hybrid pace car THE END IS HERE

JEFFRPM

Non Sugar Coated
CONCORD, N.C. (AP) -- Denny Hamlin glided a hybrid vehicle down the backstretch at Lowe's Motor Speedway at 110 mph, one hand on the steering wheel and his head turned toward his passenger.

"Pretty smooth ride, huh?" he grinned.

Smooth enough for NASCAR's standards.

A hybrid will be the official pace car for the first time in NASCAR when Toyota lends a Camry for use in next month's Coca-Cola 600. Hamlin offered rides around the speedway Tuesday in the car that will be used to demonstrate its performance capabilities.

"A couple times I found myself just puttering around there because it was so smooth," Hamlin said after almost an hour on the track. "You've almost got to force it to get out of shape."

The demonstration was done a day before Earth Day, which is celebrated Wednesday.

Toyota spent more than a year trying to get its Camry hybrid used as an official pace car, and final approval was contingent on a NASCAR performance test. The car had to hit 100 mph by the time it reached the second turn of Lowe's from a standby position near the pit road exit.

Hamlin estimated he ran laps in the pace car at an average of 105 mph.

The Camry, which will be given away in a promotion after the race, was built at Toyota's facility in Georgetown, Ky. It's a 187-horsepower, 2.4-liter four-cylinder vehicle that gets an EPA estimated combined average of 33 miles per gallon.

Toyota also plans to use a hybrid Camry as the pace car later this year for races at Infineon Raceway, Chicagoland Speedway, Watkins Glen International and Martinsville Speedway
 

atpalmer

Well-Known Member
what's the gas mileage at 110mph??? and just because the eco-terrorists are in love with hybrids doesn't make the hybrid bad.
 

Mumzy

Well-Known Member
Wait until someone is able to adapt a KERS system on an off-road car. Think about haw much energy is wasted over a 500+ mile race. F-1 utilizes the braking power, off-road could power a KERS wheel through the suspension travel.

There you go....make it work, and you could have a ton of torque when you need it.
http://www.motorauthority.com/brake-energy-regeneration-in-f1-by-2009.html

Also, if you placed the flywheel so it spins the right direction you could actually use it to help balance the car. Turbo Diesel power, KERS and a ........I'll save that for later.
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
What amazes me is that it is 2009 and in 1980 we had 30+ mpg cars. All these adds and billboard of "high" mpg are a joke. 60mpg+ is worth advertising about.

http://www.mpgomatic.com/2007/10/08/super-cheap-high-mpg-cars-1978-1981/
In the US alone, there were thousands of electric cars and delivery trucks... in 1910!

Wait until someone is able to adapt a KERS system on an off-road car. Think about haw much energy is wasted over a 500+ mile race. F-1 utilizes the braking power, off-road could power a KERS wheel through the suspension travel.

There you go....make it work, and you could have a ton of torque when you need it.
http://www.motorauthority.com/brake-energy-regeneration-in-f1-by-2009.html

Also, if you placed the flywheel so it spins the right direction you could actually use it to help balance the car. Turbo Diesel power, KERS and a ........I'll save that for later.
Huge amounts of bump energy available. I think I'd start with rebound.

There are electric KERS in F1 too.
 
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In the US alone, there were thousands of electric cars and delivery trucks... in 1910!
My 95-year-old aunt remembers riding in Baker Electric cars. Worked well for the time since range was not an issue - there weren't any roads! Well, not out of town, anyway.

She was living in Columbia, Missouri, and one would take the train to KC or St. Louie.

Electrics were favored among the ladies 'cuz you didn't have to crank or choke 'em!

I believe they cost quite a bit more than a Tin Lizzy.
 
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