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Ian Young's Baja Moment ...3X

deano

McDeano
Ian Young is 22 years old and he is Colton Udalls younger brother - He is from San Clemente, he is a young Baja champion and he is very fast on a motorcycle - But even more, he is an old soul and sees life for what it is and doesn't take it for granted at all .... Please read his Baja Story and be glad that he is out there on the Baja desert floor, racing with everyone .. I'm proud to know him and his family



SEE BELOW

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deano

McDeano
Ya it's gone - didn't copy - I'll try and upload it again -
 
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deano

McDeano
Ian Young
3x
2016 Baja 500
When someone asks you" what do you think or most people think about Ian Alexander Young" they may be able to come up with a few different words to conclude who I am. Widely over-spoken at times, Out-going, Loud, Goofy, Smiling, Positivity," Living The Dream" and Over The Top are just a few examples that at times can be shunned upon however, at other times, Can be a Complete Blessing in Disguise.
This year's June 2016 Baja 500 meant a few different things to me. For most and widely for all its about the Taco's, Cerveza's, Grungy hotel rooms with cold water, June heat, Pre-running the race course with friends, and the crazy Gringo's (Americans) who are running rapid thru the streets of downtown Ensenada living it up, for the entire week leading up to the race. The 2016 Baja 500 For I, like I said before, meant something completely different. Through a bit of luck (all racing has luck) and opportunity, I was a part of the Winning Pro Motorcycle effort at the 2015 Baja 500 with Team Kawasaki! Since then a few things have changed and I was excited to adapt with it, life! Back on the trusty Honda crf450x, back with the people I've known for so long and back with another opportunity to race my motorcycle in Mexico, with my friends, surrounded by a giant off road family environment all going for the same cause. Personal Glory.
Saturday morning May 28th I hoped in my loaded down Ford Van, Kissed Mom goodbye and got on interstate 5-South headed to Baja. I was ready to take on the challenge of Man, Machine, Pure Adventure and the Raw Baja Elements for the next 9 days all on my own. All of which are my favorite things to do. In the past few months I've been big on "Personal Growth" because with how I look at life, We are all people and we all go thru different experience's in our individual daily lives. Whether married with kids, dating, single, new job, old job, next race or past race! We are all searching for the common inner happiness we as people and as individuals all share and strive for. I knew these next 9 days would be filled with growth however, I didn't know what departments of growth I would be growing in.
Saturday May 28th Afternoon - Friday Night June 3rd. Wow, I may only be 22 but geez is time flying! Does anyone else feel like holy smokes batman, its already June!!Well at least I do and that's how I can briefly describe my week. Pre running is a simple term that us racers use while in Mexico to basically say we are practicing for our individual race course sections or legs of the race. As competitors practice the race course the Baja hwy's are packed with all race team personnel driving back and forth picking up the drivers or riders wherever they may be. 8/10 times the Pre-run driver who is responsible for picking you up and taking care of you (a glorified helper) is more important than the rider or driver himself because He is basically your only lifeline if you have any issues while out on the racecourse practicing in a 3rd World Country. In conclusion I couldn't find a driver so I said heck with it, I'll do it by myself. Without hurting anyone's feelings, Motorcycles in Baja are slowly but surely disappearing due to a magnitude of different reasons while all the sissy car and truck guys of Baja are wearing trunks, shoes and t-shirts all pre-running around with seat belts, roll cages, GPS and a cooler full of beers, sandwiches' and a few waters. Meanwhile all of us crazy dirt bike guys are indulged in all of the uncontrolled risk the elements bring out while spending countless hours in the Vast Baja deserts. You tell me who's smarter.. Hopefully you said the sissy car and truck guys because that's at least how I look at it now. With a little Luck I managed to have a complete mistake free week, riding just under 1000 miles getting ready and learning my 200 mile section. I quickly felt like I was prepared for the task ahead.
June 4th 2016 @ 6am sharp the green flag raised and the start of the 48th Annual Baja 500 blasts off into what would be a quick unforgettable day. Expected temperatures of 115 + degree heat made the difficulty factor that much more concerning. Our Ox motorsports Honda team had 2 motorcycles lined up. Baja Champions Colton Udall and Mark Samuels piloted the 1x machine while Ray Dal Soglio, Nic Garvin, and myself would be teaming up on the 3x race machine for the Hot grueling 500 miles. The race quickly played out with 1x Colton Udall and 45x Ryan Penhall battling it out for the first 225 miles until Ryan had a scary get off resulting in a concussion and a sore body leaving the race Win in Colton's hands where he took it the remainder of the way back into Ensenada claiming Pro Moto Victory.
Meanwhile behind them a race for 3rd was unfolding into something very exciting. The 6x bike of Ryan Smith, Travis Livingston , Jay Rabjohn and Trulove were controlling the position while SRT racing 37x, 10x Skyler Howes and 3x all followed within marginal distance trying to claim the last prestigious podium position. My leg of the race course consisted of arguably the most difficult in all of Baja, The infamous San Felipe whoops up to San Matias wash, thru Mikes Sky Ranch finishing up just past the Kurt Caselli memorial marking about 190 miles total. All Highlighted places I just named are certain spots in Mexico to be safe safe safe! lucky me and little did I know what growth I was in for. Hoped On the semi straight bike 6th over-all about 10 minutes back from the next bike in front of me. My Game plan was, just ride the bike to the finish and be safe Ian. It was approximately 11 am and I'm riding the motorcycle at a comfortable pace thinking WOW its hot when the first from of catastrophic failure occurred. I hit a square edge bump which instantly made my rear end of the motorcycle shoot up like a springy pogo stick catapulting me dead center on my head/shoulder/back instantly popping my water reservoir and leaving me in extreme amounts of pain laying on the ground thinking oh my gosh my brother is going to kill me. To make a long story short, with the blazing heat on my back, no water and already bent up motorcycle i knew I had to get up and keep going or else id be in a lot more trouble. thru the next 80 miles of my section I went thru massive mental test as I felt the effects of little water, a hurt body and a battered thinking process.
Then Came Race Mile 288.9 just a quarter mile from my pit, somewhat of civilization and any kind of help, I came across a downed 6x race machine and its pilot Travis Livingston. instantly judging the situation with the blistering heat, I thru my motorcycle down on the ground, ran over to my buddy Travis and started the basics. Immediately realizing he was in a world of trouble, I made sure he was breathing, tried communicating with him and finally came to the conclusion that I desperately needed to go get help. I told him with tears falling down my face I was really sorry but I had to leave to get help and so I did but not without looking back every 20 feet to see if he was trying to communicate with me in any way, shape or form. I found help in Travis's best friend mike and the local ambulance that was close by, Cruz Roja. I led them back to Travis and as I beat them there for small amount of time I came back, thru my motorcycle on the ground and ran over to him again. I just started praying and trying to be there for him in any way I could. help arrived and they took over leaving me numb and thru all of this I was starting to lose it myself, my body was redlining and I was physically/ mentally shutting down. Mike pulled me off the ground, helped me start my bike and told me to get to my pit so I could get the proper nutrition and fight back the effects of the heat. I'm beyond lucky that I didn't collapse myself with everything I was personally fighting. After sitting at the pit for over 15 minutes, my body telling me No but my honor telling me yes I got backed on the bike and rode the next 20 miles thinking about Travis and hoping he got that helicopter flight they promised me he was getting. My teammate Nic found me floundering around in the desert, made sure I was okay and hoped back on toward the finish, eventually finishing 4th place in class 22 open pro.
Devastation isn't a vocabulary word that I use all too often however, typing this and reliving the situation is nothing short of it. In life, I always try to take something from any situation, analyze and build from it. There are heaps of lessons and things I can take from this situation, all life changing and all a form of growth. The only reason I knew Travis Livingston and his immediate friends around him was because we got on the motorcycle at the same place leaving us sitting across from each other in the desert 2 hours early. of course I had to walk over, introduce myself while shaking everyone's hands and having a unforgettable conversation about life, Baja, close friends, and the ones who aren't with us anymore. In conclusion I told Travis good luck, your kicking my butt so just be safe and take it home where can have a beer at the finish and talk about the good times, Smiles on both our faces, he looked back at me, gave me a thumbs up and said you too.
Being apart of someone's last moments is nothing to look forward to in life but if there's anyway I can find peace with it, its seeing all the outpouring love him and his family have received in a devastating time in all of our off road communities lives. I wrote this paper for one reason and one reason only. I wrote it for Travis and his family just so they know that Travis had someone there with him who was willing to sacrifice all glory, prize money, honor, ego or anything else us racers crave in order to be by his side begging him to wake up, get up and keep heading down the race course with me side by side. I'm honored to have met Travis and his family and they'll always have a notch in my heart. my deepest condolences to you and also the 232x warrior built team who passed away also while both living there dreams. I'm sorry guys, I did what I could.
Your Friend
Ian Young


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Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
You have earned major respect from me.

Sincerely,

Your Newest Fan
 

JDDurfey

Well-Known Member
He's a champion in my book. Both OX Motorsports bikes stopped to help fallen riders during the race. That says a ton about the character of men riding those bikes. We need more men like them!
 

JON-E

Well-Known Member
Fantastic read. I don't know Ian but I would be honored to some day.

I'm a bike guy at heart and it's a shame we keep losing bike guys every year. I've raced many times over the years and I've had people stop for me and I've stopped to help others. It's just what we do. We do it for fun and we do it for the competitiveness that's in us but at the end of the day we're one big family and that's what family does.

Thanks for sharing Deano.


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J Prich

Well-Known Member
I hope more stories surface about the kind of men Travis Livingston and Noah Evermann were. Certainly don't want to take anything away from the spectator incident but we lost a couple of great racers last weekend two and I hope for the sake of them and their families that their stories aren't lost in the shuffle.
 

rnj3897

Well-Known Member
Amazing story that leaves a lump in your throat and tear in your eye. Thank you for sharing.
Ian, your are a true hero and we thank you for being the person that you are.
 

sb4pro

Well-Known Member
Awesome story thanks for sharing . Shows exactly what it means to have an off road COMMUNITY . :)
 

619offroad

Well-Known Member
Ian may be younger than I but I now look up to such a man. It breaks my heart to hear about our fallen riders. Yet love knowing that we are a huge family at the end of the day. Nothing more honorable then putting everything on the line for what you love.

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