I Beam Goemetry

TxPhPrerunner

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I have two different ideas to reduce or eliminate caster (yes I said caster) change in my I beam Ford. Neither would be easy. 1 is to move the radius arm pivots in. This would make the radius arm I beam combo act more like an arm. I think one of the guys on this board did that to his ranger. The other is to replace the radius arm with upper and lower arms. I think I saw a setup like this on an old beam buggy in a picture. Is it worth the effort or does the caster change have enough effect on handling to make it worth it?

I don't live on the edge. I fell over long ago.
 

TRDshaunTRD

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If you are going to be putting th work into upper and lower arms, why not just conver the beams to arms?

"Those who risk nothing, are nothing."
 

TxPhPrerunner

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Converting to A arms would be even more difficult. At this point I'm not sure if I'm going to do anything more than extend the radius arms. Just some ideas I'm kicking around.

I don't live on the edge. I fell over long ago.
 

AaronDixon

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Moving the radius arm pivot in would reduce caster change. The best way to reduce camber change is to build a 4-link for the radius arms. This is the same set-up that Enduro Racing used on their Class 8/TT F-150.
 

1992f150

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If I remember right, UPS Greg's radius arms are mounted inboard towards the centerline of the truck. Seems like it would help turning radius at least.

Azusa: shame of the foothills
 

drtdevil93

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it helps with that, and also how ibeam trucks pull the tires rearwards as they droop. ive been toying with the idea of having the beams and radius arms how you mentioned ("4linked"). then you could make a decent camber and caster curve, and youd reduce tire scrub. could be interesting.

erik
 

ntsqd

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I've toyed with using the beam for main support, but putting the BJ's/SB's in a part that could swivel and using a secondary, light weight control rod to generate the camber curve I want.

The castor gain of a beam in bump is favorable, it's only in droop where I see problems.

I thinkk by the time you combine both ideas you'll have a really large SLA system, may as well start out with that in mind.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 
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