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I want to learn

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
I want to learn to Tig weld. I think I have the basics of Mig welding down from the little bit that I learned from a college professor back in school and the years of using my little 110 mig welder with crappy fluxcore wire that I self taught myself on. I would love to take a class but all the coarses are offered on weekday evenings which I can't make it to. Does anyone know of anyplace that offers classes in Tig welding on weekends down in San Diego. Or, would anyone be willing to take the time and teach me the basics. I would be more then willing to dedicate a couple Saturdays or Sundays to learning and getting a little experience.

JCAndrews,
If you read this, I see your up in Ramona, I live up there also. Did you build your truck yourself? I read another thread that you would like to get some support. What are you looking for? I'm looking to gain experience working on and around the fabrication equipment. I'd love to get together sometime and talk with you to see what you're looking for. I'd be more then willing to volunteer my time and effort if it will give me the opportunity to walk away with some skills that I'm looking to develope.

Khris

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart
 

mike_hinson

Well-Known Member
Check with some of the local welding supply shops. They may be able to point you in the right direction.
Mike
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
Oh DUH!! I didn't even think of that, thanks for the advice.

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart
 

mike_hinson

Well-Known Member
The local welding supply shops are always having trade shows with major manufactures there. Good way to get info and get connected. You might luck out and find one in your area. Just talking to a Miller/Hobart, ESAB, Lincoln field rep can get you started. They are always extremely helpful.
 

DougM

Well-Known Member
Ramona HS has the BEST ROP welding classes in SD. Check out this site.
<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/rop/courses/ramona.pdf>http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/rop/courses/ramona.pdf</A>

I took them at Mission Bay HS back in 92-93. great program and usually at night so you can go after work. I want to go again to refresh myself but no time with a 1 year old kid..maybe next year.
 

singlehanded

Well-Known Member
I am taking a tig class this semester at fullerton college. Most of the classes are during the week at night or almost all day. The class I am taking is on saturdays from 8am-12 noon. Its a really good class and you can miss it a few times no big deal, like to go to the races ect. My teachers name is robert saddler and he knows his stuff. This may be to far away for you but dont any jcs have classes on saturday? Also check at welding fab shops, places that fix fencing and build stuff for people. I might start working a few days a week at one of these shops. You can learn a lot at a place like that, and they even have a blacksmith. good luck

local
 

JCA

Well-Known Member
I got your pm and I replied. I would like to meet you. I did not build my truck. I don't have the skill or abbilities but I am learning. The help I am looking for is basically all parts of a team including co riders, chase, pit and prep. Thanks and see you soon.

J.C. Andrews
Andrews Racing
<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.andrewsracing.com>www.andrewsracing.com</A>
 

desertratt

Well-Known Member
question is do you know how fab stuff? this how some of our welders have got to be where they are in our shop. they get their foot in the door and we will let them practice on their own time to tig or mig and when they are good enough and an opening comes up we let them have a shot.

get on the gas or get out of my way!!
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I've built the suspension on my Golf cart, Built a cage for our CJ7 Rock Crawler, and made tons of miscelanious little things that could be considered "Fab" work. I'm just looking to learn to Tig weld. I think I may have a in at a shop just after the 1st of the year and if it goes through the owner has expressed that he would be willing to teach and let me learn on his equipment as long as I put out the effort which won't be a problem. I'm just thinking it would be nice to get a little experience before I walk through his door to show that hey, I took the initiative to go out and try to learn this skill and get a jump start. My biggest problem is time to do it. My Mon-Fri is shot cause I leave the hous at 6AM for work and usually don't get home from work till 7PM. Just enough time to have dinner and go to bed. That's why I'm looking for something on the weekends.

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
Sleep should be considered optional.
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by BradM on 10/31/01 08:28 AM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
You know, I'm getting to that point!!!!!! If only I could figure out how to make it work!!! Actually the easiest fix would be to just quit my current job which I'm planning on doing soon!! I'd just like to be able to get in with a fab shop in San Diego at the ground level to learn everything from the basics up before I quit. Any fab shop owners out there want a 24 Y/O college grad working in their shop? I'm very dependable, have a passion and will to learn the skills and knowledge involved!!!!

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
Yes khris your problem is you are sleeping! Do poeple do that anymore??? No really I understand as I am sure everyone else does. There just aren't enough hours in a day!

Anyhow, I have an idea on something you might start working on. Get yourself a peice of welding rod and work on feeding it with the opposite hand you hold a torch with. This is one of the harder things to master and you can pratice just about anywhere. Just a thought.....

Tony
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
Tigger
I've never Tig welded, I honestly havn't even seen a tig welder. What is the process and motions if you can describe them in typing? At home I've got a old lincoln Stick arc welder, a small 110V wire feed using fluxcore since we don't have the gas setup yet, and a set of torches we use for really thin stuff but mostly for brazing. Is it similar to using a torch and filler rod?

For your practice advice I've got a question. If I'm Mig welding I either use both hands or just the left one (I'm left handed). When brazing or using the torch and filler rod I hold the torch in my right hand and the rod in my left. Are you saying to practice opposite of that?

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by sirhk100 on 10/31/01 12:39 PM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

Waldo

Safehouse
Isn't Tig welding similar in "hand position" as Acetylene Gas welding? Torch in one hand and filler in the other...feeding in the filler as you procede down the tube or metal. If you have ever done that with any sort of practice like above head or over head, you might be able to Tig easier. I have only gas welded and Mig welded, so from what I have seen, gas and tig might be similar in action.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

singlehanded

Well-Known Member
Ya, oxy acetylne is very similar to mig. Getting practice doing that will help a great deal for picking up tig fast. You use both hands and a similar technique. It would be a lot cheaper picking up a used acetylene system (if you dont already have one) and practice on it ,so you can pick up tig faster. It also comes in handy cutting metal if you dont own a plasma, a little messy but does the job.

local
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
Yeah Khris get to practicing with the good old torches. The only thing really different about it TIG welding in you don't control the heat with a pedal. But if you get welding with a torch down you should have no trouble learning to TIG... Good luck! Oh you can hold it what ever way works for you..

Tony
 

sirhk100

Well-Known Member
I've heard about this pedal!! Once again all my welding has been self taught and my stuff seems to stick together fine and after 10 minutes or so of practicing before I jump on my actual work it looks decent for the quality of tools/welders I'm using. Anyways, with the torch, I adjust the oxy/ace to get the nice cone and control the heat with the distance of the torch to the material and also the flow of the filler material. Does this sound normal or did I completely teach myself wrong? How does this pedal work? Who does it control the heat? Nevermind, I looked around online and the process makes sense, you have a gun basically that provides the arc to heat the material and supplies the shielding gas, then with the other hand you feed in the filler material. So I'm assuming the pedal everyone refers to controls the amperage of the arc to control the heat? This is actually adjustable while you are welding?

Also now I see why you say to practice at least with the torches and filler rod to get the filler rod control and motion down. Thanks for the input on this stuff.

I guess I gotta go get my bottles filled this weekend and make a run down to the scrap yard for some metal to stick together. What thicknesses should I be playing with? I've only used it for thin stuff like exhaust systems.

'99YZ400,
'92 Ford Exploder lifted work in progress,
lifted golf cart <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by sirhk100 on 10/31/01 02:32 PM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

DPpatrol

Well-Known Member
The pedal is the coolest part of tig. The more you press the pedal, the hotter the arc. The ability to control the heat of the arc as you are welding drastically improves the quality of the weld. If you can weld with a acetelene torch, tig shouldn't be much of a problem. In a way its easier cause the torch is smaller and not as clumsy with tig, plus you have so much control over the heat of the arc, it makes it a little easier not to melt through the metal and to get a better weld.
 

Jimmy8

Well-Known Member
One thing I learned is to always make sure your tig tip is sharp. It is a little thing, but I have learned it makes a huge difference in the quality of the weld.
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Not all TIG's have a pedal. Some have a heat setting controlled only by the knobs on the front of the machine. These tend to be strike-arc set-ups. Most old school race vehicle fabricators use them. Newer is a knob on the torch that replaces the pedal. Pedals are hard to use flat on your back welding overhead with little room for you btwn the chassis and the fixture. BT,DT. Resorted to having my employer run the pedal, a "Ready....more heat....little more.......back off a bit......too far.......Ok slowly back off.....and we're done" kind of thing.

My advice: get a mid 70's vintage chevy truck hood from a body shop. Cut out chunks, remove the paint, and gas weld them. When you get to the point where you can make a uniform and consistant bead that is structurally sound, TIG will be an easy thing to pick up. Merely fusing the pieces together is cheating, you need to do it using filler rod. There's a few small pieces on the dune buggy I'll have at Barstow this weekend welded this way, from this material.

The controlled feeding of rod into the puddle is the hardest part to learn and after ~10 years I still don't really have it down. A welder I worked for invented a manual rod feeder for welding the Kerker Harley Exhausts he did a while back. Got it patented and leased the rights to a side door operation of Lincoln's. Never have seen it on the market. Thot about building one for myself.

"Teach you all I know and you're still stupid"
-- Howdy Lee
 
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