Hydrate or die...

Bricoop

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old post, but i used to get ready for heat by driving when practical with heater full blast, middle of summer windows up , throw on a sweater, & breath....., it helped, read up on All the heat exhaustion- stroke warning signs, for yourself& others, when u get to that level of body temp, u get confused, dizzy, stubborn, ' im fine', heat stroke is Serious, dont think that you can ' walk it off' , and you'll get over it, u wont, if you get& survive heat stroke, you can never take the heat& cold again, you cooked your bodys thermostat.be safe, lottsa gator aid!!
Professional marathoners will train in extra clothing to simulate high temps, no reason your idea shouldn't work. Though I might be careful of doing it while driving. Regularly taking one's temperature through heat threshold training is good practice. It takes weeks if not months to condition one's body to higher temps.
 

jon coleman

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yes! i used to go into conditioning mode after work& After i got off the freeway, it was about 15- 20 minutes
 

JDDurfey

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When I worked outside all day in Phoenix we never rolled the windows up on the way to lunch or while commuting. We would run the AC to give us a slight reprieve from the heat, but not acclimate to the AC completely. This may be a good idea for pit crews as the travel from pit to pit during the race too.
 

MTPyle

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We need to buy new camel packs for our truck as they got damaged.

Anyone have a good recommendation for a model that works well for racing?

Mike
 

dan200

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We need to buy new camel packs for our truck as they got damaged.

Anyone have a good recommendation for a model that works well for racing?

Mike
Dan Roth at HOSTYLE has cool ones. He will be at tech.
 

dan200

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if you get& survive heat stroke, you can never take the heat& cold again, you cooked your bodys thermostat.be safe

I got it and its why I started this thread a few years ago. Maybe not heat stroke but massive heat exhaustion for sure. It took me out and now I am hypersensitive to it. Today I BBQed for all the guys at the shop. In the shade. It was 105. I took salt pills and vitamins and chugged water all AM. I am typing this with hand cramps from dehydration.

This stuff is real. Its incapacitated me and whats worse is, it has scared me. I'm not really the preachy type but this is something I probably wont ever stop warning people about.
 

Walter

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Getting used to it is important, as some of you have pointed out.

In the old days Bob Hannah and his then-wrench Keith McCarty used to drive the box van to the MX races in the heat. Other riders flew. Bob always kicked ass and took names when the weather got toasty and the other riders suffered and slowed.

In the late 70's and early 80's when I ran a bike with SCORE, I would not feel really prepared unless I could jog for an hour w/o stopping in 90-100 degree weather in May in Tucson. PS: I was still slow!
 

FinishlineIV

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Human beings are not camels- we cannot store up vast quantities of fluid for use later on, rather once we are fully hydrated the body has to ditch any excess. To state the obvious, this is why when you start drinking a lot sooner or later you start peeing at least some of it back out. Many athletes believe peeing a lot is a good thing because we’ve been told time and time again that producing clear urine in large quantities is a sign of ‘good hydration’ and therefore something to strive for. Ironically, this is most often the case with athletes who tend to suffer from hydration related issues during races. Those who struggle with cramps or headaches, for example, have more of a tendency to overcompensate, as they are conscious they must not become ‘dehydrated’. Simply drinking more and more fluid pre-race won’t solve any of those issues; in fact, it could make them worse. If you are only consuming water while racing, your body will release sodium in the urine, which leads to an imbalance in the body’s sodium levels (hyponatremia).

So How Much Water Is Enough? There are no exact rules for how much water to drink while racing because everyone is different. The National Academy of Medicine recommends 91-125 ounces of water a day for regular consumption. If you pound a gallon of water in two hours and your urine comes out clear that means your body did not retain the hydration. Clear urine is a sign of “overhydration”. Water that is not accompanied by food or nutrients slips right through the digestive tract and is not absorbed by your body.

Dehydration happens when you lose more fluid than you consume. Most people think that the purpose of hydration is to prevent dehydration and replenish electrolyte stores that may be lost via sweat. Although both of those are true, the fundamental goal of hydration is to deliver oxygen to working muscles. Hydration and the fluid you consume are a way of helping your muscles breathe, which in turn gives them the energy they need to perform. When an IV infusion is utilized before an event, this extends peak physical performance by ensuring that the muscles have the nutrients necessary to sustain their activity. IV therapy for athletes will send fluids and nutrients directly into the bloodstream, for faster and more effective results. The intravenous route is the fastest way to deliver fluids and vitamins throughout the body. The bioavailability of the IV vitamins and medications is 100%, unlike oral hydration where many of the nutrients are lost in digestion before entering your circulation. Many professional athletes utilize IV treatments prior to competing. The National Football League teams revealed that 75% (24 of 32) of the teams utilized IV infusion of fluids for prehydration in otherwise healthy individuals. The most common reason cited was the prevention of muscle cramps (23 of 24 teams). IV Therapy will alleviate soreness and shortens the overall recovery time of the muscles.

When you exercise your body is under stress. There are ways you can eat and drink to lessen that stress or encourage it. While water does fundamentally provide your body with fluid, it does not truly hydrate you. Water needs to be in a specific concentration to exit the stomach and move into circulation where it can be used by the body. When it comes to hydration, if the ratio of carbohydrates to fluid is too high or the electrolyte profile is too low, the delivery of fluid slows down. It sits in the stomach. That’s what causes sloshing and GI (gastrointestinal) issues during racing. With specialized medications that can be added to an IV infusion, it can lessen most GI issues that occur while racing. Direct injection into the bloodstream has been proven to be the most potent and effective for nutrient and medication absorption.

The reality is that pre-competition hydration is actually a bit of a balancing act and definitely not just a battle to get as much water as you can. IV fluids effectively bypass the digestive system, and they are quickly absorbed into the body, going straight to the cells, gaining energy faster than anything you can do orally. The practice of using IVs for racers to achieve maximum hydration is highly effective when administered 12-24 hours prior to racing. During long races, the blood flow to the stomach is redirected to the muscles. This reduction in blood flow to the stomach results in a decrease in the ability to digest and absorb nutrients. That’s one reason why, when racers drink a sports drink right after a race, they may vomit. Only 30 to 40 percent of oral fluids are absorbed by the cells, nerves, and muscles. Because IV fluids are delivered directly into the bloodstream, a person can enjoy full, immediate absorption. Your cells have instant access to hydration, vitamins, and electrolytes because they do not have to wait to be absorbed by your stomach. By administering an IV before physical activity, such as racing, an athlete will be better able to perform.
 

jon coleman

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great info, sports drink at finish line?, naaa, top chase crews have a beer at 34.5 deg. ready for driver, co driver first of course..
 

TwistyItch

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To repeat/add to what FinishlineIV has posted, frequent repeated ingestion of water/electrolytes is much better than gulping water when you get the chance, like crashing (as you do more often when you're dehydrated) or stopping. That is why we invented LiquidAider. I truly believe we can help. LiquidAider.com and IG @liquidaider
I'm wrapping up a 7 week trip in Taiwan to get the first production kits finished and shipped. Coming real soon.
Feel free to remove this post.
 

51rcr

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by the sounds of that we need an IV everyday. Great for a little short football game every now an then. but I would have to say the 30 to 40% absorption isnt believable. When workers are drinking 2 gallons of water a day and not pee or very little they sure absorbed more then that. the body is usinig it for and needs that for cooling. When someone starts fully hydrated and lose # from activity they needed more intake. I think i will stick with drinking lots if i can and let my body expel the wastes it chooses not to use. And If your sweat no longer is salty you better be adding stuff. If your clothes are salt stained you better be eating or taking in whatever your body is craving. Lots of people dont get paid enough for what they put there body through, even when conditioned
 

Bro_Gill

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During the Summer in the low desert, I try to do 1 liter and hour during the day, so 2 gallons is about right for an 8 hour day. Even then, I would be dehydrated, but never experienced heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Your body sweats to try to cool down. The salts, etc... lost through this process not only allow water to pass through membranes to allow the sweat, but are also used for many other functions in the body. They regulate heart rate, help regulate muscle activity, liver and kidney function, etc... So it isn't just about water. As they said in Idiocracy- 'It's got lectrolites!' Yep, that's what you need. Not just water, but water is a start.
 

scottm

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I came pretty close to heatstroke from digging out a stuck stock-full truck in nevada in july. I can't remember now if it was V2R or Nevada 400, but I remember it was wayyyy over 100..
 

Bro_Gill

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There was that year they did the Henderson race and I remember it being way over 120 degrees on the dry lake down by Searchlite, and the BLM folks trying to kill people by making everyone spectate on the downwind side on the lake bed. It was incredibly stupid of them and really hot too!
 

TwistyItch

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No matter how you choose to hydrate, please do it. We'd prefer you used our wireless push-button system, but do something. August is going to be deadly. We'll have hydration bladders and insulated bags for sale. See you there and please come say hello. More info in the Showroom section here.
LiquidAider push button hydration system
 

mxben

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Human beings are not camels- we cannot store up vast quantities of fluid for use later on, rather once we are fully hydrated the body has to ditch any excess. To state the obvious, this is why when you start drinking a lot sooner or later you start peeing at least some of it back out. Many athletes believe peeing a lot is a good thing because we’ve been told time and time again that producing clear urine in large quantities is a sign of ‘good hydration’ and therefore something to strive for. Ironically, this is most often the case with athletes who tend to suffer from hydration related issues during races. Those who struggle with cramps or headaches, for example, have more of a tendency to overcompensate, as they are conscious they must not become ‘dehydrated’. Simply drinking more and more fluid pre-race won’t solve any of those issues; in fact, it could make them worse. If you are only consuming water while racing, your body will release sodium in the urine, which leads to an imbalance in the body’s sodium levels (hyponatremia).
So How Much Water Is Enough? There are no exact rules for how much water to drink while racing because everyone is different. The National Academy of Medicine recommends 91-125 ounces of water a day for regular consumption. If you pound a gallon of water in two hours and your urine comes out clear that means your body did not retain the hydration. Clear urine is a sign of “overhydration”. Water that is not accompanied by food or nutrients slips right through the digestive tract and is not absorbed by your body.
Dehydration happens when you lose more fluid than you consume. Most people think that the purpose of hydration is to prevent dehydration and replenish electrolyte stores that may be lost via sweat. Although both of those are true, the fundamental goal of hydration is to deliver oxygen to working muscles. Hydration and the fluid you consume are a way of helping your muscles breathe, which in turn gives them the energy they need to perform. When an IV infusion is utilized before an event, this extends peak physical performance by ensuring that the muscles have the nutrients necessary to sustain their activity. IV therapy for athletes will send fluids and nutrients directly into the bloodstream, for faster and more effective results. The intravenous route is the fastest way to deliver fluids and vitamins throughout the body. The bioavailability of the IV vitamins and medications is 100%, unlike oral hydration where many of the nutrients are lost in digestion before entering your circulation. Many professional athletes utilize IV treatments prior to competing. The National Football League teams revealed that 75% (24 of 32) of the teams utilized IV infusion of fluids for prehydration in otherwise healthy individuals. The most common reason cited was the prevention of muscle cramps (23 of 24 teams). IV Therapy will alleviate soreness and shortens the overall recovery time of the muscles.
When you exercise your body is under stress. There are ways you can eat and drink to lessen that stress or encourage it. While water does fundamentally provide your body with fluid, it does not truly hydrate you. Water needs to be in a specific concentration to exit the stomach and move into circulation where it can be used by the body. When it comes to hydration, if the ratio of carbohydrates to fluid is too high or the electrolyte profile is too low, the delivery of fluid slows down. It sits in the stomach. That’s what causes sloshing and GI (gastrointestinal) issues during racing. With specialized medications that can be added to an IV infusion, it can lessen most GI issues that occur while racing. Direct injection into the bloodstream has been proven to be the most potent and effective for nutrient and medication absorption.
The reality is that pre-competition hydration is actually a bit of a balancing act and definitely not just a battle to get as much water as you can. IV fluids effectively bypass the digestive system, and they are quickly absorbed into the body, going straight to the cells, gaining energy faster than anything you can do orally. The practice of using IVs for racers to achieve maximum hydration is highly effective when administered 12-24 hours prior to racing. During long races, the blood flow to the stomach is redirected to the muscles. This reduction in blood flow to the stomach results in a decrease in the ability to digest and absorb nutrients. That’s one reason why, when racers drink a sports drink right after a race, they may vomit. Only 30 to 40 percent of oral fluids are absorbed by the cells, nerves, and muscles. Because IV fluids are delivered directly into the bloodstream, a person can enjoy full, immediate absorption. Your cells have instant access to hydration, vitamins, and electrolytes because they do not have to wait to be absorbed by your stomach. By administering an IV before physical activity, such as racing, an athlete will be better able to perform.








@E.Hagle
 

Dirtman

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There’s no doubt that water or something with electrolytes while racing is huge, that’s why we wear catheters! I’ve used Finishline IV Hydration a few times now and it makes a noticeable difference in how I feel on race day and super quick recovery afterward. There is no doubt in my mind that getting the fluid, electrolytes, glutathione, vitamins, etc. directly into the bloodstream can’t be matched by trying to take all of that orally and hope it gets absorbed, which in fact only a small percentage does. There’s a reason the fast guys are getting real IVs and not relying on trying to get the same result orally. I doubt you’ll find anyone who didn’t feel the benefits of the IV.
 

-thor-

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Also this is good: put salt (sea salt is better) around a glass, ice, one whole lime juice and fill it it with club soda (mineral water), not only tastes good but hydrates your body.
if want to keep with the party on the next day, a clamato will do: sea salt around the glass, lime juice in the glass, worchester, ice, clamato and instead of beer, fill it with mineral water.
 
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