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Getting the power around a Meyers Manx Tow'd - Start to Finish !

Slippery P

Well-Known Member
#21
Normally we don't do that here in the States...
Actually WE the automotive industry does it all the time, called a Parallel circuit.
 

green787

Well-Known Member
#22
Actually WE the automotive industry does it all the time, called a Parallel circuit.
Yes, it's called daisy chaining... Make sure you bury it deep in the harness and wrap it with plenty of electrical tape, so when it fails it will be more fun to find.....

Seriously, is wire so expensive that "we" can't make home runs from a power rail???
 

BuggyBrad

Well-Known Member
#24
Yes, it's called daisy chaining... Make sure you bury it deep in the harness and wrap it with plenty of electrical tape, so when it fails it will be more fun to find.....

Seriously, is wire so expensive that "we" can't make home runs from a power rail???
So are you suggesting that all the wires are run back to a power rail ?

I would be very interested to hear how you handle you tail lights for example, you have two of them so there is two wires that at some stage will need to become one and be switched and then pick up a dash feed etc. By your theory of using a power rail you would need a separate power rail for every active circuit ???

Not trying to be an ass just trying to see if I am missing something and can learn from what you are saying.

Every production car out there has Butt splices, I have seen them used in every shop I have visited many of which do hi dollar looms. for race industry. Funnily enough I recently had a meeting with a loom production company ( Harnex) and asked them about an alternative to butt splicing and was told that is exactly what they did in their looms which are for military and earth moving companies such as Komatsu etc.

Anyway looking forward to your insight, never to old to learn.
 

Slippery P

Well-Known Member
#25
Yes, it's called daisy chaining... Make sure you bury it deep in the harness and wrap it with plenty of electrical tape, so when it fails it will be more fun to find.....

Seriously, is wire so expensive that "we" can't make home runs from a power rail???
Actually "daisy chaining" as you put it would be a series circuit. :)
The splices are typically found in a "splice Pack" so not very hard to find, and if done properly should never fail.

Wire your car how you want Buggy Brad your the one going to be working on it! Looks good so far.
 

green787

Well-Known Member
#26
So are you suggesting that all the wires are run back to a power rail ?

I would be very interested to hear how you handle you tail lights for example, you have two of them so there is two wires that at some stage will need to become one and be switched and then pick up a dash feed etc. By your theory of using a power rail you would need a separate power rail for every active circuit ???

Not trying to be an ass just trying to see if I am missing something and can learn from what you are saying.

Every production car out there has Butt splices, I have seen them used in every shop I have visited many of which do hi dollar looms. for race industry. Funnily enough I recently had a meeting with a loom production company ( Harnex) and asked them about an alternative to butt splicing and was told that is exactly what they did in their looms which are for military and earth moving companies such as Komatsu etc.

Anyway looking forward to your insight, never to old to learn.
The tail light circuit is the one place I might consider daisy chaining.... Because of electrolysis, corrosion, etc. those little splices buried in the loom are a source of failure.... Then how do you fix it out in the field??? Start unwrapping the electrical tape off the harness??? That's why you would want EVERY connection in a serviceable place on the vehicle.

The picture below is a Chevy Truck that had all of those connections go bad, and the entire harness had to be redone.
Yes, I agree that these are commonly used in the wiring of production cars (to save wire) but the junk yards are full of good cars that have this very problem with their harness.....

If one guage is working, and the rest are not, I would immediately suspect that daisy chain connection....
 

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green787

Well-Known Member
#27
Actually "daisy chaining" as you put it would be a series circuit. :)
The splices are typically found in a "splice Pack" so not very hard to find, and if done properly should never fail.

Wire your car how you want Buggy Brad your the one going to be working on it! Looks good so far.
Daisy chaining simply means that the units further down the line are dependent on the one before it....
 

BuggyBrad

Well-Known Member
#29
Thanks for the feedback and suggestions. I paid Joey a visit at ProWireUSA (http://www.prowireusa.com) he gave me some good ideas as well in regards to using Deustch Connector pins and trim downs.

If my harness fails I am screwed and deserve to walk my ass home with head hung low..... and as for electrical tape I don't use it unless I really get stuck or can't avoid it due to poor planning. All looms are done in DR-25 or similar and sealed with medium dual wall or ResinTech RT-125. All terminals are covered in Dual wall and sealed to stop moisture getting in the ends.

If someone put a cable dog onto my wiring loom I would not be impressed at all.

You drawing doesn't really address what I am talking about as far as common feeds. In a car you will usually have at least 3 wires to join for each indicator, Front, Rear and Dash Light and then that needs a switch feed, so in reality 4 wires need to become one. To do that with out a splice would be interesting to see. It is not as simple as a power or earth buss. Keep in mind this is not an EFI Engine loom, they are done differently

Have you got any pictures of your actual work so I can see what you are talking about ?
 

BuggyBrad

Well-Known Member
#30
Here is one I did last night, funnily enough it is a tow'd as well but no direct relationship to the one I started in this thread. It was TXL and WeatherPaks

 

_

Well-Known Member
#33
Brad, I like the terminal housing on the back of the keyed ignition switch (or does this ignition switch incorporate permanent lead wires.) I can't tell you how many times I have fought with getting individual contacts attached to, and/or stay attached to, ignition switches on hot-rods and street vehicles applications which always tend to be in-accessible. Can you provide a source...?
Thanks.

Also,

FYI, if you don't already know, there are silicone plugs available to plug the individual unused terminal locations in the rear of the Bussman fuse/relay holder. Even though it is out of immediate harms way, river crossing tend to get water in some of the most un-expected locations.
 
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BuggyBrad

Well-Known Member
#34
Brad, I like the terminal housing on the back of the keyed ignition switch (or does this ignition switch incorporate permanent lead wires.) I can't tell you how many times I have fought with getting individual contacts attached to, and/or stay attached to, ignition switches on hot-rods and street vehicles applications which always tend to be in-accessible. Can you provide a source...?
Thanks.

Also,

FYI, if you don't already know, there are silicone plugs available to plug the individual unused terminal locations in the rear of the Bussman fuse/relay holder. Even though it is out of immediate harms way, river crossing tend to get water in some of the most un-expected locations.
The fuse box is now plugged, it was a progress picture but good pick up, I did forget to put the GPS Antenna into the speedo DOH ..

The ignition switch is a Mercury Boat Switch. I buy them from Marine Shops and they are the best switch I have found for purpose. You get them with a weatherpak style connector on but occasionally you get them with a deustch . I will see if I can find you a part number.

They are sealed and even the front has a rubber slit to keep dust and dirt out. There action is super nice as well and every time I use them people comment on how nice they feel.
 

green787

Well-Known Member
#36
BuggyBrad, Your wiring looks good.... I just don't hide or have any type of splices in my harnesses.... The only thing in the harnesses I build are wire... Each circuit should have it's own feed and some need a negative or "return" wire to a ground buss because there is so much fiberglass on the bodies.
Here is a sample of my work where I installed a 50 amp main fuse and a fuse block just for accesories like LED light bars, and radios, DVD player, etc.
 

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BuggyBrad

Well-Known Member
#37
In SOCAL you might get away with wires like that but anywhere with corrosion is going to eat your pre insulated no heat shrunk terminals and allow your copper to break down.

The game changes significantly when you go from adding accessories to wiring complete vehicle with both lighting and engine looms.

Anyway each to their own it is good to see some options of what others do.
 

dirtslinger

Well-Known Member
#38
Things I learned reading this thread.

1. BuggyBrad does pretty nice electrical work for not being a professional wiring guy.
2. ProFormance appears to be very helpful.
3. Do not let Green787 near my race car.
 
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