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How does a remote reservoir shock work?

chevydude7

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if someone would be able to tell me how a remote reservoir shock works in detail. I know roughly how they work but i'm wanting to learn more about them.
 

BRINGTHERUCKUS

Nimrod de PMC
the reservoir holds more oil for less fade, and has a dividing piston that splits the oil and gas. this leads to less cavitation and fade.
 

Random Thoughts Racing

Well-Known Member
A remote reservoir relocates the floating piston and gas charge to a "remote" location via a hose. This allows the damper body to be shorter or to house a longer rod. The additional oil and possible larger gas chamber are only an ancillary benefit of the remote reservoir design.

The function of a remote reservoir is exactly the same as a standard monotube although the hose and gas chamber may change the feel depending on size.
 

Odyknuck

Well-Known Member
The remote resivoir allows more oil to be in the shock to dissapate the heat better increasing time between rebuilds and decreasing fade and foaming. There is very little oil in the resivoir in the extened position, maybe an ounce or 2. As the shock compress, it forces some of the oil into the resivoir. Not as much as much as you think however. keep in mind that there is between 150 to 200 PSI of nitrogen in the resivoir that the oil has to push against.
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
The interior of a shock is a closed system, but as the shaft goes in and out of the body (grrrrrrr!;) ), the available volume in the system changes because the shaft takes up some space.

Since the oil is incompressible, you have to have some gas in there to account for this change in volume. Separating the gas from the oil with a sliding piston keeps the oil from frothing up. But it also makes the shock body very long unless you 'remote' the part that has the piston in it. That's the whole purpose of the reservoir. The amount of oil that flows into the reservoir as the shock compresses is the exact volume of the shock shaft that has entered the damper body. It doesn't matter if you have 100 or 1000 psi of nitrogen preload.

Like Joel said, the extra fluid and cooling ability are an ancillary benefit.
 

ruff ranger

Active Member
not just a more consistent rebound but compression as well. once oil starts cavitating it is exponentially less effective. hot oil thins like water and dampers become less effective. resis dont eliminate this, just help.
 

clogking

Well-Known Member
The interior of a shock is a closed system, but as the shaft goes in and out of the body (grrrrrrr!;) ), the available volume in the system changes because the shaft takes up some space.

Since the oil is incompressible, you have to have some gas in there to account for this change in volume. Separating the gas from the oil with a sliding piston keeps the oil from frothing up. But it also makes the shock body very long unless you 'remote' the part that has the piston in it. That's the whole purpose of the reservoir. The amount of oil that flows into the reservoir as the shock compresses is the exact volume of the shock shaft that has entered the damper body. It doesn't matter if you have 100 or 1000 psi of nitrogen preload.

Like Joel said, the extra fluid and cooling ability are an ancillary benefit.
Zambo has it right on and I will ad just a little more info to think about.
There is the question of where to attach the reservoir. Top or bottom of the shock. The oil that is displaced either has to go threw the piston valving or not if the remote is attached to the cap end of the shock. So it can effect the valving in a minor way.Also the technical term for the sliding piston is IFP (Intermediate floating piston).
Just trying to ad value!

Just noticed some great threads on the bottom of this page. Read those they have great info in them
 

Shamy541

Member
So what is the major difference between a remote res and a piggyback?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
technical term for the sliding piston is IFP (Intermediate floating piston).
Or Internal floating piston or dividing piston...

Top or bottom of the shock. The oil that is displaced either has to go threw the piston valving or not if the remote is attached to the cap end of the shock. So it can effect the valving in a minor way.
Oil goes through piston regardless where the resi is at.
On the bottom, you can run much larger compression damping forces without having to increase resi pressure. The opposite is true for an out the top resi.

With shocks you want to run the smallest shaft diameter possible that will not fail and the least amount of reservoir pressure possible that will not caviate. cavitate to lamens is boiling. its caused by a large differential in pressue..so large it creates a vaccum. Things boil a lot easier in vacum.
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
Am I miss-reading this statement, seems backwards?
No...my head was up my ass...good catch as it is backwards but I cant edit it.

should read

"On the bottom, you can run much larger compression damping forces without having to increase resi pressure. The opposite is true for an out the top resi"

(January 16, 2012 - Edited)
 

chevydude7

Well-Known Member
Thanks so much for everyones help on explaining better how a Remote Reservoir works. I recently got a pair of King 2.5 Rear Shocks for my 08 chevy silverado and I was wondering if someone could tell me how you mount the reservoir. I received these 4 tabs when I bought the truck and I was told to get a bracket for the reservoir. I think he said I could get them at my local hardware store. I have no idea what size bracket I would need either. Heres a picture of the tabs and the shocks. Any help would be great.
 

Attachments

BRINGTHERUCKUS

Nimrod de PMC
weld the tabs to the frame where the resi best fits and isnt under tension, then get 2 hose clamps per side to hold the resi
 
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