set by what ever radius you specify. To achieve the "true" radius of the bent part you have to calibrate the material that you are using to the die on your bender as the material stretches through the bend. If you don't do the calibration then all the tangent locations are only theoretical to the specified radius.

If you have a plotter you can print a 1:1 drawing of the part and and start marking and bending one bend at a time.....mark, bend, mark, bend.....a pain in the butt.

That's how they were bending tube when I started working there...I introduced them to BendTech and it has saved us hours and hours of time and tons of wasted material.

BendTech gives you a flat layout of the tube with the necessary cut length, tangent locations, and bend angles including spring back.

Cris now has a direct plug-in for SW on BendTech but it is a little pricey. The easiest thing to do is just pull the x,y,z coordinates from SW and you can plug them into BT to make the part with the correct calibration. It won't even matter what radius you have specified in SW as the x,y,z will work off of the apex of the bend.

Hope that helps.
 

ZTFab

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Have you used the Pro version before???

How much do you use the added SE features???

Wondering if I should upgrade once I get going a little more???

Thanks!
I've had every version of BT that Cris has made. I started with EZ and worked my way up to PRO, SE, etc...

I use SE on a daily basis. I design most of my parts at work in the assembly mode and utilize the plug-ins to transfer data to the other engineers.

If you are not a manufacturer or building a lot of complex tubular parts then PRO is more than enough software. You probably won't use most of the features that SE offers.
 

westtexasbaja

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We use Solidworks for all of our parts at ProArmor. The problem when trying to bend tube directly from a SW drawing is that the tangents are set by what ever radius you specify. To achieve the "true" radius of the bent part you have to calibrate the material that you are using to the die on your bender as the material stretches through the bend. If you don't do the calibration then all the tangent locations are only theoretical to the specified radius.

If you have a plotter you can print a 1:1 drawing of the part and and start marking and bending one bend at a time.....mark, bend, mark, bend.....a pain in the butt.

That's how they were bending tube when I started working there...I introduced them to BendTech and it has saved us hours and hours of time and tons of wasted material.

BendTech gives you a flat layout of the tube with the necessary cut length, tangent locations, and bend angles including spring back.

Cris now has a direct plug-in for SW on BendTech but it is a little pricey. The easiest thing to do is just pull the x,y,z coordinates from SW and you can plug them into BT to make the part with the correct calibration. It won't even matter what radius you have specified in SW as the x,y,z will work off of the apex of the bend.

Hope that helps.
Thanks for the info! I'll check it out.

Grayson
 

ZTFab

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Thanks for the info! I'll check it out.

Grayson
No problem Grayson....

If you don't want to use Bend Tech and just want to use the Calibration Formula to get the correct material radius I can give that to you.
 

westtexasbaja

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No problem Grayson....

If you don't want to use Bend Tech and just want to use the Calibration Formula to get the correct material radius I can give that to you.
That would be great! What do you need from me?
 

ZTFab

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OOooooohhh....Nice. Being almost 100% German blooded....me likey. :D

.....and they're drinking good beer to boot.
 

atomicjoe23

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Hey ZTFab. . .I know this thread is old, but I was doing a search for SW's stuff and ran into this thread again.

I wanted to ask if you had any tips for working in the assembly mode of the BT software. . .I get confused with how they move stuff around on the different axis. . .I'm used to dealing with AutoCAD and now Solidworks and it seems like the way the parts move around the axis are more user friendly in those programs. . .every time I try to start making assemblies in BT I get all sorts of messed up on trying to get the parts where I want them.

Right now I'm doing all my design work in AutoCAD (slowly converting to SW's as I learn it) and then transferring the information to BT for bending. . .it's like doing the work twice. . .I'd like to get better at working with the assembly part of the BT software.

Thanks!
 

ZTFab

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How are you transferring the data from program to program?

Are you working with line drawing and using the apex of each bend?

Are you using the x,y,z data and manually transferring it?

The major downfall to BT's assembly mode is in the "pasting" of existing parts. It is very difficult, if not impossible, to import a part into the assemble mode and get it oriented to the assembly properly. I have spoken with Cris about this and he admits that it is not a strong point of BT.

Using the Assembly mode is best of you are going to start from scratch and make every part in that mode. You can then transfer the individual parts to the "3D" mode to get the bend data.

If you are using SW, like we do at Pro Armor, then you can model your entire assembly in SW, then manually transfer individual parts to the XYZ template in BT to get the bend data.
 

atomicjoe23

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How are you transferring the data from program to program?

Are you working with line drawing and using the apex of each bend?

Are you using the x,y,z data and manually transferring it?.
Yeah. . .creating line drawings and then using all the measurements to transfer to BT.

The major downfall to BT's assembly mode is in the "pasting" of existing parts. It is very difficult, if not impossible, to import a part into the assemble mode and get it oriented to the assembly properly. I have spoken with Cris about this and he admits that it is not a strong point of BT. .
Yes, this is exactly where I was having problems. . .I couldn't get the parts to orient correctly. . .and once I got the orientation they wouldn't mate correctly.

Using the Assembly mode is best of you are going to start from scratch and make every part in that mode. You can then transfer the individual parts to the "3D" mode to get the bend data..
Thanks for that info. . .I will try it that way instead.

If you are using SW, like we do at Pro Armor, then you can model your entire assembly in SW, then manually transfer individual parts to the XYZ template in BT to get the bend data.
Thanks. . .I'm just getting into SW's.

Thanks very much for answering those question. . .very helpful!
 
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